26 Sights in Boston, United States (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Boston, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 26 sights are available in Boston, United States.

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1. Boston Young Men's Christian Union

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Boston Young Men's Christian Union Biruitorul (talk) / Public domain

The Boston Young Men's Christian Union is an historic building at 48 Boylston Street in Boston, Massachusetts and a liberal Protestant youth association. When Unitarians were excluded from the Boston YMCA in 1851, a group of Harvard students founded a Christian discussion group, which was incorporated as the Boston YMCU in 1852. In 1873, the organization decided to construct its own building. $270,000 was raised, and construction on the original segment completed in 1875. The building was designed by Nathaniel Jeremiah Bradlee, constructed in a High Victorian Gothic style, and included ground-level retail. Several additions were made, including in 1956. The building was designated a Boston Landmark by the Boston Landmarks Commission in 1977 and added to the National Historic Register in 1980. Boston YMCU owned Camp Union, a 600-acre (240 ha) camp, in Greenfield, New Hampshire (1929–1993). From its renovation in 2003 to 2011 it was called the Boylston Street Athletic Club, and later the Boston Union Gym or BYMCU Athletic Club.

Wikipedia (EN)

2. 5 Post Office Square

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The John W. McCormack Post Office and Courthouse, formerly the United States Post Office, Courthouse, and Federal Building is a historic building at 5 Post Office Square in Boston, Massachusetts. The twenty-two-story, 331-foot (101 m) skyscraper was built between 1931 and 1933 to house federal courts, offices, and post office facilities. The Art Deco and Moderne structure was designed in a collaboration between the Supervising Architect of the United States Treasury Department and the Boston architectural firm of Cram and Ferguson. It occupies a city block bounded by Congress, Devonshire, Water, and Milk Streets, and has over 600,000 square feet (56,000 m2) of floor space. The exterior of the building is faced in granite from a variety of New England sources, as well as Indiana limestone. It was built on the site of the 1885 United States Post Office and Sub-Treasury Building.

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3. A. Philip Randolph

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A. Philip Randolph John Bottega, NYWTS staff photographer / Public domain

Asa Philip Randolph was an American labor unionist and civil rights activist. In 1925, he organized and led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first successful African-American led labor union. In the early Civil Rights Movement and the Labor Movement, Randolph was a prominent voice. His continuous agitation with the support of fellow labor rights activists against racist unfair labor practices, eventually helped lead President Franklin D. Roosevelt to issue Executive Order 8802 in 1941, banning discrimination in the defense industries during World War II. The group then successfully maintained pressure, so that President Harry S. Truman, proposed a new Civil Rights Act, and issued Executive Orders 9980 and 9981 in 1948, promoting fair employment, anti-discrimination policies in federal government hiring, and ending racial segregation in the armed services.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

4. Central Artery Tunnel

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The Central Artery/Tunnel Project (CA/T), commonly known as the Big Dig, was a megaproject in Boston that rerouted the Central Artery of Interstate 93 (I-93), the chief highway through the heart of the city, into the 1.5-mile (2.4 km) tunnel named the Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. Tunnel. The project also included the construction of the Ted Williams Tunnel, the Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Memorial Bridge over the Charles River, and the Rose Kennedy Greenway in the space vacated by the previous I-93 elevated roadway. Initially, the plan was also to include a rail connection between Boston's two major train terminals. Planning began in 1982; the construction work was carried out between 1991 and 2006; and the project concluded on December 31, 2007, when the partnership between the program manager and the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority ended.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

5. Michael S. Dukakis South Station Transportation Center

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Michael S. Dukakis South Station Transportation Center Tony Hisgett from Birmingham, UK / CC BY 2.0

South Station, officially The Governor Michael S. Dukakis Transportation Center at South Station—is the largest railroad station and intercity bus terminal in Greater Boston and New England's second-largest transportation center after Logan International Airport. Located at the intersection of Atlantic Avenue and Summer Street in Dewey Square, Boston, Massachusetts, the historic station building was constructed in 1899 to replace the downtown terminals of several railroads. Today, it serves as a major intermodal domestic transportation hub, with service to the Greater Boston region and the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. It is used by thousands of commuter rail and intercity rail passengers daily. Connections to the rapid transit Red Line and bus rapid transit Silver Line are made through the adjacent subway station.

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6. Chinatown Gate

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Chinatown, Boston is a neighborhood located in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. It is the only surviving historic ethnic Chinese enclave in New England since the demise of the Chinatowns in Providence, Rhode Island and Portland, Maine after the 1950s. Because of the high population of Asians and Asian Americans living in this area of Boston, there is an abundance of Chinese and Vietnamese restaurants located in Chinatown. It is one of the most densely populated residential areas in Boston and serves as the largest center of its East Asian and Southeast Asian cultural life. Chinatown borders the Boston Common, Downtown Crossing, the Washington Street Theatre District, Bay Village, the South End, and the Southeast Expressway/Massachusetts Turnpike. Boston's Chinatown is one of the largest Chinatowns outside of New York City.

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7. William Hickling Prescott House

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William Hickling Prescott House, also known as the Headquarters House, is an historic house museum located at 55 Beacon Street on Beacon Hill in Boston, Massachusetts. It is the left-hand portion of a double townhouse at 54–55 Beacon Street, seen in the photograph. The townhouse, built in 1808 to a design by Asher Benjamin, was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964 for its association with William Hickling Prescott (1796–1859), one of the nation's first historians. The house is now a museum operated by the Massachusetts chapter of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America, which purchased it for its headquarters in 1944.

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8. Francis Parkman House

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The Francis Parkman House is a National Historic Landmark at 50 Chestnut Street, on Beacon Hill in Boston, Massachusetts. Speculated to be designed by Cornelius Coolidge and built in 1824, it is one of a series of fine brick townhouses on Beacon Hill. Its significance lies in its ownership and occupancy by noted historian and horticulturalist Francis Parkman (1823–1893) from 1865 until his death. While living here, Parkman produced a significant portion of his landmark work, France and England in North America, a multi-volume epic history recounting the conflict for control of North America in the 17th and 18th centuries.

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9. Quincy Market

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Quincy Market Jack Boucher / Public domain

Quincy Market is a historic building near Faneuil Hall in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. It was constructed between 1824 and 1826 and named in honor of mayor Josiah Quincy, who organized its construction without any tax or debt. The market is a designated National Historic Landmark and a designated Boston Landmark in 1996, significant as one of the largest market complexes built in the United States in the first half of the 19th century. According to the National Park Service, some of Boston's early slave auctions took place near what is now Quincy Market.

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10. Dearborn School

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The Dearborn School is an historic school building at 25 Ambrose Street in the Roxbury neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. The three-story brick Beaux Arts school was designed by Roxbury native Edwin James Lewis, Jr., and built in 1905. It is the only building to survive a c. 1950 urban redevelopment of the area. It was named in honor of Boston mayor Henry A. S. Dearborn. It served as an elementary or middle school until the 1980s, and has since been converted into housing.

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11. The Sports Museum

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The Sports Museum Nywalton at English Wikipedia / Public domain

TD Garden is a multi-purpose arena in Boston, Massachusetts. It is named after its sponsor, TD Bank, a subsidiary of the Toronto-Dominion Bank of Toronto, Ontario. It opened in 1995 as a replacement for the original Boston Garden and has been known as FleetCenter, and TD Banknorth Garden. The arena is located directly above the MBTA's North Station. It is the most visited sports and entertainment arena in New England, as nearly 3.5 million people visit the arena each year.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

12. Roxbury Heritage State Park

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Roxbury Heritage State Park is a history-themed heritage park in the oldest part of Roxbury, a former town annexed in 1868 by Boston, Massachusetts. It is anchored by the Dillaway–Thomas House, a large colonial structure built in 1750 and thought to be the oldest surviving house in Roxbury. The location includes an adjacent 1-acre (0.40 ha) landscaped park with views of the Boston skyline, and is part of the Metropolitan Park System of Greater Boston.

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13. The Institute of Contemporary Art

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The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) is an art museum and exhibition space located in Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. The museum was founded as the Boston Museum of Modern Art in 1936. Since then it has gone through multiple name changes as well as moving its galleries and support spaces over 13 times. Its current home was built in 2006 in the South Boston Seaport District and designed by architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

14. Boston Marathon Memorial

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The Boston Marathon bombing was a domestic terrorist attack that took place during the annual Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013. Two terrorists, the brothers Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, planted two homemade pressure cooker bombs, which detonated 14 seconds and 210 yards (190 m) apart at 2:49 p.m., near the finish line of the race, killing three people and injuring hundreds of others, including 17 who lost limbs.

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15. Our Lady of Good Voyage Chapel

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Our Lady of Good Voyage, also known as the Seaport Shrine, is a Roman Catholic church located at 51 Seaport Boulevard in the Seaport District of Boston and in the Archdiocese of Boston. The shrine has 250 seats and holds Mass twice daily and three times on Sundays. The original chapel was located a short distance away and was built to serve the fisherman and dockworkers in what was then an industrial neighborhood.

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16. St. Leonard's Church

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St. Leonard of Port Maurice, or more simply St. Leonard's, is a parish of the Roman Catholic Church in the Archdiocese of Boston. It is noted for its historic parish church located at the corner of Hanover and Prince Streets in the North End of Boston, one of the oldest churches built by Italian immigrants in the United States. The church is a pending Boston Landmark.

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17. Hood Milk Bottle

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Hood Milk Bottle HP Hood / Public domain

HP Hood LLC is an American dairy company based in Lynnfield, Massachusetts. Hood was founded in 1846 in Charlestown, Massachusetts, by Harvey Perley Hood. Recent company acquisitions by HP Hood have expanded its reach from predominantly New England to the broader United States. Today, the company has an annual sales revenue of about $2.7 billion.

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18. Edward Everett Hale Statue

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Edward Everett Hale Statue Daderot / Public domain

A statue of author, historian, and minister Edward Everett Hale by Bela Pratt is installed in Boston's Public Garden, in the U. S. state of Massachusetts. The bronze sculpture was dedicated on March 3, 1913. It was surveyed as part of the Smithsonian Institution's "Save Outdoor Sculpture!" program in 1993.

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19. Martin's Park

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The Martin W. Richard Charitable Foundation is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charitable foundation established by the parents of Martin Richard, an 8-year-old boy who was killed in the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013. The foundation is dedicated to promoting education and sports in the community.

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20. Abiel Smith School

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Abiel Smith School Tim Pierce / Public domain

Abiel Smith School, founded in 1835, is a school located at 46 Joy Street in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, adjacent to the African Meeting House. It is named for Abiel Smith, a white philanthropist who left money in his will to the city of Boston for the education of black children.

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21. Church of the Advent

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Church of the Advent Self-created photograph by Jonathunder / GFDL

The Church of the Advent is an Episcopal parish in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. The church is housed in a Victorian Gothic building, faced in brick with eight large change ringing bells and a 172-foot spire. It has long been a prominent center of Anglo-Catholic worship.

Wikipedia (EN)

22. Frieda Garcia Park

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Frieda Garcia Park City of Boston Archives from West Roxbury, United States / CC BY 2.0

Frieda Garcia is a longtime activist and community organizer in the South End and Roxbury areas of Boston, Massachusetts. She served as Executive Director of the United South End Settlement for 20 years and was one of the founding members of La Alianza Hispana.

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23. Bill Russell

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A statue of former professional basketball player Bill Russell by Ann Hirsch is installed outside Boston's City Hall, in the U. S. state of Massachusetts. The bronze sculpture was unveiled in 2013, and subsequent statues have been added to the memorial.

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24. Srila Prabhupada

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Srila Prabhupada Christian Jansen / CC BY 3.0

Abhay Charanaravinda Bhaktivedanta Swami was an Indian Gaudiya Vaishnava guru who founded ISKCON, commonly known as the "Hare Krishna movement". Members of ISKCON view Bhaktivedanta Swami as a representative and messenger of Chaitanya Mahaprabhu.

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25. Battery Wharf

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Boston Harborwalk is a public walkway that follows the edge of piers, wharves, beaches, and shoreline around Boston Harbor. When fully completed it will extend a distance of 47 miles (76 km) from East Boston to the Neponset River.

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26. The Lotta Fountain

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The Lotta Fountain I took this photograph. / Public domain

Lotta Fountain is a 1939 fountain and sculpture by artist Katharine Lane Weems and architects J. W. Ames and E. S. Dodge. It is installed along Boston's Charles River Esplanade, in the U. S. state of Massachusetts.

Wikipedia (EN), Website, Wikimedia_commons

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.