11 Sights in Madison, United States (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Madison, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 11 sights are available in Madison, United States.

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1. Grace Episcopal Church

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Grace Episcopal Church is located in Madison, Wisconsin, on the westward side of the Capitol Square. It was designed by James Douglas and was built in 1855. In 1885, architect David R. Jones, collaborating with a Chicago firm, redesigned the interior. The lowered ceiling in the new design remained true to the original Gothic Revival theme. It placed a traditional hammer-beam ceiling below the old vaulting and embellishing it with qua-trefoils and a large pointed arch. A second bay window was added in the 1920s. At the same time, a chapel was added along Carrol Street. Stained glass windows were added in 1887, including an English made Resurrection window. The Baptistery window of 1899 was made by Louis Comfort Tiffany. On January 1, 1976, the church was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its significance in art, architecture and religion.

Wikipedia (EN)

2. Annie C. Stewart Memorial Fountain

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The Annie C. Stewart Memorial Fountain is a fountain in Madison, the capital of the U. S. state of Wisconsin. Dedicated to the memory of Annie (Anna) C. Stewart, who engaged in charitable activities in Madison, it was constructed in 1917–1925 and erected in Henry Vilas Park in 1925. The fountain is located south of 625 Wingra Street, near the corner of Wingra Street and Erin Street in Vilas Park. The fountain is adjacent to an eagle effigy mound built by Native Americans overlooking Lake Wingra.

Wikipedia (EN)

3. Washburn Observatory

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The Washburn Observatory is an astronomical observatory located at 1401 Observatory Drive on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus in Madison, Wisconsin, United States. Completed in 1881, it was a major research facility for about 50 years. Today, it is home to the UW-Madison College of Letters and Science Honors Program, while the telescope remains in use by students in introductory astronomy courses and the general public during open houses and viewings.

Wikipedia (EN)

4. UW Geology Museum

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The UW–Madison Geology Museum (UWGM) is a geology and paleontology museum housed in Weeks Hall, in the southwest part of the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus. The museum's main undertakings are exhibits, outreach to the public, and research. It has the second highest attendance of any museum at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, exceeded only by the Chazen Museum of Art. The museum charges no admission.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

5. Hans Christian Heg

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Hans Christian Heg Daderot / Public domain

Hans Christian Heg is a statue by Paul Fjelde that was cast in 1925 and installed at the Wisconsin State Capitol building in Madison, Wisconsin, United States in 1926. The bronze statue depicting the Union soldier and abolitionist Hans Christian Heg was torn down by rioters, decapitated and thrown into a lake in June 2020. The Wisconsin state government restored and reinstalled the original statue in September 2021.

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6. Camp Randall Memorial Park

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Camp Randall was a United States Army base in Madison, Wisconsin, the largest staging point for Wisconsin troops entering the American Civil War. At this camp fresh volunteers received quick training before heading off to join the Union Army. Also located on the grounds were a hospital and briefly a prisoner-of-war camp for captured Confederate soldiers.

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7. Gates of Heaven Synagogue

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Shaarei Shamayim has been the name of two Jewish congregations in Madison, Wisconsin. The first, dating to the 19th century but no longer in existence, built what is now the eighth-oldest synagogue building still standing in the United States. The second congregation, dating to 1989, is the sole Reconstructionist congregation in Madison.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

8. Sid Boyum Female Form

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Sidney Edward Boyum was an industrial photographer, sculptor and graphic artist in Madison, Wisconsin, United States. Much of his work falls into the category of outsider art. Today, Boyum is best known for his public sculptures scattered throughout the Schenk-Atwood-Starkweather-Yahara Neighborhood on Madison's east side.

Wikipedia (EN), Wikimedia_commons

9. Olbrich Botanical Gardens

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Olbrich Botanical Gardens Chief-O at English Wikipedia / Public domain

Olbrich Botanical Gardens is a 16 acre outdoor botanical garden and 10,000-square-foot conservatory in Madison, Wisconsin. Founded in 1952 and named for its founder, Michael Olbrich, the gardens are owned and operated jointly by the City of Madison Parks and the non-profit Olbrich Botanical Society.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

10. Bascom Hill

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Bascom Hill is the iconic main quadrangle that forms the historic core of the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus. It is located on the opposite end of State Street from the Wisconsin State Capitol, and is named after John Bascom, former president of the University of Wisconsin.

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11. Henry Vilas Zoo

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Henry Vilas Zoo is a 28-acre (11 ha) public zoo in Madison, Wisconsin, United States, that is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). Owned by Dane County, the zoo charges no admission or parking fees. It receives over 750,000 visitors annually.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.