54 Sights in Leipzig, Germany (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Leipzig, Germany. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 54 sights are available in Leipzig, Germany.

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1. Wundt-Eiche

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Wundt-Eiche Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt was a German physiologist, philosopher, and professor, known today as one of the fathers of modern psychology. Wundt, who distinguished psychology as a science from philosophy and biology, was the first person ever to call himself a psychologist. He is widely regarded as the "father of experimental psychology". In 1879, at University of Leipzig, Wundt founded the first formal laboratory for psychological research. This marked psychology as an independent field of study. By creating this laboratory he was able to establish psychology as a separate science from other disciplines. He also formed the first academic journal for psychological research, Philosophische Studien, set up to publish the institute's research.

Wikipedia (EN)

2. Robert Blum

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Robert Blum
August Hunger
/ Public domain

Robert Blum was a German democratic politician, publicist, poet, publisher, revolutionist and member of the National Assembly of 1848. In his fight for a strong, unified Germany he opposed ethnocentrism and it was his strong belief that no one people should rule over another. As such he was an opponent of the Prussian occupation of Poland and was in contact with the revolutionists there. Blum was a critic of antisemitism, supported the German Catholic sect, and agitated for the equality of the sexes. Although claiming immunity as a member of the National Assembly, he was arrested during a stay at the hotel "Stadt London" in Vienna and executed for his role in the Revolutions of 1848 in the German states.

Wikipedia (EN)

3. Felix-Mendelssohn-Bartholdy-Denkmal

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Felix-Mendelssohn-Bartholdy-Denkmal Eduard Magnus / Public domain

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period. Mendelssohn's compositions include symphonies, concertos, piano music, organ music and chamber music. His best-known works include the overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the oratorio St. Paul, the oratorio Elijah, the overture The Hebrides, the mature Violin Concerto and the String Octet. The melody for the Christmas carol "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" is also his. Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions.

Wikipedia (EN)

4. Franz-Schubert-Denkmal

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Franz-Schubert-Denkmal Wilhelm August Rieder / Public domain

Franz Peter Schubert was an Austrian composer of the late Classical and early Romantic eras. Despite his short lifetime, Schubert left behind a vast oeuvre, including more than 600 secular vocal works, seven complete symphonies, sacred music, operas, incidental music, and a large body of piano and chamber music. His major works include "Erlkönig", the Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667 , the Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 , the "Great" Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944, the String Quintet, the three last piano sonatas, the opera Fierrabras, the incidental music to the play Rosamunde, and the song cycles Die schöne Müllerin and Winterreise.

Wikipedia (EN)

5. Museum in der Runden Ecke

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The "Runde Ecke" Memorial Museum is a museum at the former headquarters of the Ministry of National Security in Dittrichring, Leipzig, dedicated to the history, structure and working methods of the Ministry of National Security in GDR. (End). The "Runde Ecke" Memorial Museum is located at the former headquarters of the Ministry of National Security in Dittrichring, Leipzig. The "Runde Ecke" Memorial Museum is the former headquarters of the Ministry of National Security in Dittrichring, Leipzig.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

6. Panometer

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Panometer Radler59 / CC BY-SA 4.0

The Leipzig Panometer is an attraction in Leipzig, Germany. It is a visual panorama displayed inside a former gasometer, accompanied by a thematic exhibition. The current theme is "Carolas Garten". The Panometer was created in 2003 by the Austrian-born artist Yadegar Asisi, who coined the name as a portmanteau of "panorama" and "gasometer". He opened another Panometer in Dresden in 2006. His panoramas are also displayed in Berlin, Pforzheim, Wittenberg, Hanover and Rouen.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

7. St. Bonifatius

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St Bonifacius Church in Leipzig-Connevitz is the parish church of the Catholic diocese of St Bonifacius in Leipzig-Sood. Built in 1929/30 by the Catholic Business Association-today's Catholic Business and Administration Association-in memory of German Catholic businessmen killed in battle in World War I in 1500, this Art Deco church is one of the most important Catholic church buildings in Germany between the two world wars. This church is listed as a historical monument.

Wikipedia (DE), Architect Wikipedia, Website

8. Iljuschin IL-18

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Iljuschin IL-18
AlainDurand
/ GFDL 1.2

The Ilyushin Il-18 is a large turboprop airliner that first flew in 1957 and became one of the best known and most durable Soviet aircraft of its era. The Il-18 was one of the world's principal airliners for several decades and was widely exported. Due to the aircraft's airframe durability, many examples achieved over 45,000 flight hours and the type remains operational in both military and civilian capacities. The Il-18's successor was the long range Il-62 jet airliner.

Wikipedia (EN)

9. Floßplatz

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The "Raft Square"-pronounced "Kurz O" in Leipzig-is the relic of a larger historic complex that has provided wood and building timber for the city of Leipzig for centuries. "Raft Square"-pronounced "Kurz O" in Leipzig-pronounced "Kurz O" in Leipzig. Its name derives from its function as a place where the city stacks and sells timber, drifting through the Elster and Plesser rivers. Therefore, in its history, it is sometimes called Holz-or Churfürstlicher Holzplatz.

Wikipedia (DE)

10. Deutsches Buch- und Schriftmuseum

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The German Museum of Books and Writing in Leipzig, Germany, founded in 1884 as Deutsches Buchgewerbe-Museum, is the world's oldest museum of its kind, dedicated to collecting and preserving objects and documents as well as literature connected with the history of books, including paper, printing techniques, the art of illustration, and bookbinding. The museum is housed in a modern €60 million annex to the German National Library in Leipzig built in 2011.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

11. Fürstenkollegium

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In addition to the Großer Kolleg, the Kleine Kolleg was one of the two plots of land with buildings donated by the sovereigns, the Margraves of Meißen Friedrich and Wilhelm, to the newly founded University of Leipzig in 1409. The buildings were used for teaching and also served as accommodation for the magisters – there were eight in the Kleines Kolleg – and the students. The remuneration of the Magisters also belonged to the foundation.

Wikipedia (DE)

12. Iljuschin IL-62

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Iljuschin IL-62 Sergey Lysenko / CC BY-SA 4.0

The Ilyushin Il-62 is a Soviet long-range narrow-body jetliner conceived in 1960 by Ilyushin. As successor to the popular turboprop Il-18 and with capacity for almost 200 passengers and crew, the Il-62 was the world's largest jet airliner when first flown in 1963. One of four pioneering long-range designs, it was the first such type to be operated by the Soviet Union and a number of allied nations.

Wikipedia (EN)

13. Matthäikirchdenkmal

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Matthäikirchdenkmal H.-P.Haack (Diskussion) 12:42, 27. Apr. 2012 (CEST) / Attribution

St. Matthew was a church in the old town of Leipzig. During its history it had several names and functions. As a church of the Franciscan order, built in 1488, it was known as Barfüßerkirche and Heiliggeistkirche. It served as a Lutheran church, known as Neukirche, from 1699. A new congregation formed in 1876 and named the church Matthäikirche. The building was destroyed in a bombing in 1943.

Wikipedia (EN)

14. Henriette Goldschmidt

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Henriette Goldschmidt Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Henriette Goldschmidt (1825–1920) was a German Jewish feminist, pedagogist and social worker. She was one of the founders of the German Women's Association and worked to improve women's rights to access education and employment. As part of that effort, she founded the Society for Family Education and for People's Welfare and the first school offering higher education to women in Germany.

Wikipedia (EN)

15. Gedenkstein Louise Otto-Peters

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Gedenkstein Louise Otto-Peters Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Louise Otto-Peters was a German suffragist and women's rights movement activist who wrote novels, poetry, essays, and libretti. She wrote for Der Wandelstern [The Wandering Star] and Sächsische Vaterlandsblätter [Saxon Fatherland Pages], and founded Frauen-Zeitung and Neue Bahnen specifically for women. She is best known as the founder in 1865 of the General German Women's Association.

Wikipedia (EN)

16. Nikolaisäule

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Nikolaisäule
Thieme, Wolfgang
/ CC BY-SA 3.0 de

The Monday demonstrations were a series of peaceful political protests against the government of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) that took place in towns and cities around the country on various days of the week from 1989 to 1991. The Leipzig demonstrations, which are the most well known, took place on Mondays. The protests are conventionally separated into five cycles.

Wikipedia (EN)

17. Marienkirche

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St Mary's Church is a Protestant Lutheran church in the Stötteritz district of Leipzig. Built in 1702/03, it is a single nave church in Baroque style, so it is the oldest building in the area. Inside the listed churches, there is a triptych, created around 1480 and related to Hans Predenwolfe, considered the most important work of late Gothic panel paintings in Leipzig.

Wikipedia (DE)

18. Stadtarchiv Leipzig

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The Leipzig City Archives documents the history of Leipzig with documents in the form of documents, files, business books, newspapers and prints, maps and plans as well as photos and postcards since the Middle Ages. It is one of the most important municipal archives in Germany with its stocks. His tasks also include leading the city chronicle.

Wikipedia (DE), Facebook, Website

19. Reclam-Museum

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Reclam-Museum Dipl.-Des. Michael Kewitsch, Leipzig / CC BY-SA 4.0

The Reclam Museum is a book museum in the Leipzig Graphic Quarter, Kreuzstraße 12. It includes an exhibition of around 10,000 booklets, books etc. from Reclams Universal Library from its beginnings in 1867 to the present. It is the only museum and the most comprehensive collection of its kind on publications by the Reclam publishing house.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

20. 17. Juni 1953

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17. Juni 1953
UnbekanntUnknown
/ CC BY-SA 3.0 de

The uprising of June 17, 1953 was the uprising, which in the days around June 17, 1953 in the GDR came to a wave of strikes, demonstrations and protests associated with political and economic demands. He was violently depressed by the Soviet army; 34 demonstrators and spectators as well as five relatives of security organs were killed.

Wikipedia (DE)

21. Demokratieglocke

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The democracy bell is a monument that is located on Augustusplatz in Leipzig. The monument is a brass -colored, egg -shaped bell made of bronze, which is about 150 cm high. The bell is dedicated to the peaceful revolution and was inaugurated on the 20th anniversary of the Monday demonstration of October 9, 1989, i.e. October 9, 2009.

Wikipedia (DE)

22. Schinkel-Tor

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The Schinkeltor at the west entrance to the new Augusteum of the University of Leipzig is the only surviving construction fragment of the university complex on Augustusplatz from the 19th century. It has its name after the Prussian master builder Karl Friedrich Schinkel (1781–1841). It is under monument protection.

Wikipedia (DE)

23. Museum für Musikinstrumente der Universität Leipzig

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The Museum of Musical Instruments of the University of Leipzig is a museum in Leipzig, Germany. It is located on Johannisplatz, near the city centre. The museum belongs to the University of Leipzig and is also part of the Grassi Museum, whose other members are the Museum of Ethnography and the Museum of Applied Arts.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

24. Hiller-Denkmal

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The Hiller monument in Leipzig is a memorial plaque on the northwest side of the Thomaskirche for the Gewandhauskapellmeister, Thomas cantor, composer and singing teacher Johann Adam Hiller. It is the relic of a former monument (1832) west of the Thomas Church, which was the first monument for a musician in Leipzig.

Wikipedia (DE)

25. Schillerhaus

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The Schillerhaus is a small former farmhouse in the Leipzig district of Gohlis. Friedrich Schiller lived on the upper floor of the house in the summer of 1785. He worked here on the 2nd act of Don Carlos, edited the Fiesco and wrote the first version of the poem "An die Freude", which he later completed in Dresden.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

26. Heilig-Kreuz-Kirche

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Heilig-Kreuz-Kirche is a Lutheran church in Leipzig, Germany. It is located in the district of Neustadt-Neuschönefeld, in the centre of Neustadter Markt. It is the second Lutheran church after Nicholas Church since 2014. St Nicholas Kirchengemeinde, Leipzig. Bernhard Stief is currently the vicar of the parish.

Wikipedia (DE)

27. Dr.-Güntz-Park

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Dr.-Güntz-Park Autor/-in unbekanntUnknown author / Public domain

Güntz-Park is a park covering about 3 hectares in the southeast of Leipzig, located between Güntz-Straße and Schönbachstraße. According to the 1992 municipal zoning, the park belongs to the Stötteritz district, but is located in the former Thonberger Flur. That's why the other name is Thonberg-Park.

Wikipedia (DE)

28. Völkerschlachtdenkmal

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The Monument to the Battle of the Nations is a monument in Leipzig, Germany, to the 1813 Battle of Leipzig, also known as the Battle of the Nations. Paid for mostly by donations and the city of Leipzig, it was completed in 1913 for the 100th anniversary of the battle at a cost of six million goldmarks.

Wikipedia (EN)

29. Zeitgeschichtliches Forum

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The Zeitgeschichtliches Forum Leipzig is a museum of contemporary German history. The museum was opened in 1999 and focuses on the history of the German division, everyday life in the communist dictatorship of the GDR, and the reunification process. It is located in the city center of Leipzig, Germany.

Wikipedia (EN), Website, Opening Hours, Website

30. Petershof

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Petershof Frank Vincentz / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Petershof is a building complex in the city center of Leipzig, which is used as a residential and commercial building. From 1927 to 1929 he was built as a exhibition house according to plans by the Leipzig architect Alfred Liebig (1878–1952) and also housed the cinema Capitol until 2003.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

31. Peterskirche

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Peterskirche C. Schäffer / Public domain

Old St. Peter's Church is a Lutheran parish and church in the old town of Leipzig, Germany. The present church building, in Gothic Revival style, was erected from 1882 onwards at the Gaudigplatz, and also serves as a concert venue. It replaced a former building at a different location.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

32. Erholungspark Lößnig-Dölitz

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Erholungspark Lößnig-Dölitz Rat der Stadt Leipzig - Grünflächenamt / CC BY-SA 3.0

Lönig-Dölitz Leisure Park is one of the youngest and largest parks in Leipzig. It was built on a site formerly used for underground lignite mining. The park is a vast meadow area, made up of individual trees and trees, and dotted with water, with different experience areas.

Wikipedia (DE)

33. Nikolaikirche

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The St. Nicholas Church is one of the major churches of central Leipzig, Germany. Construction started in Romanesque style in 1165, but in the 16th century, the church was turned into a Gothic hall church. Baroque elements like the tower were added in the 18th century.

Wikipedia (EN), Facebook, Website

34. Heinrich-Heine-Denkmal

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The Heinrich Heine monument in Leipzig is one of the first monuments that were built in the city after the Second World War. It was inaugurated on the 150th birthday of the poet. The material comes from the base of the victory monument dismantled in 1946 on the market.

Wikipedia (DE)

35. St. Gabrielskirche

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St. Gabriel is a Roman Catholic church in Leipzig, Germany. It is a church in the Catholic diocese of St. George, north of Leipzig. Your address is Georg-Herwegh-Str. 22, 04158 Leipzig. With its extraordinary architecture, it is listed as a historical monument.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

36. Botanischer Garten Leipzig

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Leipzig Botanical Garden, , is a botanical garden maintained by the University of Leipzig, and located at Linnéstraße 1, Leipzig, Saxony, Germany. It is the oldest botanical garden in Germany and among the oldest in the world, and open daily without charge.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

37. St. Lukas-Kirche

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Lukaskirche is a Protestant church in the heart of the Volkmarsdorf district east of Leipzig. The 71-meter-high spire tower is a landmark in the area. The Holy Trinity Church, an old Lutheran church in Leipzig, has been using the sacred building since 2015.

Wikipedia (DE), Architect Wikipedia

38. Freund und Feind im Tod vereint

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The Nordfriedhof is a public cemetery run by the city of Leipzig, located at Berliner Straße 125–127 in the district of Eutritzsch between Hamburger Straße, Theresienstraße and Maximilianallee, directly adjoining the smaller Old Jewish Burial Ground.

Wikipedia (EN)

39. Zöllner-Denkmal

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Zöllner-Denkmal August Weger / Public domain

Carl Friedrich Zöllner was a German composer and choir director. After studying at the Thomasschule zu Leipzig, he started teaching voice. He wrote organ variations on God Save the Queen and wrote several songs. His son was composer Heinrich Zöllner.

Wikipedia (EN)

40. Rose

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Isa Genzken is a German artist who lives and works in Berlin. Her primary media are sculpture and installation, using a wide variety of materials, including concrete, plaster, wood and textile. She also works with photography, video, film and collage.

Wikipedia (EN)

41. Ev.-Luth. Kirche zu Wiederitzsch

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Wiederitzsch Church is a church building of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Saxony in the Leipzig district of Wiederitzsch. Its Romanesque parts date back to the 12th century. It stands on the former cemetery and enjoys monument protection.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

42. Jahrhundertschritt

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Jahrhundertschritt Jürgen Langguth / Copyrighted free use

The Footsteps of the Century is a bronze sculpture created by Wolfgang Matthew in 1984. It is regarded as one of the most important works of art in GDR during the period of German division, and it is a fable of division in the 20th century.

Wikipedia (DE)

43. Karl-Rudolf-Bromme-Denkmal

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Karl-Rudolf-Bromme-Denkmal Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Rear Admiral Karl Rudolf Brommy was a German naval officer who helped establish the first unified German fleet, the Reichsflotte, during the First Schleswig War which broke out just before the Revolutions of 1848 in the German states.

Wikipedia (EN)

44. Goerdeler-Denkmal

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Goerdeler-Denkmal
Unknown authorUnknown author
/ CC BY-SA 3.0 de

Carl Friedrich Goerdeler was a monarchist conservative German politician, executive, economist, civil servant and opponent of the Nazi regime. He opposed some anti-Jewish policies while he held office and was opposed to the Holocaust.

Wikipedia (EN)

45. Richard-Wagner-Denkmal

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The Richard Wagner monument in Leipzig was unveiled in 2013 on the occasion of the 200th birthday of Richard Wagner (1813–1883). It was created by Stephan Balkenhol using the base designed 100 years ago by Max Klinger (1857–1920).

Wikipedia (DE)

46. Park an der Etzoldschen Sandgrube

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Etzoldschen Sandgrube Park is a park in the southeast of Leipzig, commemorating the church of St Pauli University, which was blown up in 1968. You can also find the names of Freizeitpark Südost and Freundschaftspark on the city map.

Wikipedia (DE)

47. Apelstein 21

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Apelstein 21 User MOdmate on de.wikipedia / Public domain

The Apel-stones, named after the writer Theodor Apel from Leipzig who commissioned them, mark important events during the Battle of Leipzig. There are 50 all in all. They were sculpted by A. F. Aster and put up between 1861 and 1865.

Wikipedia (EN)

48. Messehof

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The exhibition center is a today's commercial building with a shop passage, the exhibition center passage, in Leipzig's city center. It was built between 1949 and 1950 and is the first city fair building after the Second World War.

Wikipedia (DE)

49. Österreicherdenkmal Lößnig

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The Austrian Monument in Leipzig is the four identical monuments for the successful participation of Austrian troops in the Battle of Leipzig in 1913, except for the inscription. The other one before stood in Markkleeberg.

Wikipedia (DE)

50. Genezarethkirche

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Paunsdorf Church is the Protestant Lutheran Church of Paunsdorf in Leipzig. Paunsdorf Church belongs to the "Eastern Diocese of Leipzig" together with Baalsdorf-Mölkau Diocese and Sellerhausen-Volkmarsdorf Diocese.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

51. Trifugium

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Trifugium Frank Vincentz / CC BY-SA 3.0

Trifugium is the name of a group of three adjacent Gründerzeit residential and commercial buildings in Barfuägäè chen 11/13/15 between Klostergasse and Dittrichring in Leipzig. Houses 11 and 13 are protected.

Wikipedia (DE)

52. Museum für Druckkunst

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Museum für Druckkunst Wolfgang Stief / CC BY 2.0

The Museum für Druckkunst Leipzig of the traditional book and publishing city is a museum that documents older techniques of printing. It is located in the Nonnenstraße of the Leipzig district plagwitz.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

53. Königsdenkmal

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Frederick Augustus I was a member of the House of Wettin who reigned as the last Elector of Saxony from 1763 to 1806 and as King of Saxony from 1806 to 1827. He was also Duke of Warsaw from 1807 to 1815.

Wikipedia (EN)

54. Goetzdenkmal

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Goetzdenkmal Die Autorenschaft wurde nicht in einer maschinell lesbaren Form angegeben. Es wird Buergermeister~commonswiki als Autor angenommen (basierend auf den Rechteinhaber-Angaben). / Public domain

Ferdinand Herman William Goetz is a doctor, president of the German Gymnastics Association, a member of the North German Parliament and a member of the German Parliament of the National Liberal Party.

Wikipedia (DE), Url

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.