100 Sights in Washington, United States (with Map and Images)

Here you can find interesting sights in Washington, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 100 sights are available in Washington, United States.

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1. Leonard Matlovich

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Technical Sergeant Leonard Phillip Matlovich was an American Vietnam War veteran, race relations instructor, and recipient of the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star. He was the first gay service member to purposely out himself to the military to fight their ban on gays, and perhaps the best-known openly gay man in the United States of America in the 1970s next to Harvey Milk. His fight to stay in the United States Air Force after coming out of the closet became a cause célèbre around which the gay community rallied. His case resulted in articles in newspapers and magazines throughout the country, numerous television interviews, and a television movie on NBC. His photograph appeared on the cover of the September 8, 1975, issue of Time magazine, making him a symbol for thousands of gay and lesbian servicemembers and gay people generally. Matlovich was the first named openly gay person to appear on the cover of a U. S. newsmagazine. According to author Randy Shilts, "It marked the first time the young gay movement had made the cover of a major newsweekly. To a movement still struggling for legitimacy, the event was a major turning point. " In October 2006, Matlovich was honored by LGBT History Month as a leader in the history of the LGBT community.

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2. Seward Square

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Seward Square Dookas27018 Lucas Keene / CC BY-SA 3.0

Seward Square is a square and park maintained by the National Park Service located at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and North Carolina Avenue in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Southeast Washington, D. C. The square is bounded by 4th Street to the west and 6th Street to the east. North and south of the park are the respective westbound and eastbound lanes of Seward Square, SE. Because Pennsylvania and North Carolina Avenues intersect in the middle of the square, it divides the square into four unique smaller parks. The park is named after William Henry Seward, the United States Secretary of State under Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. Seward is noted for his part in the American purchase of Alaska from the Russian Empire in 1867. The purchase was ridiculed at the time and was colloquially known as "Seward's Folly". There is no statue of William Seward on the site of the park, however there is a statue of his adopted daughter, Olive Risley Seward located at a private residence at the corner of 6th Street and North Carolina Avenue, SE. The statue was sculpted in 1971 by John Cavanaugh.

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3. José Martí Héroe Nacional de Cuba

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José Martí Héroe Nacional de Cuba Cuba. Secretaría de Instrucción Pública y Bellas Artes. / CC0

José Julián Martí Pérez was a Cuban nationalist, poet, philosopher, essayist, journalist, translator, professor, and publisher, who is considered a Cuban national hero because of his role in the liberation of his country from Spain. He was also an important figure in Latin American literature. He was very politically active and is considered an important philosopher and political theorist. Through his writings and political activity, he became a symbol of Cuba's bid for independence from the Spanish Empire in the 19th century, and is referred to as the "Apostle of Cuban Independence". From adolescence, he dedicated his life to the promotion of liberty, political independence for Cuba, and intellectual independence for all Spanish Americans; his death was used as a cry for Cuban independence from Spain by both the Cuban revolutionaries and those Cubans previously reluctant to start a revolt.

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4. Sonny Bono Park

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Sonny Bono Memorial Park is a park in Northwest Washington, D. C. , at the intersection of New Hampshire Avenue, 20th Street, and O Street near Dupont Circle. It is named for Sonny Bono. The park was established in 1998, after Sonny Bono's death, by Bono family friend Geary Simon, a local real estate developer. He approached the D. C. Department of Parks and Recreation's Park Partners program and paid $25,000 of his own money to revitalize an unused 800-square-foot (74 m2) triangle of grass on a traffic island. His improvements included installing an underground sprinkler system, planting new Kentucky bluegrass and a Japanese maple, as well as benches and a wrought-iron fence. The park also features a vault of Sonny Bono memorabilia, such as the sheet music for "The Beat Goes On," his official Congressional cufflinks, and a mug from his string of Bono's Restaurants.

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5. Hoover family

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Hoover family Marion S. Trikosko / Public domain

John Edgar Hoover was an American law enforcement administrator who served as the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the United States for nearly 48 years. He was appointed director of the Bureau of Investigation – the FBI's predecessor – in 1924 and was instrumental in founding the FBI in 1935, where he remained director for another 37 years until his death in 1972 at the age of 77. Hoover built the FBI into a larger crime-fighting agency than it was at its inception and instituted a number of modernizations to police technology, such as a centralized fingerprint file and forensic laboratories. Hoover also established and expanded a national blacklist, referred to as the FBI Index or Index List, renamed in 2001 as the Terrorist Screening Database which the FBI still compiles and manages.

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6. John Quincy Adams

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John Quincy Adams / Public domain

John Quincy Adams was an American statesman, diplomat, lawyer, and diarist who served as the 6th president of the United States, from 1825 to 1829. He previously served as the 8th United States Secretary of State from 1817 to 1825. During his long diplomatic and political career, Adams also served as an ambassador, and as a member of the United States Senate and House of Representatives representing Massachusetts. He was the eldest son of John Adams, who served as the second president of the United States from 1797 to 1801, and First Lady Abigail Adams. Initially a Federalist like his father, he won election to the presidency as a member of the Democratic-Republican Party, and in the mid-1830s became affiliated with the Whig Party.

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7. Oak Hill Cemetery Chapel

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The Oak Hill Cemetery Chapel, also known as the Renwick Chapel or James Renwick Chapel, is a historic building in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D. C. , United States. Designed by James Renwick, Jr. in 1850, Oak Hill Cemetery Chapel is the architect's only known example of Gothic Revival church architecture in Washington, D. C. It is located on the highest ridge in Oak Hill Cemetery, near the intersection of 29th and R Streets NW. The chapel is one of two structures in Oak Hill Cemetery listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the other being the Van Ness Mausoleum. The chapel, mausoleum, and cemetery are contributing properties to the Georgetown Historic District, a National Historic Landmark.

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8. Meridian Hill Park (Malcolm X Park)

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Meridian Hill Park, also known as Malcolm X Park, is a structured urban park located in the Washington, D. C. , neighborhood of Columbia Heights; it also abuts the nearby neighborhood of Adams Morgan. The park was designed and built between 1912 and 1940. This 12-acre (49,000 m2), formally landscaped site is officially part of the National Capital Parks Unit of the National Park System, and is administered by the superintendent of nearby Rock Creek Park. Meridian Hill Park is bordered by 15th, 16th, W, and Euclid streets NW, and sits on a prominent hill 1. 5 miles (2. 4 km) directly north of the White House. Since 1969, the name "Malcolm X Park" has been used by many in honor of minister and activist Malcolm X.

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9. Number One Observatory Circle

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Number One Observatory Circle D. Myles Cullen / Public domain

Number One Observatory Circle is the official residence of the vice president of the United States. Located on the northeast grounds of the U. S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D. C. , the house was built in 1893 for the observatory superintendent. The chief of naval operations (CNO) liked the house so much that in 1923 he took over the house for himself. It remained the residence of the CNO until 1974, when Congress authorized its transformation to an official residence for the vice president, though a temporary one. It is still the "official temporary residence of the vice president of the United States" by law. The 1974 congressional authorization covered the cost of refurbishment and furnishing the house.

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10. Capitol Hill Baptist Church

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Capitol Hill Baptist Church is a Southern Baptist affiliated church located on Capitol Hill in Washington, D. C. , six blocks from the United States Capitol. Mark Dever serves as the senior pastor of the church, where he also runs his ministry 9Marks teaching principles of "healthy church" practices. It was founded in 1878 and was originally named Metropolitan Baptist Church, after the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London. , although the naming origins are refuted by some. It was later named Capitol Hill Metropolitan Baptist Church, to differentiate it from another Metropolitan Baptist Church in the District of Columbia. It was subsequently shortened to be named Capitol Hill Baptist Church.

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11. National Museum Of American Jewish Military History

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The National Museum of American Jewish Military History (NMAJMH) was founded September 2, 1958, in Washington, D. C. , to document and preserve "the contributions of Jewish Americans to the peace and freedom of the United States. . . [and to educate] the public concerning the courage, heroism and sacrifices made by Jewish Americans who served in the armed forces. " It operates under the auspices of the Jewish War Veterans of the United States of America (JWV), National Memorial, Inc. (NMI), and is located at 1811 R Street NW, Washington, D. C. , in the Dupont Circle area, in the same building that houses the JWV National Headquarters.

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12. Guglielmo Marconi Statue

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Guglielmo Marconi is a public artwork by Attilio Piccirilli, located at the intersection of 16th and Lamont Streets, N. W. , in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood of Washington, D. C. , United States. It stands as a tribute to Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi. It was paid for by public subscription and erected in 1941. The artwork was listed on both the District of Columbia Inventory of Historic Sites and the National Register of Historic Places in 2007. It is a contributing property in the Mount Pleasant Historic District. The monument was originally surveyed as part of the Smithsonian's Save Outdoor Sculpture! survey in 1994.

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13. Monument to Balzac

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Monument to Balzac is a sculpture by Auguste Rodin in memory of the French novelist Honoré de Balzac. According to Rodin, the sculpture aims to portray the writer's persona rather than a physical likeness. The work was commissioned in 1891 by the Société des Gens de Lettres, a full-size plaster model was displayed in 1898 at a Salon in Champ de Mars. After coming under criticism the model was rejected by the société and Rodin moved it to his home in Meudon. On 2 July 1939 the model was cast in bronze for the first time and placed on the Boulevard du Montparnasse at the intersection with Boulevard Raspail.

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14. Luther Place Memorial Church

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Luther Place Memorial Church is a congregation belonging to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The neo-Gothic church building in Thomas Circle in Washington, D. C. , was designed by architects Judson York, J. C. Harkness, and Henry Davis and constructed in 1873 as a memorial to peace and reconciliation following the American Civil War. Its original name was Memorial Evangelical Lutheran Church. The Luther Monument is situated in front of the church. The statue is a replica of the centerpiece of the Luther Monument in Worms, Germany, and was given to the church in 1884 by German emperor William I.

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15. Laogai Museum

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The Laogai Museum is a museum in Dupont Circle, Washington, D. C. , United States, which showcases human rights in the People's Republic of China, focusing particularly on the Láogǎi, the Chinese prison system of "Reform through Labor". The creation of the museum was spearheaded by Harry Wu, a well-known Chinese dissident who himself served 19 years in laogai prisons; it was supported by the Yahoo! Human Rights Fund. It opened to the public on 12 November 2008, and Wu's non-profit research organization calls it the first museum in the United States to directly address the issue of human rights in China.

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16. Arts and Industries Building

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The Arts and Industries Building is the second oldest of the Smithsonian museums on the National Mall in Washington, D. C. Initially named the National Museum, it was built to provide the Smithsonian with its first proper facility for public display of its growing collections. The building, designed by architects Adolf Cluss and Paul Schulze, opened in 1881, hosting an inaugural ball for President James A. Garfield. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1971. After being closed since 2004, the building reopened in 2021 with a special exhibition, Futures, scheduled to run through July 2022.

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17. American Fazl Mosque

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The Fazl Mosque in Washington, D. C. was established by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in 1950 and is the first mosque in the U. S. capital of Washington, D. C. Its full title is the American Fazl Mosque, which helps to distinguish it from its sister mosque, the Fazl Mosque, London, both of which were the first mosques in the capitals of the U. S. and the U. K. , respectively. Located a few minutes from the White House, and neighboring several embassies, Fazl Mosque opened seven years prior to the Islamic Center of Washington and is the longest serving mosque in the nation's capital.

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18. National Museum of Women in the Arts

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The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA), located in Washington, D. C. , is "the first museum in the world solely dedicated" to championing women through the arts. NMWA was incorporated in 1981 by Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay. Since opening in 1987, the museum has acquired a collection of more than 5,500 works by more than 1,000 artists, ranging from the 16th century to today. The collection includes works by Frida Kahlo, Mary Cassatt, Alma Woodsey Thomas, Élisabeth Louise Vigée-LeBrun, and Amy Sherald. NMWA also holds the only painting by Frida Kahlo in Washington, D. C.

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19. Henry Clay

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Henry Clay Julian Vannerson or Montgomery P. Simons / Public domain

Henry Clay Sr. was an American attorney and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the U. S. Senate and House of Representatives. He was the seventh House speaker as well as the ninth secretary of state, also receiving electoral votes for president in the 1824, 1832, and 1844 presidential elections. He helped found both the National Republican Party and the Whig Party. For his role in defusing sectional crises, he earned the appellation of the "Great Compromiser" and was part of the "Great Triumvirate" of Congressmen, alongside fellow Whig Daniel Webster and John C. Calhoun.

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20. Major General Lafayette

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Major General Lafayette my photo of 3D public art / Public domain

Major General Marquis Gilbert de Lafayette is a statue in the southeast corner of Lafayette Square, in Washington, D. C. , near the junction of Pennsylvania Avenue with Madison Place and close to the White House. The statue was erected in 1891 to honor Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette and his contribution in the American Revolutionary War. The square, originally part of the President's Park, was named in honor of the Marquis in 1824. The statuary was made by Alexandre Falguière and Antonin Mercié, and the architect who designed the marble pedestal was Paul Pujol.

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21. Statue of Freedom

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Statue of Freedom Statue by Thomas Crawford (22 March 1814 – 10 October 1857)
Photo by Architect of the Capitol / Public domain

The Statue of Freedom, also known as Armed Freedom or simply Freedom, is a bronze statue designed by Thomas Crawford (1814–1857) that, since 1863, has crowned the dome of the U. S. Capitol building in Washington, D. C. Originally named Freedom Triumphant in War and Peace, a U. S. government publication now states that the statue "is officially known as the Statue of Freedom. " The statue depicts a Native American female figure bearing a military helmet and holding a sheathed sword in her right hand and a laurel wreath and shield in her left.

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22. Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral

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Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral was founded as a church in 1904 to serve the Greek Orthodox residents of the District of Columbia. In 1962, the church was elevated to a cathedral under the jurisdiction of the Archbishop of America in New York City and serves as his cathedral in Washington. The church is not named for Saint Sophia the martyr, but rather the Holy Wisdom of God in the tradition of Hagia Sophia of Constantinople. The building is in the Neo-Byzantine style with a central dome that reaches 80 ft (24 m) in height.

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23. Calvary Baptist Church

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Calvary Baptist Church is a Baptist church located in the Chinatown neighborhood in Washington, D. C. affiliated with the American Baptist Churches USA, the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, the Baptist Peace Fellowship of North America, the Alliance of Baptists, the District of Columbia Baptist Convention, and the Association of Welcoming and Affirming Baptists. It severed ties with the Southern Baptist Convention in July 2012. Since 2017, Calvary's Senior Co-Pastors have been Rev. Sally Sarratt and Rev. Maria Swearingen.

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24. All Hallows Guild Traveling Carousel

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The All Hallows Guild Carousel or simply the Traveling Carousel is a historic carousel housed at the National Cathedral in Washington, D. C. since 1963. Previously, it was a "county fair" carousel operated by Clifford Sandretzky as part of a traveling carnival based in the northern Virginia area. The rare all-wood carousel was likely built in the 1890s by the Merry-Go-Round Company of Cincinnati and has a rare caliola with brass pipes that was built by the Rudolph Wurlitzer Company of North Tonawanda, New York in 1937.

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25. Octagon House

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Octagon House Steveturphotg / Public domain

The Octagon House, also known as the Colonel John Tayloe III House, is located at 1799 New York Avenue, Northwest in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D. C. After the British destroyed the White House during the War of 1812, the house served as the temporary residence of James Madison, President of the United States, for a period of six months. It is one of only four houses to serve as the Presidential residence in the history of the United States of America and one of only two that still stand today.

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26. Theodorick Bland

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Theodorick Bland / Public domain

Theodorick Bland, also known as Theodorick Bland, Jr., was an American slave owner, planter, physician, soldier, and politician from Prince George County, Virginia. He became a major figure in the formation of the new United States government, representing Virginia in both the Continental Congress and the United States House of Representatives, as well as serving multiple terms in the Virginia House of Delegates representing Prince George County, which he also represented in the Virginia Ratification Convention.

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27. Marian Koshland Science Museum

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The Marian Koshland Science Museum of the U. S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) was located in Washington, D. C. from 2004 until 2017. It featured exhibits that presented modern science and scientific issues in an accessible way, geared for the general public. It explored current scientific issues that were important for the nation's and world's public policy decisions, as presented in reports by the United States National Academies. The National Academy of Sciences replaced the museum with LabX.

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28. Theodore-Roosevelt Island

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Theodore Roosevelt Island is an 88. 5-acre (358,000 m2) island and national memorial located in the Potomac River in Washington, D. C. During the Civil War, it was used as a training camp for the United States Colored Troops. The island was given to the federal government by the Theodore Roosevelt Association in memory of the 26th president, Theodore Roosevelt. Until then, the island had been known as My Lord's Island, Barbadoes Island, Mason's Island, Analostan Island, and Anacostine Island.

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29. Church of the Ascension and Saint Agnes

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The Church of the Ascension and Saint Agnes is an Episcopal church building located at 1215 Massachusetts Avenue in Northwest Washington, D. C. , US. The current structure built in 1874 as the Church of the Ascension was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. In the late 1940s, the Church of the Ascension merged with the nearby St. Agnes Episcopal Church and adopted its present name, under which it has continued as an active parish in the Episcopal Diocese of Washington.

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30. Major General James B. McPherson

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Major General James B. McPherson Ben Schumin (photographer); Louis Rebisso (sculptor) / CC BY-SA 3.0

Major General James B. McPherson is a public artwork by American artist Louis Rebisso, located at McPherson Square in Washington, D. C. , United States. Major General James B. McPherson was originally surveyed as part of the Smithsonian's Save Outdoor Sculpture! survey in 1993. The monument is a bronze equestrian statue of Civil War hero James B. McPherson. The statue is a contributing monument to the Civil War Monuments in Washington, DC, of the National Register of Historic Places.

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31. Vietnam Veterans Memorial

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The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a U. S. national memorial in Washington, D. C. , honoring service members of the U. S. armed forces who fought in the Vietnam War. The 2-acre (8,100 m2) site is dominated by a black granite wall engraved with the names of those service members who died as a result of their service in Vietnam and South East Asia during the war. The wall, completed in 1982, has since been supplemented with the statue The Three Soldiers and the Vietnam Women's Memorial.

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32. Adas Israel Congregation

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Adas Israel, is located in the Cleveland Park neighborhood, It is the largest Conservative synagogue in Washington, D. C. President Ulysses S. Grant, and acting Vice-President Thomas W. Ferry attended the dedication of its first building in 1876, the first time a sitting United States President had attended a synagogue service. The original structure is the oldest surviving synagogue building in Washington, D. C. , and today known as the Lillian & Albert Small Jewish Museum.

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33. Major General John A. Rawlins Statue

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The statue of John Aaron Rawlins, a United States Army general who served during the Civil War and later as Secretary of War, is a focal point of Rawlins Park, a small public park in Washington, D. C. 's Foggy Bottom neighborhood. It was installed in 1874, but relocated several times between 1880 and 1931. The statue was sculpted by French-American artist Joseph A. Bailly, whose best known work is the statue of George Washington in front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

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34. Alexander Dallas Bache

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The Alexander Dallas Bache Monument is the tomb of Alexander Dallas Bache, a noted American scientist and surveyor. Bache died in Newport, Rhode Island in 1867 and was transported to Washington, DC's Congressional Cemetery for burial. American architect Henry Hobson Richardson was commissioned to build a tomb in 1868. The tomb is one of only three examples of a monument designed by Richardson and a rare example of a Richardson structure lacking Romanesque design points.

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35. Emancipation Hall

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Emancipation Hall U.S. Government / Public domain

The United States Capitol Visitor Center (CVC) is a large underground addition to the United States Capitol complex which serves as a gathering point for up to 4,000 tourists and an expansion space for the US Congress. It is located below the East Front of the Capitol and its plaza, between the Capitol building and 1st Street East. The complex contains 580,000 square feet (54,000 m2) of space below ground on three floors. The overall project's budget was $621 million.

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36. Saint Peter's Catholic Church

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St. Peter's Church, also referred to as St. Peter's on Capitol Hill, is a Roman Catholic church located on Capitol Hill in Washington, D. C. , within the Archdiocese of Washington. Founded in 1820, St. Peter's is the second oldest Catholic parish in the City of Washington. The church building was originally constructed in 1889. However, it was destroyed by a fire in 1940 and rebuilt. The church's motto is, "To be a tangible manifestation of Christ in the community. "

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37. United States Capitol

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United States Capitol Martin Falbisoner / CC BY-SA 3.0

The United States Capitol, often called The Capitol or the Capitol Building, is the meeting place of the United States Congress and the seat of the legislative branch of the U. S. federal government. It is located on Capitol Hill at the eastern end of the National Mall in Washington, D. C. Though no longer at the geographic center of the federal district, the Capitol forms the origin point for the district's street-numbering system and the district's four quadrants.

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38. Bryce Park

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Bryce Park is an urban triangle park located in the District of Columbia neighborhood of Cathedral Heights; formed by the intersection of Massachusetts Ave., Wisconsin Ave. and Garfield St., NW. This 0.59 acre site is administered by the National Park Service as a part of Rock Creek Park, but is not contiguous with that park. Situated across Massachusetts Ave, NW from the Washington National Cathedral, the park provides pathways and benches for area pedestrians.

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39. Alexander Pushkin

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Alexander Pushkin Original work: Alexander Bourganov
Depiction: unknown / Fair use

Alexander Pushkin is a bronze statue by Alexander Bourganov. It is located at the corner of 22nd Street and H Street, N. W. Washington D. C. on the campus of George Washington University. It was erected as part of a cultural exchange between the cities of Moscow and Washington; in 2009, a statue of the American poet Walt Whitman was erected in Moscow. Pushkin's statue is said to be the first monument commemorating a Russian literary figure in the United States.

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40. Anderson House

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Anderson House, also known as Larz Anderson House, is a Gilded Age mansion located at 2118 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, on Embassy Row in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D. C. It now houses the Society of the Cincinnati's international headquarters and a research library on 17th- and 18th-century military and naval history and the art of war. It is also open to the public as a historic house museum about life in Washington in the early 20th century.

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41. Adams Memorial

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The Adams Memorial is a grave marker for Marian Hooper Adams and Henry Adams located in Section E of Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D. C. , featuring a cast bronze allegorical sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The shrouded figure is seated against a granite block which forms one side of a hexagonal plaza, designed by architect Stanford White. Across from the statue is a stone bench for visitors. The whole is sheltered by a close screen of dense conifers.

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42. Saint Aloysius Gonzaga Church

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St. Aloysius Catholic Church is a Roman Catholic parish church at 19 I Street in the Near Northeast neighborhood of Washington, D. C. It is administered by the Jesuits since its founding and is named for St. Aloysius Gonzaga. It is often associated with Gonzaga College High School, to which it is physically connected. The church building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 2012 the parish was closed and merged with Holy Redeemer church.

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43. Taras Shevchenko Statue

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Taras Shevchenko Statue Carol M. Highsmith / Public domain

The Taras Shevchenko Memorial is a bronze statue and stone relief-adorned wall located on the 2200 block of P Street NW in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D. C. , United States. It is one of many monuments in Washington, D. C. that honor foreign heroes who symbolize freedom in their native countries. The memorial honors Taras Shevchenko (1814–1861), a Ukrainian poet and artist who influenced the development of modern Ukrainian literature.

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44. Martin Luther Statue

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Martin Luther Statue Slowking4 / Public domain

The Luther Monument is a public artwork located at Luther Place Memorial Church in Washington, D. C. , United States. The monument to Martin Luther, the theologian and Protestant Reformer, is a bronze full-length portrait. It is a copy of the statue created by Ernst Friedrich August Rietschel as part of the 1868 Luther Monument in Worms, Germany. The monument was originally surveyed as part of the Smithsonian's Save Outdoor Sculpture! survey in 1993.

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45. Congressional Cemetery

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The Congressional Cemetery, officially Washington Parish Burial Ground, is a historic and active cemetery located at 1801 E Street, SE, in Washington, D. C. , on the west bank of the Anacostia River. It is the only American "cemetery of national memory" founded before the Civil War. Over 65,000 individuals are buried or memorialized at the cemetery, including many who helped form the nation and the city of Washington in the early 19th century.

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46. Decatur House

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Decatur House Tim1965 / Public domain

Decatur House is a historic house museum at 748 Jackson Place in Washington, D. C. , the capital of the United States. It is named after its first owner and occupant Stephen Decatur. The house is located at the northwest corner of Lafayette Square, at the southwest corner of Jackson Place and H Street, near the White House. A museum, it now serves as the National Center for White House History, managed by the White House Historical Association.

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47. Church of the Pilgrims

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The Church of the Pilgrims is a Presbyterian Church (USA) congregation located in Washington, D. C. , in the United States. The congregation was founded in 1903 as the Second Southern Presbyterian Church and took its current name in 1919. The congregation resides in a Gothic Revival church located at 22nd Street NW and P Street NW. The building was designed by architect Benjamin C. Flournoy of Baltimore, Maryland, and completed in March 1929.

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48. Tom Lantos

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Tom Lantos U.S. Congress / Public domain

Thomas Peter Lantos was a Holocaust survivor and American politician who served as a U. S. representative from California from 1981 until his death in 2008. A member of the Democratic Party, he represented the state's 11th congressional district until 1993 and from then the 12th congressional district, which both included the northern two-thirds of San Mateo County and a portion of the southwestern part of San Francisco after redistricting.

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49. Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens

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Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens is a decorative arts museum in Washington, D. C. , United States. The former residence of businesswoman, socialite, philanthropist and collector Marjorie Merriweather Post, Hillwood is known for its large decorative arts collection that focuses heavily on the House of Romanov, including Fabergé eggs. Other highlights are 18th- and 19th-century French art and one of the country's finest orchid collections.

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50. Farragut Square

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Farragut Square is a city square in Washington, D. C. 's Ward 2. It is bordered by K Street NW to the north, I Street NW to the south, on the east and west by segments of 17th Street NW, and interrupts Connecticut Avenue NW. It is the sister park of McPherson Square two blocks east. It is serviced by two stops on the Washington Metro rail system: Farragut North on the Red Line and Farragut West on the Blue, Orange, and Silver Lines.

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51. Saint Lukes Episcopal Church

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St. Luke's Episcopal Church is a historic Episcopal church located at 1514 15th Street, N. W. , in Washington, D. C. Completed in 1879, it is home to the oldest African-American Episcopal congregation in the city. It was designated a U. S. National Historic Landmark in 1976 for its association with Rev. Alexander Crummell (1819–1898), a leading figure advocating black self-sufficiency and civil rights in the mid-19th century.

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52. Are Years What? (for Marianne Moore)

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Are Years What? is a sculpture by American artist Mark di Suvero. It is in the collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, in Washington, D. C. , United States. The sculpture is named after poet Marianne Moore's "What Are Years". From May 22, 2013 through May 26, 2014, the sculpture resided temporarily in San Francisco, as part of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's Mark di Suvero exhibition at Crissy Field.

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53. Frances Perkins House

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The Frances Perkins House is a historic house at 2326 California Street NW in Washington, D. C. Built in 1914, it was from 1937 to 1940 the home of Frances Perkins (1880-1965), the first woman to serve in the United States Cabinet. Perkins was the Secretary of Labor under president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and was a major force in advancing his New Deal agenda. This house was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1991.

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54. Dacor Bacon House Museum

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The Ringgold–Carroll House is a historic residence located at 1801 F St Northwest, Washington, D. C. One of the finest of the few remaining examples of Federal period residential architecture in the neighborhood of the White House, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It has been adapted from a historic home into a private club and office space by DACOR and the DACOR-Bacon House Foundation.

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55. First Baptist Church of the City of Washington

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The First Baptist Church of the City of Washington, D. C. is a Baptist church at 1328 16th Street NW, nine blocks north of the White House. It is affiliated with the District of Columbia Baptist Convention. The church is also considered the parent organization to the First Colored Baptist Church of Washington, D. C. which was later renamed Nineteenth Street Baptist Church. It was originally organized in 1801.

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56. Renwick Gallery

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Renwick Gallery Tony Hisgett from Birmingham, UK / CC BY 2.0

The Renwick Gallery is a branch of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, located in Washington, D. C. , and focuses on American craft and decorative arts from the 19th to the 21st century. It is housed in a National Historic Landmark building that was begun in 1859 on Pennsylvania Avenue and originally housed the Corcoran Gallery of Art. When it was built in 1859, it was known as "the American Louvre".

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57. Abraham Lincoln

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Abraham Lincoln Daniel Chester French / Public domain

Abraham Lincoln (1920) is a colossal seated figure of the 16th President of the United States Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865) sculpted by Daniel Chester French (1850–1931) and carved by the Piccirilli Brothers. It is in the Lincoln Memorial, on the National Mall, Washington, D. C. , United States, and was unveiled in 1922. The work follows in the Beaux Arts and American Renaissance style traditions.

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58. Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk Statue

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Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk is an outdoor sculpture depicting Tomáš Masaryk, the founding President of Czechoslovakia. It was offered to the United States by the Czech Republic and was inaugurated on Embassy Row on 19 September 2002 in the presence of Czech President Václav Havel, former Slovak President Michal Kováč, and Prague-born former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.

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59. Samuel Gompers Statute

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The Samuel Gompers Memorial is a bronze statue in Washington, D. C. , listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is located at the intersection of 10th Street, L Street, and Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D. C. The statue is in memory of Samuel Gompers, an English-born American cigar maker, labor union leader and a key figure in American labor history.

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60. Bishop John Carroll

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Bishop John Carroll Daderot / Public domain

Bishop John Carroll is a statue by the sculptor Jerome Connor commemorating Archbishop John Carroll, the founder of Georgetown University and the first Catholic bishop in the United States. Located in front of Healy Hall, on university's campus in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D. C. , the statue consists of a bronze sculpture of Carroll on top of a granite pedestal.

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61. National Baptist Memorial Church

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National Baptist Memorial Church is a Baptist church in Washington, D. C. It is located at the intersection of 16th Street NW and Columbia Road, where the Mt. Pleasant, Columbia Heights and Adams Morgan neighborhoods meet. The crossroads is notable for the triple steeples of National Baptist Memorial Church, All Souls Unitarian Church and the Unification Church's cathedral.

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62. James Jackson

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James Jackson Library of Congress? / Public domain

James Jackson was an early British-born Georgia politician of the Democratic-Republican Party. He was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from 1789 until 1791. He was also a U. S. Senator from Georgia from 1793 to 1795, and from 1801 until his death in 1806. In 1797 he was elected 23rd Governor of Georgia, serving from 1798 to 1801 before returning to the senate.

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63. John Ericsson National Memorial

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John Ericsson National Memorial Dan Vera
  • / Public domain
  • John Ericsson Memorial, located near the National Mall at Ohio Drive and Independence Avenue, SW, in Washington, D. C. , is dedicated to the man who revolutionized naval history with his invention of the screw propeller. The Swedish engineer John Ericsson was also the designer of USS Monitor, the ship that ensured Union naval supremacy during the American Civil War.

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    64. James A. Garfield Monument

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    James A. Garfield Monument Daderot / Public domain

    The James A. Garfield Monument stands on the grounds of the United States Capitol in the circle at First Street, S. W. , and Maryland Avenue, Washington, D. C. It is a memorial to United States President James A. Garfield, elected in 1880 and assassinated in 1881 after serving only four months of his term, by a disgruntled office-seeker named Charles J. Guiteau.

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    65. Clamdigger

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    Clamdigger is a bronze sculpture by Willem de Kooning. It may have been inspired by "the men who dug for clams along the beaches" near his home in East Hampton, New York. It has been described as one of his "extraordinarily tactile figurative sculptures" that "seemed pulled from the primordial ooze," and "as part man, part creature of the mud and the shallows."

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    66. Ford's Theatre National Historic Site

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    Ford's Theatre is a theater located in Washington, D. C. , which opened in August 1863. It is infamous for being the site of the assassination of United States President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. After being shot in the head, the fatally wounded 56-year-old Lincoln was carried across the street to the Petersen House, where he died the next morning.

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    67. William H. Emory

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    William H. Emory Mathew Benjamin Brady / Public domain

    William Hemsley Emory was a prominent American surveyor and civil engineer in the 19th century. As an officer in the U. S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers he specialized in mapping the United States border, including the Texas–Mexico border, and the Gadsden Purchase border, 1844–1855, and published lasting scientific reports on the border region.

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    68. Saint John's Episcopal Church

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    Saint John's Episcopal Church Carol M. Highsmith / Public domain

    St. John's Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square is an historic Episcopal church located at Sixteenth Street and H Street NW, in Washington, D. C. , along Black Lives Matter Plaza. The Greek Revival building, designed by Benjamin Latrobe, is adjacent to Lafayette Square, one block from the White House. It is often called the "Church of the Presidents".

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    69. Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

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    Arthur M. Sackler Gallery TimothyJ / CC BY 2.0

    The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery is an art museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D. C. , focusing on Asian art. The Sackler Gallery and the Freer Gallery of Art together form the Smithsonian's national museums of Asian art in the United States. The Freer and Sackler galleries house the largest Asian art research library in the country.

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    70. The Mall

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    The National Mall is a landscaped park within the National Mall and Memorial Parks, an official unit of the United States National Park System. It is located near the downtown area of Washington, D. C. , the capital city of the United States, and is administered by the National Park Service (NPS) of the United States Department of the Interior.

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    71. Franklin Square

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    Franklin Square is a square in downtown Washington, D. C. Purportedly named after Benjamin Franklin, it is bounded by K Street NW to the north, 13th Street NW on the east, I Street NW on the south, and 14th Street NW on the west. It is served by the McPherson Square station of the Washington Metro, which is located just southwest of the park.

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    72. President Lincoln's Cottage

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    President Lincoln's Cottage Carol M. Highsmith / Public domain

    President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument, sometimes shortened to President Lincoln's Cottage, is a national monument on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home, known today as the Armed Forces Retirement Home. It is located near Brookland in Washington, D. C. President Lincoln's Cottage was formerly known as Anderson Cottage.

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    73. Pushmataha

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    Pushmataha Charles Bird King / Public domain

    Pushmataha, the "Indian General", was one of the three regional chiefs of the major divisions of the Choctaw in the 19th century. Many historians considered him the "greatest of all Choctaw chiefs". Pushmataha was highly regarded among Native Americans, Europeans, and white Americans, for his skill and cunning in both war and diplomacy.

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    74. Homeless Jesus

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    Homeless Jesus, also known as Jesus the Homeless, is a bronze sculpture by Canadian sculptor Timothy Schmalz depicting Jesus as a homeless person, sleeping on a park bench. The original sculpture was installed at Regis College, University of Toronto, in early 2013. Other casts have since been installed at many places across the world.

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    75. Joseph Nicollet

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    Joseph Nicollet uncredited / Public domain

    Joseph Nicolas Nicollet, also known as Jean-Nicolas Nicollet, was a French geographer, astronomer, and mathematician known for mapping the Upper Mississippi River basin during the 1830s. Nicollet led three expeditions in the region between the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, primarily in Minnesota, South Dakota, and North Dakota.

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    76. Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Monument

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    The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal commemorative obelisk is an 8-foot (2. 4 m) marble obelisk erected in 1850 in Washington, D. C. , to mark the completion of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal to Cumberland, Maryland. It stands on the northwest corner of the Wisconsin Avenue Bridge over the canal in Washington's Georgetown neighborhood.

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    77. Dumbarton Oaks Park

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    The Dumbarton Oaks Park is a public park, located in the 3100 block of R Street, Northwest, Washington, D. C. , in the Georgetown neighborhood. Access is via Lovers' Lane from R Street, east of 32nd Street. It is located near Dumbarton Oaks, Montrose Park, and Oak Hill Cemetery. It is part of the Georgetown Historic District.

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    78. Saint Anselms Abbey

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    St. Anselm's Abbey is a Benedictine Abbey located at 4501 South Dakota Avenue, N. E. , in Washington, D. C. It operates the boys' middle and high school St. Anselm's Abbey School, which was ranked by the Washington Post as the most challenging in Washington, D. C. , and as the most challenging private high school in the U. S.

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    79. Ukrainian Catholic National Shrine of the Holy Family

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    The Ukrainian Catholic National Shrine of the Holy Family is a Catholic church located near University Heights, Washington, D. C. The shrine is part of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, a sui iuris Eastern Catholic church in communion with the Bishop of Rome. The shrine is administered by the Archeparchy of Philadelphia.

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    80. (Here I Stand) In the Spirit of Paul Robeson

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    (Here I Stand) in the Spirit of Paul Robeson is a public artwork by American artist Allen Uzikee Nelson, located at the intersection of Kansas Ave NW, Georgia Ave NW and Varnum St NW in the Petworth neighborhood in Washington, D. C. , United States. It is a tribute to musician, actor and social activist Paul Robeson.

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    81. An Entrance to the Paris Métropolitain

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    An Entrance to the Paris Métropolitain is a sculpture by Hector Guimard, conceived in 1902 and fabricated between 1902 and 1913. Guimard designed 141 entrances to the Paris Métro of varying types, 86 of which are still standing. One is featured at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden in Washington, D. C.

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    82. Edmund Burke Statue

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    Edmund Burke is a bronze full length statue of Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist and philosopher Edmund Burke by British artist James Havard Thomas. The original is in Bristol, England, with a second cast on Massachusetts Avenue at 11th and "L" Streets, NW, in Washington, D. C. , United States.

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    83. The Phillips Collection

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    The Phillips Collection is an art museum founded by Duncan Phillips and Marjorie Acker Phillips in 1921 as the Phillips Memorial Gallery located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D. C. Phillips was the grandson of James H. Laughlin, a banker and co-founder of the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company.

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    84. Nineteenth Street Baptist Church

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    The Nineteenth Street Baptist Church, located on 16th Street, NW, is considered to be the first and oldest black Baptist congregation in Washington, D. C. Since its founding in 1839, the church has figured prominently within the historical and social fabric of Washington, D. C. 's African American community.

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    85. Elbridge Gerry

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    Elbridge Gerry Nathaniel Jocelyn / Public domain

    Elbridge Gerry was an American Founding Father, politician, and diplomat who served as the fifth vice president of the United States under President James Madison from 1813 until his death in 1814. The political practice of gerrymandering is named after him. He was the second vice president to die in office.

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    86. Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument

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    The Belmont–Paul Women's Equality National Monument is a historic house and museum of the U. S. women's suffrage and equal rights movements located in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D. C. The monument is named after suffragists and National Woman's Party leaders Alva Belmont and Alice Paul.

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    87. National City Christian Church

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    National City Christian Church, located on Thomas Circle in Washington, D. C. , is the national church of the Christian Church. The denomination grew out of the Stone-Campbell Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky.

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    88. Stead Recreation Center

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    Stead Recreation Center Ben Schumin / CC BY-SA 3.0

    Stead Park is a 1. 5-acre municipal park located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Northwest Washington, D. C. Among its facilities are Stead Recreation Center, located at 1625 P Street NW; a lighted basketball court; an athletic field with a 60-foot (18 m) baseball diamond; and a playground.

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    89. Saint Marks Episcopal Church

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    St. Mark's Episcopal Church, also known as St. Mark's, Capitol Hill, is a historic Episcopal church located at 3rd and A Streets, Southeast in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D. C. Built 1888–1894, the church is an example of Gothic Revival and Romanesque Revival architectures.

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    90. Twin Oaks

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    Twin Oaks dbking from Washington, DC / CC BY 2.0

    The Twin Oaks is a 17-acre estate located in the Cleveland Park neighborhood in Washington, D. C. , United States. It was the residence of nine Republic of China ambassadors to the United States before the United States broke off diplomatic ties to the Republic of China on Taiwan in 1979.

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    91. National Presbyterian Church

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    The National Presbyterian Church is a Christian congregation of approximately 1,500 members of all ages from the greater metropolitan Washington, D. C. , area. The mission statement of the church is "Leading People to Become Faithful Followers of Jesus Christ Together in God’s World"

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    92. National Capitol Columns

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    The National Capitol Columns are a monument in Washington, D. C. 's National Arboretum. It is an arrangement of twenty-two Corinthian columns which were a part of the United States Capitol from 1828 to 1958, placed amid 20 acres (8. 1 ha) of open meadow, known as the Ellipse Meadow.

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    93. John Gould Stephenson

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    John Gould Stephenson Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

    John Gould Stephenson was an American physician and soldier. He was the fifth Librarian of the United States Congress from 1861 to 1864. He was referred to as the "librarian of the Civil War era" because Stephenson's tenure of librarianship covered almost the entire length of the war.

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    94. William Wirt

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    William Wirt James Barton Longacre (1794-1869) - engraver. / Public domain

    William Wirt was an American author and statesman who is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence. He was the longest serving Attorney General in U. S. history. He was also the Anti-Masonic nominee for president in the 1832 election.

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    95. Japanese American Memorial

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    Japanese American Memorial David from Washington, DC / CC BY 2.0

    The Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism During World War II is a National Park Service site to commemorate the contributions of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and their parents who patriotically supported the United States despite unjust treatment during World War II.

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    96. Major General Rochambeau

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    Major General Comte Jean de Rochambeau is a bronze statue by Fernand Hamar which honors Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, a French nobleman and general who played a major role in helping the Thirteen Colonies win independence during the American Revolution.

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    97. Anna Thornton

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    Anna Thornton Gilbert Stuart / Public domain

    Anna Maria Brodeau Thornton (1775?-1865) was a prominent Washington, D. C. , socialite, diarist, and the wife of architect William Thornton, who designed the first United States Capitol building. She rubbed shoulders with figures such as George Washington and Dolley Madison.

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    98. Three Servicemen Statue

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    The Three Soldiers is a bronze statue by Frederick Hart. Unveiled on Veterans Day, November 11, 1984, on the National Mall, it is part of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial commemorating the Vietnam War. It was the first representation of an African American on the National Mall.

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    99. Archibald Henderson

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    Archibald Henderson was the longest-serving Commandant of the Marine Corps, serving from 1820 to 1859. His name is learned by all recruits at Marine recruit training as the "Grand old man of the Marine Corps," serving in the United States Marine Corps for over 52 years.

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    100. DAR Museum

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    DAR Museum Daderot / Public domain

    The DAR Museum, run by the Daughters of the American Revolution, is an art and history museum in Washington, D. C. The museum is located in Memorial Continental Hall, just down the street from DAR Constitution Hall, where some of the museum's concerts take place.

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    Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.