71 Sights in Hartford, United States (with Map and Images)

Looking for premium sights?

Here you can book tickets, guided tours and other activities in Hartford:

Tickets and guided tours on Viator*

Here you can find interesting sights in Hartford, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 71 sights are available in Hartford, United States.

List of cities in United States Sightseeing Tours in Hartford

1. Goodwin Hotel

Show sight on map

The Goodwin Hotel, is a historic hotel and apartment building located in downtown Hartford, Connecticut. Known for its distinctive English Queen Anne terracotta facade, the building was originally developed as an apartment building by brothers James J. Goodwin and Rev. Francis Goodwin and opened in 1881. It was designed by Francis Kimball and was modeled on buildings Rev. Goodwin had seen being constructed at the time in England. Kimball, of the firm of Kimball & Wisedell, was the architect for the Day House in Hartford, which also has an English Queen Anne design. The Goodwin Building was expanded in 1891 to Ann Street and in 1900 to Pearl Street. It was a very prestigious address at the time, with even J. P. Morgan living there during his visits to the city of his birth.

Wikipedia: Goodwin Hotel (EN)

2. Engine Company 2 Fire Station

Show sight on map

The Engine Company 2 Fire Station is a firehouse at the corner of Main and Belden streets in Hartford, Connecticut, United States. It is a brick structure built in the early 20th century, the second firehouse built for the company. Architect Russell Barker, who designed many public buildings in the city, used the Italian Renaissance Revival style, unusual for a firehouse. The front facade boasts intricate brickwork. It is one of two remaining firehouses in the city originally designed to accommodate both men and horses. In 1989, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places along with several other city firehouses. It continues to serve its original function, housing Engine Company 2 of the Hartford Fire Department.

Wikipedia: Engine Company 2 Fire Station (EN)

3. Coltsville Historic District

Show sight on map

Coltsville Historic District is a National Historic Landmark District in Hartford, Connecticut. The district encompasses the factory, worker housing, and owner residences associated with Samuel Colt (1814-1862), one of the nation's early innovators in precision manufacturing and the production of firearms. It was the site of important contributions to manufacturing technology made by Colt and the industrial enterprise he created. Coltsville is a cohesive and readily identifiable 260-acre (110 ha) area, part of which was originally listed as the Colt Industrial District on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2008.

Wikipedia: Coltsville Historic District (EN)

4. Colt Park

Show sight on map

Colt Park is a city park in the southeast Hartford, Connecticut neighborhood of Sheldon/Charter Oak. The 106-acre (43 ha) park was established from the former Armsmear Estate of Samuel Colt and Elizabeth Jarvis Colt which was gifted to the city upon her death in 1905. Today the park is home to playgrounds, sports fields, a pool and Dillon Stadium. Colt Park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on June 8, 1976, designated as part of the Colt Industrial District, valued for its association with industrialist Samuel Colt. It is bounded by Wawarme, Wethersfield, Hendricxsen, Van Dyke Avenues and Stonington, Maseek and Sequassen Streets.

Wikipedia: Colt Park (EN)

5. Oxford–Whitney Streets Historic District

Show sight on map

The Oxford-Whitney Streets District is a historic district encompassing an early-20th century residential area in the West End neighborhood of Hartford, Connecticut. It extends along the east side of Oxford Street between Elizabeth and Cone Streets, and along the west side of Whitney between Fern and Elizabeth, and includes the north side of Fern Street between Whitney and Oxford. Most of the housing, a combination of single and multi-family residences, was built between 1906 and 1919, a period later than the surrounding areas, and is predominantly Colonial Revival in character. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2010.

Wikipedia: Oxford-Whitney Streets Historic District (EN)

6. Footguard Hall

Show sight on map

Footguard Hall was the headquarters and armory of the First Company Governor's Footguard of the state Connecticut, a ceremonial military company founded in 1771 and originally tasked with protecting the governor and state legislature. The hall is located at 159 High Street, in Hartford, Connecticut, in a Romanesque Revival brick building built in 1888. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 in recognition of the organization's history and its distinctive architecture. The First Company Governor's Footguard now uses the Governor William A. O'Neill State Armory at 360 Broad Street, Hartford, Connecticut.

Wikipedia: Footguard Hall (EN)

7. Sigourney Square Historic District

Show sight on map

The Signourney Square Historic District encompasses a neighborhood in the Asylum Hill area of Hartford, Connecticut, USA, that was almost entirely built out in a single decade at the end of the 19th century as a middle-class residential area. It is roughly bounded by Garden, Ashley, and Woodland Streets on the east, south, and west, and by railroad tracks north of Sargeant Street to the north. The area retains much of its late 19th-century character, with relatively few modern intrusions. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, with small additions in 1983 and 2011.

Wikipedia: Sigourney Square District (EN)

8. Pope Park

Show sight on map

Pope Park is a public park in Hartford, Connecticut that was originally landscaped by the Olmsted Brothers. The park was donated to the city in 1895 by Colonel Albert Augustus Pope for use by his employees and city residents. Colonel Pope was the founder of Pope Manufacturing Company which built both automobiles and bicycles including the Columbia bicycle. The park was landscaped by the Olmsted Brothers design firm in 1898. In its original form, the park consisted of 90.5 acres (36.6 ha) laid out in three sections. Today it still contains its original pond and grass lawns.

Wikipedia: Pope Park (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

9. South Green Historic District

Show sight on map

The South Green Historic District encompasses a predominantly 19th-century residential area near the South Green of Hartford, Connecticut. This area features a variety of residences in both high and common styles, from the elaborate home of armsmaker Samuel Colt to multi-unit apartment houses, many of which were built between about 1860 and 1900. The district is roughly triangular, extending from South Green along Main Street and Wethersfield Avenue to include Morris, Dean, and Alden Streets. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

Wikipedia: South Green Historic District (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

10. Frog Hollow Historic District

Show sight on map

Frog Hollow is one of the neighborhoods of Hartford, Connecticut. It is a predominantly working-class residential area, bounded on the north by Capitol Avenue, the east by Lafayette Street, the south by Madison and Hamilton Streets, and on the west by Interstate 84. The neighborhood was developed between about 1850 and 1930, and still contains a remarkable concentration of residential housing from that period. The entire neighborhood, covering more than 150 acres (61 ha) and including more than 900 buildings, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Wikipedia: Frog Hollow, Hartford, Connecticut (EN)

11. Harriet Beecher Stowe House

Show sight on map

The Harriet Beecher Stowe House is a historic house museum and National Historic Landmark at 73 Forest Street in Hartford, Connecticut that was once the home of Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the 1852 novel Uncle Tom's Cabin. Stowe lived in this house for the last 23 years of her life. It was her family's second home in Hartford. The 5,000 sq ft cottage-style house is located adjacent to the Mark Twain House and is open to the public. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970, and declared a National Historic Landmark in 2013.

Wikipedia: Harriet Beecher Stowe House (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

12. Engine Company 1 Fire Station

Show sight on map

The South Green Fire Station, also known as the Engine Company 1 Fire Station, is at 197 Main St. in downtown Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1927, it is an architecturally distinctive example of Classical and Collegiate Gothic Revival architecture, designed by a prominent local firm. The station, as well as the former fire equipment maintenance house behind it at 36 John Street, were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1989. The station presently houses Engine Company 1 and Ladder Company 6 of the Hartford Fire Department.

Wikipedia: Engine Company 1 Fire Station (EN)

13. Main Street Historic District No. 2

Show sight on map

The Main Street Historic District No. 2 is a historic district in Hartford, Connecticut. It encompasses a city block in the city's downtown noted for its concentration of insurance-related highrise commercial buildings constructed in the early decades of the 20th century. It is visually dominated by the Travelers Tower, completed in 1919 and for many years Hartford's tallest building. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984, at which time it included seven contributing buildings over a nine-acre area.

Wikipedia: Main Street Historic District No. 2 (EN)

14. Good Shepherd Church

Show sight on map

The Church of the Good Shepherd and Parish House is an Episcopal church at 155 Wyllys Street in Hartford, Connecticut. It was commissioned by Elizabeth Jarvis Colt, the widow of Samuel Colt, and completed in 1867. The church and its associated parish house were designed by Edward Tuckerman Potter, and serve as a memorial to Samuel Colt and members of his family. The church and parish house were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975, and became a contributing property to the Coltsville Historic District in 2008.

Wikipedia: Church of the Good Shepherd and Parish House (EN)

15. Upper Albany Historic District

Show sight on map

The Upper Albany Historic District encompasses a predominantly residential area of the North End of Hartford, Connecticut. It extends along Albany Avenue between Garden and Woodland Streets, including side streets to the south, and extends northward to include the southern portion of Keney Park. This area was developed in the first two decades of the 20th century, and has a fine array of period middle-class housing in the Queen Anne and Colonial Revival styles. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

Wikipedia: Upper Albany Historic District (EN)

16. Greater Refuge Church of Christ

Show sight on map

Beth Hamedrash Hagodol Synagogue was an Orthodox Jewish congregation located at 370 Garden Street in Hartford, Connecticut. Founded in 1905, the congregation built the Romanesque temple on Garden Street in 1921–22. The congregation merged with the Ateres Kneset Israel congregation in 1962 to form the United Synagogue of Greater Hartford, and moved to new quarters in West Hartford. Its building, listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its architecture, is now home to the Greater Refuge Church of Christ.

Wikipedia: Beth Hamedrash Hagodol Synagogue (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

17. West End South Historic District

Show sight on map

The West End South Historic District encompasses a neighborhood of mid 19th to early 20th century residential architecture in western Hartford, Connecticut and eastern West Hartford, Connecticut. Roughly bounded by Prospect and South Whitney Streets, West Boulevard, and Farmington Avenue, the area includes a large number of Colonial Revival and Queen Anne houses, as well as numerous buildings in other period styles, with only a small number of losses. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

Wikipedia: West End South Historic District (EN)

18. Downtown North Historic District

Show sight on map

The Downtown North Historic District is a 19-acre (7.7 ha) historic district in Hartford, Connecticut. It is a predominantly residential area located around Main Street and High Street north of I-84 and south of the Amtrak railroad tracks. Its apartment blocks, houses, schools and churches, built up mainly in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as part of an expansion of the city's urban core. It includes the 130-foot (40 m) Keney Tower. The area was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004.

Wikipedia: Downtown North Historic District (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

19. West End North Historic District

Show sight on map

The West End North Historic District encompasses a neighborhood of late 19th and early 20th century residential architecture in western Hartford, Connecticut and eastern West Hartford, Connecticut. Roughly bounded by Prospect, Elizabeth, and Lorraine Streets and Farmington Avenue, the area includes a large number of Colonial Revival and Queen Anne houses, as well as numerous buildings in other period styles, with only a small number of losses. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

Wikipedia: West End North Historic District (EN)

20. Old North Cemetery

Show sight on map

The Old North Cemetery is a cemetery on Main Street in the Clay-Arsenal neighborhood north of downtown Hartford, Connecticut. It was established in 1807, and was the city's second municipal cemetery. It was the principal burying ground for the city's elites for many years, and has a fine collection of 19th-century funerary art. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998. Although burials continue to take place there occasionally, they only take place on existing plots.

Wikipedia: Old North Cemetery (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

21. High Street Historic District

Show sight on map

The High Street Historic District of Hartford, Connecticut is a 1.1-acre (0.45 ha) historic district that includes three buildings typifying the architectural styles of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the city. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998. The buildings are located at 402-418 Asylum Street, 28 High Street, and 175-189 Allyn Street, and includes the Batterson Block and Judd and Root Building, each individually listed for their architecture.

Wikipedia: High Street Historic District (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

22. Sisson–South Whitney Historic District

Show sight on map

The Sisson-South Whitney Historic District encompasses a neighborhood in the West End area of Hartford, Connecticut, that was built out between 1890 and 1930 as a streetcar suburb. It is roughly bounded by Farmington Avenue, South Whitney Street, West Boulevard, and Sisson Avenue, and includes a diversity of residential and commercial architecture, reflective of its initial development and subsequent growth. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.

Wikipedia: Sisson-South Whitney Historic District (EN)

23. Little Hollywood Historic District

Show sight on map

The Little Hollywood Historic District encompasses a concentrated collection of apartment buildings built mainly between the world wars in the West End neighborhood of Hartford, Connecticut. Located on Farmington Avenue and Owen, Frederick, and Denison Streets, they were built primarily to attract single tenants seeking small apartments, a trend that developed after World War I and ended after World War II. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Wikipedia: Little Hollywood Historic District (EN)

24. West Boulevard Historic District

Show sight on map

The West Boulevard Historic District encompasses a historic residential development on West Boulevard and Rodney Street in the West End of Hartford, Connecticut. The area was developed beginning in 1909, and most of its homes were built by a single construction firm, creating a neighborhood appearance unified by style, scale, and setting, using the principles of the then-fashionable City Beautiful movement. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.

Wikipedia: West Boulevard Historic District (EN)

25. Engine Company 9 Fire Station

Show sight on map

The Engine Company 9 Fire Station is located at 655 New Britain Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1929, it is a distinctive application of the Tudor Revival to firehouse design, and it was one of the city's first "suburban" fire stations, set in an originally less-developed outlying area. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 2, 1989. It continues to serve its original function, housing Engine Company 9 of the Hartford Fire Department.

Wikipedia: Engine Company 9 Fire Station (EN)

26. Congress Street

Show sight on map

Congress Street is a city street in the South Green neighborhood of Hartford, Connecticut. Extending for a single block from the South Green to Morris Street, it was developed in the 1850s with modest two-family residences, with infill development of larger apartment blocks around the turn of the 20th century. The entire street was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975 as a good example of a well-preserved late-19th century residential street.

Wikipedia: Congress Street (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

27. Elm Street Historic District

Show sight on map

The Elm Street Historic District encompasses a collection of architecturally distinguished institutional and residential buildings near the Connecticut State Capitol in Hartford, Connecticut. Located on Capitol Avenue and Trinity and Elm Streets, it includes the city's best concentration of early 20th-century architecture, including Bushnell Memorial Hall and several state office buildings. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Wikipedia: Elm Street Historic District (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

28. Collins and Townley Streets Historic District

Show sight on map

The Collins and Townley Streets District is a historic district encompassing a cluster of mid-to-late 19th-century residences in the Asylum Hill neighborhood of Hartford, Connecticut. It includes properties on Collins, Atwood, Willard, and Townley Streets, which range architecturally from the Italianate and Second Empire of the 1860s and 1870s to the Shingle style of the 1890s. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Wikipedia: Collins and Townley Streets District (EN)

29. Spring Grove Cemetery

Show sight on map

Spring Grove Cemetery is a cemetery on Main Street in the Clay-Arsenal neighborhood of Hartford, Connecticut. Established in 1845, it is one of the city's oldest cemeteries, and its first private non-sectarian cemetery. Its burials include a number of the city's high-profile civic and business leaders, as well as a substantial indigent population, and artist Frederic Edwin Church. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2011.

Wikipedia: Spring Grove Cemetery (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

30. Faith Congregational Church

Show sight on map
Faith Congregational Church C. Hitchcock (char46r) / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The Windsor Avenue Congregational Church is historic church at 2030 Main Street in Hartford, Connecticut. The brick Romanesque Revival-style church building, completed in 1872, now houses the Faith Congregational Church, whose lineage includes the city's oldest African-American congregation, established in 1819. The church is a stop on the Connecticut Freedom Trail and was listed on the United States National Register of Historic Places in 1993.

Wikipedia: Windsor Avenue Congregational Church (EN)

31. Ancient Burying Ground

Show sight on map

The First Church of Christ and the Ancient Burying Ground is a historic church and cemetery at 60 Gold Street in Hartford, Connecticut. It is the oldest church congregation in Hartford, founded in 1636 by Thomas Hooker. The present building, the congregation's fourth, was built in 1807, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The adjacent cemetery, formally set apart in 1640, was the city's sole cemetery until 1803.

Wikipedia: First Church of Christ and the Ancient Burying Ground (EN)

32. Capen–Clark Historic District

Show sight on map

The Capen-Clark Historic District encompasses a residential neighborhood area in the North End of Hartford, Connecticut. Centered on Capen Street between Main and Enfield Streets, it contains a cross-section of post-Civil War Victorian vernacular housing styles, and shows in its development patterns the ebb and flow of the city's economy between about 1865 and 1910. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Wikipedia: Capen-Clark Historic District (EN)

33. House of God Church

Show sight on map

Chevry Lomday Mishnayes Synagogue is a historic former synagogue building at 148-150 Bedford Street in Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1924, it is unusual for an ecclesiastical structure in that its design appears to be based on that of an apartment house. It housed an Orthodox Jewish congregation until 1963, and now houses the local House of God Church. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995 for its architecture.

Wikipedia: Chevry Lomday Mishnayes Synagogue (EN)

34. Charter Oak Cultural Center

Show sight on map

Temple Beth Israel is a historic Jewish synagogue building at 21 Charter Oak Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1875-76, it is the oldest purpose-built synagogue building in the state. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. After being rescued from threatened demolition, it now houses a local cultural center. The congregation, established in 1843, is now located at a synagogue in West Hartford.

Wikipedia: Temple Beth Israel (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

35. Laurel and Marshall Streets District

Show sight on map

The Laurel and Marshall Streets District is a historic district encompassing a late-19th and early-20th century residential area in the Asylum Hill neighborhood of Hartford, Connecticut. Extending along Laurel and Marshall Streets between Niles and Case Streets, its housing stock represents a significant concentration of middle-class Queen Anne architecture in the city. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Wikipedia: Laurel and Marshall Streets District (EN)

36. West Hill Historic District

Show sight on map

The West Hill Historic District is a prestigious residential subdivision of the town of West Hartford, Connecticut. Originally the site of the estate of Cornelius J. Vanderbilt, son of transportation magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt, it was developed as a planned subdivision of upper-class residences in the 1920s. It was established as a local historic district in 1988, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.

Wikipedia: West Hill Historic District (West Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

37. South Congregational Church

Show sight on map

The Second Church of Christ, known more recently as the South Congregational Church, is a historic church in Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1825–27, it is one of the oldest surviving public buildings in the city. It is the third home of its congregation, which was founded in 1670, and is one of the oldest purely Congregationalist groups in the nation. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

Wikipedia: Second Church of Christ (EN)

38. Fairfield Avenue Historic District

Show sight on map

The Fairfield Avenue Historic District encompasses most of a portion of Fairfield Avenue in southern Hartford, Connecticut. Extending from Trinity College in the north to Cedar Hill Cemetery in the south, the streetscape typifies the city's development between about 1890 and 1930, a period of growth along the road fueled by the rise of streetcars. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Wikipedia: Fairfield Avenue Historic District (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

39. Charter Oak Place

Show sight on map

Charter Oak Place is a street on the south side of downtown Hartford, Connecticut. Laid out in the 1860s, its residential character is in marked contrast to the commercial development that predominates around it. The street's buildings, constructed between the early 1860s and 1900, are a cross-section of Victorian architectural styles. The entire length of the street is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Wikipedia: Charter Oak Place (EN)

40. Christ Church Catherdral Churchyard

Show sight on map

Christ Church Cathedral is a historic church at 955 Main Street in downtown Hartford, Connecticut. Built in the 1820s to a design by Ithiel Town, it is one of the earliest known examples of Gothic Revival architecture in the United States. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. It is the cathedral church of the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut, whose offices are next door at 45 Church Street.

Wikipedia: Christ Church Cathedral (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

41. Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church

Show sight on map

The Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church is a historic Methodist Episcopal Church at 2051 Main Street in Hartford, Connecticut. This High Victorian Gothic structure was built in 1873-74 for an Episcopal congregation, and has since 1926 been the home to the city's oldest African-American congregation, which was established in 1833. The church was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994.

Wikipedia: Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church (EN)

42. Vine Street Apartment Buildings

Show sight on map

The Vine Street Apartment Buildings, many now known as the Horace Bushnell Apartments, are a historic collection of residential apartment blocks at 4-48 Vine Street in Hartford, Connecticut. Built between 1922 and 1925, they consist of eleven brick buildings sharing massing, scale, and setting, with a cross-section of period building styles. They were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2012.

Wikipedia: Vine Street Apartment Buildings (EN)

43. The Village South

Show sight on map

The Wethersfield Avenue Car Barn, also known locally just as the Trolley Barn, is a historic trolley barn at 331 Wethersfield Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1902, it is the only surviving building used exclusively for the area's extensive electrified street car network in the first half of the 20th century. Now converted to other uses, it was listed on National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

Wikipedia: Wethersfield Avenue Car Barn (EN)

44. Jefferson–Seymour Historic District

Show sight on map

The Jefferson-Seymour District is a historic district encompassing a residential area on the south side of Hartford, Connecticut. Covering portions of Cedar, Wadsworth, Seymour and Jefferson Streets, it contains a well-preserved collection of late 19th and early 20th-century middle-class residential architecture, primarily executed in brick. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Wikipedia: Jefferson-Seymour District (EN)

45. Connecticut Science Center

Show sight on map

The Connecticut Science Center is a nine-story museum located on the Connecticut River in Hartford, Connecticut designed by César Pelli & Associates, which opened on June 12, 2009. The building measures a total of 154,000 square feet (14,300 m2), including 40,000 square feet (3,700 m2) of interactive exhibits consisting of videos, audios, visuals, tactile components, programs, and live demonstrations.

Wikipedia: Connecticut Science Center (EN)

46. Colt Armory

Show sight on map

The Colt Armory is a historic factory complex for the manufacture of firearms, created by Samuel Colt. It is located in Hartford, Connecticut along the Connecticut River, and as of 2008 is part of the Coltsville Historic District, named a National Historic Landmark District. It is slated to become part of Coltsville National Historical Park, now undergoing planning by the National Park Service.

Wikipedia: Colt Armory (EN)

47. Clay Hill Historic District

Show sight on map

The Clay Hill Historic District in Hartford, Connecticut is a 60-acre (24 ha) historic district that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983, and expanded in 1984. Northwest of Downtown Hartford, the district is roughly bounded by Main, Mather, Garden, and Walnut Streets. The district contains examples of Queen Anne, Italianiate and Neoclassical Revival architecture.

Wikipedia: Clay Hill Historic District (EN)

48. Imlay and Laurel Streets District

Show sight on map

The Imlay and Laurel Streets District is a residential historic district on portions of Imlay, Laurel, Hawthorn and Sigourney Streets in Hartford, Connecticut. The area is a densely built residential neighborhood developed between about 1870 and 1895, with predominantly brick Italianate and Queen Anne construction. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Wikipedia: Imlay and Laurel Streets District (EN)

49. Keney Tower

Show sight on map

Keney Tower is a memorial tower located in a small public park at Main and Ely Streets north of downtown Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1898 as a memorial to family members by the locally prominent Keney family, it is a distinctive local example of Collegiate Gothic architecture, and is the city's only free-standing tower. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

Wikipedia: Keney Tower (EN)

50. Grandview Terrace Boulevard Historic District

Show sight on map

Grandview Terrace Boulevard is a historic district encompassing a small well-preserved early 20th-century neighborhood in Hartford, Connecticut. It extends along Grandview Terrace in southwestern Hartford, between White and Linnmoore Streets, and includes a series of high-quality homes built mainly between 1910 and 1925. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002.

Wikipedia: Grandview Terrace Boulevard (EN)

51. Widows' Home

Show sight on map

The Widows' Home is a historic social service facility at 1846-1860 North Main Street in Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1864–65, its buildings are among the oldest in the city's North End, and a rare surviving example of a mid-19th-century facility for indigent women. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. The buildings have been adapted to other uses.

Wikipedia: Widows' Home (EN)

52. Dillon Building

Show sight on map

The Dillon Building is a historic commercial building located at 69–71 Pratt Street in Downtown Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1899, it is a good local example of Beaux Arts architecture, and its construction exemplified the transition of Pratt Street from a residential to commercial area. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 11, 1982.

Wikipedia: Dillon Building (EN)

53. North-West School

Show sight on map

The North-West School is a historic school building at 1240 Albany Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1891, it is a well-preserved example of a late 19th-century school building, considered state of the art at the time of its construction. It served the city as a school until 1978, and now stands vacant. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2010.

Wikipedia: North-West School (EN)

54. Polish National Home of Hartford

Show sight on map

The Polish National Home is an ethnic community support organization in Hartford, Connecticut. Its facilities are located at 60 Charter Oak Avenue, south of downtown Hartford, in an architecturally distinctive Art Deco building. It was built in 1930 to a design by Polish-American architect Henry Ludorf, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

Wikipedia: Polish National Home (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

55. Lewis Street Block Historic District

Show sight on map

The Lewis Street Block is a historic district encompassing the southern half of Lewis Street and some adjacent buildings in downtown Hartford, Connecticut. The streetscape is reminiscent of a mid-19th century city street, with architecture extending from that period into the early 20th century. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

Wikipedia: Lewis Street Block (EN)

56. Engine Company 15 Fire Station

Show sight on map

The Engine Company 15 Fire Station is located at 8 Fairfield Avenue in Hartford, Connecticut. It was built in 1909, and is one of two surviving firehouses in the city which was built to stable horses. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 2, 1989. It presently houses Engine Company 15 and Ladder Company 2 of the Hartford Fire Department.

Wikipedia: Engine Company 15 Fire Station (EN)

57. First National Bank Building

Show sight on map

The First National Bank Building is a historic commercial building at 50-58 State House Square in the heart of downtown Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1899, it is a fine local example of Beaux Arts architecture, and was one of the first of Hartford's commercial buildings to have a steel frame. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Wikipedia: First National Bank Building (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

58. Hartford City Hall

Show sight on map

The Hartford Municipal Building, also known as Hartford City Hall, is a historic Beaux-Arts structure located at 550 Main Street in Hartford, Connecticut. Completed in 1915, it is a prominent local example of Beaux-Arts architecture, and is the third building to serve as city hall. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981.

Wikipedia: Municipal Building (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

59. Saint Anthony Hall

Show sight on map

The Saint Anthony Hall Trinity College chapter house is an historic fraternity building located at 340 Summit Street in Hartford, Connecticut. Built between 1877 and 1878, it is a significant early work of the American architect J. Cleaveland Cady. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in November, 1985.

Wikipedia: Saint Anthony Hall (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

60. Mark Twain House

Show sight on map

The Mark Twain House and Museum in Hartford, Connecticut, was the home of Samuel Langhorne Clemens and his family from 1874 to 1891. It was designed by Edward Tuckerman Potter and built in the American High Gothic style. Clemens biographer Justin Kaplan has called it "part steamboat, part medieval fortress and part cuckoo clock."

Wikipedia: Mark Twain House (EN)

61. Hartford Union Station

Show sight on map

Hartford Union Station is a railroad station in Hartford, Connecticut, United States on the New Haven–Springfield Line. It is served by Amtrak Hartford Line, Northeast Regional, Valley Flyer, and Vermonter intercity rail service, plus CT Rail Hartford Line commuter rail service and CTfastrak bus rapid transit service.

Wikipedia: Hartford Union Station (EN)

62. Cathedral of Saint Joseph

Show sight on map

The Cathedral of St. Joseph in Hartford, Connecticut, United States, is the mother church and seat of the Archdiocese of Hartford. Dedicated on May 15, 1962, it stands on the site of the old cathedral which had been destroyed in a fire. It is located on Farmington Avenue just outside downtown Hartford.

Wikipedia: Cathedral of St. Joseph (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

63. Capewell Horse Nail Company

Show sight on map

The Capewell Horse Nail Company is a historic brick industrial complex located in the Hartford, Connecticut neighborhood of Sheldon/Charter Oak. It was built in 1903 by industrialist George Capewell at the corner of Charter Oak Avenue and Popieluszko Court after the previous headquarters burned down.

Wikipedia: Capewell Horse Nail Company (EN)

64. Hartford Stage

Show sight on map

Hartford Stage is an American 501(c)(3) non-profit regional theatre company located on Church Street in downtown Hartford, Connecticut. Since its founding in 1963, Hartford Stage has won the Regional Theatre Tony Award (1989) and many Connecticut Critics Circle and other awards.

Wikipedia: Hartford Stage (EN)

65. Old State House

Show sight on map

The Old State House in Hartford, Connecticut is generally believed to have been designed by noted American architect Charles Bulfinch as his first public building. The State House is currently managed by the Office of Legislative Management of the Connecticut General Assembly.

Wikipedia: Old State House (Connecticut) (EN)

66. Trinity College Chapel

Show sight on map
Trinity College Chapel Jtvoyager at English Wikipedia / Attribution

The Trinity College Chapel is a Collegiate Gothic structure built in 1933 on the campus of Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. It was designed by Philip H. Frohman of the firm Frohman, Robb and Little, who also designed the National Cathedral in Washington D. C.

Wikipedia: Trinity College Chapel, Hartford (EN)

67. Spectra Apartments (under construction)

Show sight on map

The Neiditz Building is a historic commercial building at 111 Pearl Street in Hartford, Connecticut. Built in 1950, it was the first major new office building to be built following the Great Depression. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2020.

Wikipedia: Neiditz Building (EN)

68. R. and F. Cheney Building

Show sight on map

The R. and F. Cheney Building, also known as the Brown Thomson Building, is a commercial building designed by noted American architect H. H. Richardson. It is located at 942 Main Street, Hartford, Connecticut, and is now on the National Register of Historic Places.

Wikipedia: Cheney Building (EN)

69. Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church

Show sight on map

Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church is a parish church in the Archdiocese of Hartford located in Hartford, Connecticut, United States. The parish was founded by Lithuanian immigrants within the 20th century. Construction of the church began in 1912.

Wikipedia: Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church (Hartford, Connecticut) (EN)

70. Connecticut Historical Society Museum and Library

Show sight on map

The Connecticut Historical Society (CHS) is a private, non-profit organization that serves as the official statewide historical society of Connecticut. Established in Hartford in 1825, the CHS is one of the oldest historical societies in the US.

Wikipedia: Connecticut Historical Society (EN)

71. Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius Church

Show sight on map

SS. Cyril and Methodius Parish - one of the Polish-American Roman Catholic parishes in New England in the Archdiocese of Hartford. Founded on April 6, 1902, it is designated for Polish immigrants in Hartford, Connecticut, United States.

Wikipedia: SS. Cyril and Methodius Parish, Hartford (EN)

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.

Share