46 Sights in Portland, United States (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Portland, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 46 sights are available in Portland, United States.

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1. Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park

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Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park is a 36.59-acre (148,100 m2) park located in downtown Portland, Oregon, along the Willamette River. After the 1974 removal of Harbor Drive, a major milestone in the freeway removal movement, the park was opened to the public in 1978. The park covers 13 tax lots and is owned by the City of Portland. The park was renamed in 1984 to honor Tom McCall, the Oregon governor who pledged his support for the beautification of the west bank of the Willamette River—harkening back to the City Beautiful plans at the turn of the century which envisioned parks and greenways along the river. The park is bordered by RiverPlace to the south, the Steel Bridge to the north, Naito Parkway to the west, and Willamette River to the east. In October 2012, Waterfront Park was voted one of America's ten greatest public spaces by the American Planning Association.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

2. Inversion +/-

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Inversion +/- Original work: Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo
Depiction: Another Believer / CC-BY-SA-4.0

Inversion: Plus Minus is a pair of outdoor sculptures designed by artists and architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo, located in southeast Portland, Oregon. The sculptures, constructed from weathered steel angle iron, are sited near the Morrison Bridge and Hawthorne Bridge along Southeast Grand Avenue and represent "ghosts" of former buildings. The installation on Belmont Street emphasizes "negative space" while the sculpture on Hawthorne Street appears as a more solid matrix of metal. According to the artists, the works are reminiscent of industrial buildings that existed on the project sites historically. Inversion was funded by the two percent for art ordinance as part of the expansion of the Eastside Portland Streetcar line and is managed by the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

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3. Portland Art Museum

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The Portland Art Museum in Portland, Oregon, United States, was founded in 1892, making it one of the oldest art museums on the West Coast and seventh oldest in the US. Upon completion of the most recent renovations, the Portland Art Museum became one of the 25 largest art museums in the US, at a total of 240,000 square feet, with more than 112,000 square feet of gallery space. The permanent collection has more than 42,000 works of art, and at least one major traveling exhibition is usually on show. The Portland Art Museum features a center for Native American art, a center for Northwest art, a center for modern and contemporary art, permanent exhibitions of Asian art, and an outdoor public sculpture garden. The Northwest Film Center is also a component of Portland Art Museum.

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4. Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial

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Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial Christopher from Portland, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Oregon Vietnam Veterans Memorial is an 8-acre (0. 03 km2) outdoor war memorial dedicated to Oregonians who served in the Vietnam War. It is located in Portland, Oregon's Washington Park at 45. 5120°N 122. 71857°W. The memorial was dedicated in 1987, inspired in 1982 by visits to the national Vietnam Veterans Memorial by five veterans and the parents of a Marine killed in Vietnam. Landscape architecture firm Walker Macy of Portland designed the memorial, while construction labor and materials were almost entirely volunteer donations. The font used in the memorial was created for the exclusive use of the Memorial. It was designed by Janis Price, and is called Hoyt, in recognition of the Arboretum.

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5. Soldiers Monument

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The Spanish–American War Soldier's Monument, also known as the Spanish–American War Memorial or simply Soldiers Monument, is an outdoor sculpture and war memorial monument honoring the dead of the 2nd Oregon Volunteer Infantry Regiment of the Spanish–American War and Philippine–American War. The monument was created by American artist Douglas Tilden and located in Lownsdale Square, in the Plaza Blocks of downtown Portland, Oregon. It features a bronze statue on a marble pedestal and granite base. The monument is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

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6. Awning

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Awning Original work: Douglas Senft
Depiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Awning is an outdoor 1976 painted aluminum sculpture by Canadian artist Douglas Senft, located near Southwest 3rd Avenue and Southwest Market Street in downtown Portland, Oregon. The 60-foot (18 m) sculpture was selected and funded by the Portland Development Commission from more than 200 proposals in a request for art intended to "humanize the modern architecture" of the Portland Center. Senft was 26 years old when Awning was installed. It is part of the collection of the Regional Arts & Culture Council. The yellow-colored work is mounted to the side of 200 Market along a pedestrian trail that serves as an extension of Third Avenue.

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7. People's Bike Library of Portland

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People's Bike Library of Portland Original work: Brian Borrello and Vanessa Renwick
Depiction: Another Believer / Fair use

People's Bike Library of Portland, also known as Zoobomb Pyle or simply "the pile", is a 2009 steel and gold leaf sculpture by local artists Brian Borrello and Vanessa Renwick, located in Portland, Oregon, in the United States. It was erected in collaboration with the Zoobomb bicycling collective, and serves as a bicycle parking rack, a "lending library" for weekly bike riders, and a monument to the city's bike culture. The sculpture features a two-story spiral pillar with a gold-plated small bicycle on top; bicycles intended for Zoobomb riders are locked to the pillar and base, which has metal loops serving as hooks.

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8. Animals in Pools

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Animals in Pools Kevin Noone from Portland, USA / CC BY 2.0

Animals in Pools is a series of fountains and bronze sculptures of Pacific Northwest animals, designed by American artist Georgia Gerber and located in Portland, Oregon, in the United States. The series was installed in 1986 as part of the renovations associated with construction of the MAX Light Rail. Funded by the Downtown Merchants Local Improvement District, TriMet and the United States Department of Transportation, the sculptures were presented as gifts to the city and remain part of the collection of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

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9. Portland Fire Museum

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The Portland Fire Museum is a fire museum in Portland, Maine. Located at 157 Spring Street in the former home of Fire Engine 4, the museum is operated by the Portland Veteran Firemen's Association (PVFA). It showcases the history of firefighting in Portland, including a number of retired firetrucks. The PVFA was originally located at the headquarters of Casco Engine 1 which was located at 19 South Street across from what is now the Cumberland County Civic Center. The building at 19 South Street was demolished during the building of the Spring Street arterial and the PVFA moved west to the 157 Spring Street location.

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10. Portland Observatory

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The Portland Observatory is a historic maritime signal tower at 138 Congress Street in the Munjoy Hill section of Portland, Maine. Built in 1807, it is the only known surviving tower of its type in the United States. Using both a telescope and signal flags, two-way communication between ship and shore was possible several hours before an incoming vessel reached the docks. The tower was designated a National Historic Landmark and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 2006; it is now managed by Greater Portland Landmarks, a local historic preservation nonprofit. It is open to the public as a museum.

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11. Kvinneakt

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Kvinneakt Original work: Norman J. Taylor
Depiction: brx0 / Fair use

Kvinneakt is an abstract bronze sculpture located on the Transit Mall of downtown Portland, Oregon. Designed and created by Norman J. Taylor between 1973 and 1975, the work was funded by TriMet and the United States Department of Transportation and was installed on the Transit Mall in 1977. The following year Kvinneakt appeared in the "Expose Yourself to Art" poster which featured future Mayor of Portland Bud Clark flashing the sculpture. It remained in place until November 2006 when it was removed temporarily during renovation of the Transit Mall and the installation of the MAX Light Rail on the mall.

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12. Neal Dow House

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Neal Dow House Thomas.macmillan / Public domain

The Neal Dow House, also known as Gen. Neal Dow House, is an historic house found at 714 Congress Street in Portland, Maine. It was built in 1829 for noted politician and prohibitionist Neal Dow (1804-1897), and was later designated a National Historic Landmark for that association. Dow was the author of the first prohibition law passed by the Maine legislature in 1851. He was known as a tireless, internationally known activist for the temperance movement. Dow's house was a center of activism in his lifetime, and is now the headquarters of the Maine chapter of the Women's Christian Temperance Union.

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13. Constellation: Isolated Molecule for a Good Neighborhood

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Constellation: Isolated Molecule for a Good Neighborhood Original work: Tad Savinar
Depiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Constellation is a series of outdoor 2000 bronze sculptures by American artist Tad Savinar, installed at Holladay Park in northeast Portland, Oregon, United States. The work's three "distinct elements" include:Constellation or Constellation: Flowers from a Neighborhood Garden, a slender vase of daisies, hydrangeas and other flowers; Constellation (Molecule) or Constellation: Isolated Molecule for a Good Neighborhood, an abstract molecule representing a "good neighborhood"; and Constellation: Neighborhood Gardiner or simply Constellation, a female figure carrying gardening shears.

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14. Lovejoy Columns

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Lovejoy Columns Visitor7 / Public domain

The Lovejoy Columns, located in Portland, Oregon, United States, supported the Lovejoy Ramp, a viaduct that from 1927 to 1999 carried the western approach to the Broadway Bridge over the freight tracks in what is now the Pearl District. The columns were painted by Greek immigrant Tom Stefopoulos between 1948 and 1952. In 1999, the viaduct was demolished but the columns were spared due to the efforts of the architectural group Rigga. For the next five years, attempts to restore the columns were unsuccessful and they remained in storage beneath the Fremont Bridge.

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15. Victoria Mansion

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Victoria Mansion, also known as the Morse-Libby House or Morse-Libby Mansion, is a landmark example of American residential architecture located in downtown Portland, Maine, United States. The brownstone exterior, elaborate interior design, opulent furnishings and early technological conveniences provide a detailed portrait of lavish living in nineteenth-century America. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1971 for its architectural significance as a particularly well-preserved Italianate mansion.

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16. Weather Machine

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Weather Machine is a lumino kinetic bronze sculpture and columnar machine that serves as a weather beacon, displaying a weather prediction each day at noon. Designed and constructed by Omen Design Group Inc., the approximately 30-foot-tall (9 m) sculpture was installed in 1988 in a corner of Pioneer Courthouse Square in Portland, Oregon, United States. Two thousand people attended its dedication, which was broadcast live nationally from the square by Today weatherman Willard Scott. The machine cost $60,000.

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17. Keller Fountain Park

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Keller Fountain Park is a city park in downtown Portland, Oregon. Originally named Forecourt Fountain or Auditorium Forecourt, the 0.92-acre (0.37 ha) park opened in 1970 across Third Avenue from what was then Civic Auditorium. In 1978, the park was renamed after Ira C. Keller, head of the Portland Development Commission (PDC) from 1958–1972. Civic Auditorium was renamed as Keller Auditorium in 2000, but is named in honor of Ira's son, Richard B. Keller.

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18. Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception

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The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception is a historic cathedral at 307 Congress Street in Portland, Maine that serves as seat of the Diocese of Portland. The pastor is Bishop Robert Deeley, and the rector is Father Seamus Griesbach. The church, an imposing Gothic Revival structure built in 1866–69, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. It is the tallest building in Portland and the third tallest in Maine.

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19. Driver's Seat

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Driver's Seat Original work: Don Merkt
Depiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Driver's Seat is a 1994 galvanized steel sculpture by Don Merkt, installed along the Transit Mall in Portland, Oregon's Old Town Chinatown neighborhood, in the United States. The artwork was funded by the City of Portland's Percent for Art program, the Portland Development Commission, and TriMet, and remains part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

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20. Facing the Crowd

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Facing the Crowd Michael Stutz (artwork only) / CC-BY-SA-3.0

Facing the Crowd is a series of two outdoor sculptures by American artist Michael Stutz, located outside of Providence Park in Portland, Oregon, in the United States. Composed of silicon bronze, the sculptures depict faces of a laughing man and a smiling boy. They were funded by the City of Portland's Percent for Art program and were installed in 2001, during a major remodel of the outdoor sports venue then known as PGE Park.

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21. Hoyt Arboretum

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Hoyt Arboretum is a public park in Portland, Oregon and is part of the complex of parks collectively known as Washington Park. The 189-acre (76 ha) arboretum is located atop a ridge in the Tualatin Mountains two miles (3.2 km) west of downtown Portland. Hoyt has 12 miles of hiking trails, two miles of accessibility paved trails, and is open free to the public all year. About 350,000 visitors per year visit the arboretum.

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22. Pittock Mansion

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The Pittock Mansion is a French Renaissance-style château in the West Hills of Portland, Oregon, United States. The mansion was originally built in 1914 as a private home for London-born Oregonian publisher Henry Pittock and his wife, Georgiana Burton Pittock. It is a 46-room estate built of Tenino Sandstone situated on 46 acres (19 ha) that is now owned by the city's Bureau of Parks and Recreation and open for touring.

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23. Salmon Street Springs

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Salmon Street Springs, or Salmon Street Fountain, is an outdoor water fountain at the intersection of Naito Parkway at Southwest Salmon in Tom McCall Waterfront Park in Portland, Oregon, United States. It was designed by Robert Perron Landscape Architects and Planners and dedicated in 1988. The fountain's three water displays, which are regulated by a computer, are called "bollards", "misters", and "wedding cake".

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24. Printing Press Park

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The Oregonian Printing Press Park, or simply Printing Press Park, is a triangular 1,000-square-foot park on the southeastern corner of the intersection of Southwest First Avenue and Morrison Street in Portland, Oregon, United States. The green space marks where editor Thomas J. Dryer operated a small press to publish Portland's weekly newspaper, which would become The Oregonian, beginning on December 4, 1850.

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25. John Ford Statue

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John Ford Statue / Public domain

John Martin Feeney, known professionally as John Ford, was an American film director and naval officer. He is renowned both for Westerns such as Stagecoach (1939), The Searchers (1956), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) and adaptations of classic 20th century American novels such as The Grapes of Wrath (1940). He was the recipient of six Academy Awards including a record four wins for Best Director.

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26. Grace

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The former Chestnut Street Methodist Church is an historic church building at 15 Chestnut Street in Portland, Maine. Built in 1856, it is rare in the city as an early example of Gothic Revival architecture, and is one of the few surviving works of Charles A. Alexander, a popular architect of the period. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. It now houses a restaurant.

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27. First Parish Portland Unitarian Universalist Church

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First Parish Church is an historic church at 425 Congress Street in Portland, Maine. Built in 1825 for a congregation established in 1674, it is the oldest church building in the city, and one of its finest examples of Federal period architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The congregation is Unitarian Universalist; its pastor is Reverend Christina Sillari.

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28. Lan Su Chinese Garden

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Lan Su Chinese Garden, formerly the Portland Classical Chinese Garden and titled the Garden of Awakening Orchids, is a walled Chinese garden enclosing a full city block, roughly 40,000 square feet (4,000 m2) in the Chinatown area of the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, United States. The garden is influenced by many of the famous classical gardens in Suzhou.

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29. Echo Gate

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Echo Gate Original work: Ean Eldred and the architectural firm Rigga
Depiction: User:Another Believer / Fair use

Echo Gate is an outdoor 2001 sculpture by Ean Eldred and the architectural firm Rigga, located along the Eastbank Esplanade in Portland, Oregon, United States. It was funded by the City of Portland Development Commission's Percent for Art program, and is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

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30. Portland Japanese Garden

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Portland Japanese Garden
OpenStreetMap contributors
/ CC BY-SA 2.0

The Portland Japanese Garden is a traditional Japanese garden occupying 12 acres, located within Washington Park in the West Hills of Portland, Oregon, United States. It is operated as a private non-profit organization, which leased the site from the city in the early 1960s. Stephen D. Bloom has been the chief executive officer of the Portland Japanese Garden since 2005.

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31. The Dreamer

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The Dreamer Original work: Manuel Izquierdo
Depiction: Another Believer / Fair use

The Dreamer, or simply Dreamer, is an outdoor 1979 muntz bronze sculpture and fountain of a reclining woman by Manuel Izquierdo, installed at Pettygrove Park in Portland, Oregon, United States. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

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32. Urban Hydrology

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Urban Hydrology Original work: Fernanda D'Agostino
Depiction: Another Believer / CC-BY-SA-4.0

Urban Hydrology is a series of twelve outdoor 2009 granite sculpture by Fernanda D'Agostino, installed along the Portland Transit Mall in Portland, Oregon, United States. The work is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

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33. Continuation

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Continuation Original work: Michihiro Kosuge
Depiction: Another Believer / CC-BY-SA-4.0

Continuation is an outdoor 2009 granite series of sculptures by Japanese artist Michihiro Kosuge, installed along Portland, Oregon's Transit Mall, in the United States. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

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34. Etz Chaim Synagogue

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Etz Chaim Synagogue is a synagogue in Portland, Maine. Located at 267 Congress Street, it is the only immigrant-era European-style synagogue remaining in Maine. It was founded in 1921 as an English-language synagogue, rather than a traditional Yiddish-language one. Gary S. Berenson presides as Rabbi of the congregation.

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35. Washington Park

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Washington Park is a public urban park in Portland in the U. S. state of Oregon. It includes a zoo, forestry museum, arboretum, rose garden, Japanese garden, amphitheatre, memorials, archery range, tennis courts, soccer field, picnic areas, playgrounds, public art and many acres of wild forest with miles of trails.

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36. Loyal B. Stearns Memorial

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The Loyal B. Stearns Memorial Fountain, also known as the Judge Loyal B. Stearns Memorial Fountain, is an outdoor 1941 drinking fountain and sculpture by the design firm A. E. Doyle and Associates, located in Portland, Oregon. It was erected in Washington Park in honor of the former Oregon judge Loyal B. Stearns.

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37. Grant Park

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Grant Park refers to both a neighborhood and public park in the Northeast section of Portland, Oregon. The neighborhood is bordered by Alameda and Beaumont-Wilshire to the north; Rose City Park to the east; Hollywood District, Laurelhurst, and Sullivan's Gulch to the south; and Irvington to the west.

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38. Brushstrokes

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Brushstrokes M.O. Stevens at en.wikipedia / Public domain

Brushstrokes is a 1996 sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein, installed outside the Portland Art Museum's Mark Building, in Portland, Oregon. It is part of the Brushstrokes series of artworks that includes several paintings and sculptures whose subject is the actions made with a house-painter's brush.

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39. Da Tung and Xi'an Bao Bao

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Da Tung and Xi'an Bao Bao Original work: Unknown artist
Depiction: Another Believer / CC-BY-SA-4.0

Da Tung and Xi'an Bao, is an outdoor 2002 bronze sculpture, located at the North Park Blocks in downtown Portland, Oregon, United States. The sculptor is unknown. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

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40. Ring of Time

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Ring of Time Original work: Hilda Grossman Morris
Depiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Ring of Time, also known as The Ring of Time, is an outdoor bronze sculpture by Hilda Grossman Morris, located at the entrance to the Standard Plaza in Portland, Oregon. The allegorical sculpture was created during 1965–1967 and is owned by the Standard Insurance Company.

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41. Oregon Zoo

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The Oregon Zoo, originally the Portland Zoo and later the Washington Park Zoo, is a zoo located in Washington Park, Portland, Oregon, approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) southwest of downtown Portland. Founded in 1888, it is the oldest zoo west of the Mississippi River.

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42. The Responsibility of Raising a Child

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The Responsibility of Raising a Child Original work: Rick Bartow
Depiction: Another Believer / Fair use

The Responsibility of Raising a Child, also known as From the Mad River to the Little Salmon River, or The Responsibility of Raising a Child, is an outdoor 2004 bronze sculpture by Native American artist Rick Bartow, located in Portland, Oregon, United States.

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43. Running Horses

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Running Horses Original work: Tom Hardy
Depiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Running Horses is an outdoor 1986 bronze sculpture by Tom Hardy, located on the Transit Mall in downtown Portland, Oregon. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

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44. Portland Museum of Art

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The Portland Museum of Art, or PMA, is the largest and oldest public art institution in the U. S. state of Maine. Founded as the Portland Society of Art in 1882. It is located in the downtown area known as The Arts District in Portland, Maine.

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45. Portlandia

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Portlandia Author of the sculpture: Raymond Kaskey ; Author of this photograph: Berkut ; / Cc-by-sa-3.0

Portlandia is a sculpture by Raymond Kaskey located above the entrance of the Portland Building in downtown Portland, Oregon. It is the second-largest copper repoussé statue in the United States, after the Statue of Liberty.

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46. Congregation Beth Israel

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Beth Israel is a Reform congregation and Jewish synagogue in Portland, Oregon, United States. The congregation was founded in 1858, while Oregon was still a territory, and built its first synagogue in 1859.

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Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.