56 Sights in Portland, United States (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Portland, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 56 sights are available in Portland, United States.

List of cities in United States Sightseeing Tours in Portland

1. Laurelhurst Park

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Laurelhurst Park Pete Forsyth / CC BY 4.0

Laurelhurst Park is a city park in the neighborhood of Laurelhurst in Portland, Oregon. The 26.81-acre (10.85 ha) park was acquired in 1909 from the estate of former Portland mayor William S. Ladd. The City of Portland purchased the land in 1911, and the following year park superintendent Emanuel Mische designed the park in accordance with the Olmsted Plan.

Wikipedia: Laurelhurst Park (EN)

2. Lone Fir Cemetery

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Lone Fir Cemetery in the southeast section of Portland, Oregon, United States is a cemetery owned and maintained by Metro, a regional government entity. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the first burial was in 1846 with the cemetery established in 1855. Lone Fir has over 25,000 burials spread over more than 30 acres (120,000 m2).

Wikipedia: Lone Fir Cemetery (EN)

3. I AM Sanctuary

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The "I AM" Activity Movement is the original ascended master teachings religious movement founded in the early 1930s by Guy Ballard (1878–1939) and his wife Edna Anne Wheeler Ballard (1886–1971) in Chicago, Illinois. It is an offshoot of theosophy and a major precursor of several New Age religions including the Church Universal and Triumphant. The movement had up to a million followers in 1938 and is still active today on a smaller scale. According to the official website of the parent organization, the Saint Germain Foundation, its worldwide headquarters is located in Schaumburg, Illinois, and there are approximately 300 local groups worldwide under several variations of the names "I AM" Sanctuary, "I AM" Temple, and other similar titles. As of 2007, the organization states that its purpose is "spiritual, educational and practical," and that no admission fee is charged for their activities. The term "I AM" is a reference to the ancient Sanskrit mantra So Ham and the divine biblical name "I Am that I Am".

Wikipedia: "I AM" Activity (EN)

4. Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park

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Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park is a 36.59-acre (148,100 m2) park located in downtown Portland, Oregon, along the Willamette River. After the 1974 removal of Harbor Drive, a major milestone in the freeway removal movement, the park was opened to the public in 1978. The park covers 13 tax lots and is owned by the City of Portland. The park was renamed in 1984 to honor Tom McCall, the Oregon governor who pledged his support for the beautification of the west bank of the Willamette River—harkening back to the City Beautiful plans at the turn of the century which envisioned parks and greenways along the river. The park is bordered by RiverPlace to the south, the Steel Bridge to the north, Naito Parkway to the west, and Willamette River to the east. In October 2012, Waterfront Park was voted one of America's ten greatest public spaces by the American Planning Association.

Wikipedia: Tom McCall Waterfront Park (EN)

5. Inversion +/-

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Inversion +/- Original work: Annie Han and Daniel MihalyoDepiction: Another Believer / CC-BY-SA-4.0

Inversion: Plus Minus is a pair of outdoor sculptures designed by artists and architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo, located in southeast Portland, Oregon. The sculptures, constructed from weathered steel angle iron, are sited near the Morrison Bridge and Hawthorne Bridge along Southeast Grand Avenue and represent "ghosts" of former buildings. The installation on Belmont Street emphasizes "negative space" while the sculpture on Hawthorne Street appears as a more solid matrix of metal. According to the artists, the works are reminiscent of industrial buildings that existed on the project sites historically. Inversion was funded by the two percent for art ordinance as part of the expansion of the Eastside Portland Streetcar line and is managed by the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

Wikipedia: Inversion: Plus Minus (EN)

6. Portland Center Stage at The Armory

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Portland Center Stage at The Armory Portland Center Stage / CC BY 2.0

The Armory, historically known as the First Regiment Armory Annex, and home to Portland Center Stage at The Armory, is a historic building with two theaters and is located in Portland, Oregon, United States. It was built in 1891 by Multnomah County to house the Oregon National Guard. In 2000, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Following a $36.1 million renovation project that lasted from 2002 to 2006, the building home to the theater company Portland Center Stage which produces 11 productions each season. An estimated 150,000 visitors visit The Armory annually to enjoy a mix of classical, contemporary and world premiere productions, along with the annual JAW: A Playwrights Festival, and a variety of high-quality education and community programs.

Wikipedia: First Regiment Armory Annex (EN)

7. Portland Union Station

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Portland Union Station is a train station in Portland, Oregon, United States, situated near the western shore of the Willamette River in Old Town Chinatown. It serves as an intermediate stop for Amtrak's Cascades and Coast Starlight routes and, along with King Street Station in Seattle, is one of two western termini of the Empire Builder. The station is a major transport hub for the Portland metropolitan area with connections to MAX Light Rail, the Portland Streetcar, and local and intercity bus services. The station building contains Wilf's Restaurant & Bar on the ground level and offices on the upper floors. It also has Amtrak's first Metropolitan Lounge on the West Coast, which is reserved for first-class sleeping car and business-class passengers.

Wikipedia: Portland Union Station (EN)

8. Portland City Hall

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Portland City Hall is the headquarters of city government of Portland, Oregon, United States. The four-story Italian Renaissance-style building houses the offices of the City Council, which consists of the mayor and four commissioners, and several other offices. City Hall is also home to the City Council chambers, located in the rotunda on the east side of the structure. Completed in 1895, the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on November 21, 1974. City Hall has gone through several renovations, with the most recent overhaul gutting the interior to upgrade it to modern seismic and safety standards. The original was built for $600,000, while the 1996 to 1998 renovation cost $29 million.

Wikipedia: Portland City Hall (Oregon) (EN)

9. Burnside Trolley Building

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The West Ankeny Car Barns Bay E is a former streetcar carbarn in Portland, Oregon, that is listed on the U. S. National Register of Historic Places. Completed in 1911, it was one of three buildings that collectively made up the Ankeny Car Barns complex of the Portland Railway, Light and Power Company (PRL&P), the owner and operator of Portland's streetcar system at the time. By 1978, the brick building had become the only surviving structure from the Ankeny complex and one of only two surviving remnants of carbarn complexes of the Portland area's large street railway and interurban system of the past, the other being the PRL&P's Sellwood Division Carbarn Office and Clubhouse.

Wikipedia: Bay E, West Ankeny Car Barns (EN)

10. The Pioneer Courthouse

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The Pioneer Courthouse is a federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon, United States. Built beginning in 1869, the structure is the oldest federal building in the Pacific Northwest, and the second-oldest west of the Mississippi River. Along with Pioneer Courthouse Square, it serves as the center of downtown Portland. It is also known as the Pioneer Post Office because a popular downtown Portland post office was, until 2005, located inside. The courthouse is one of four primary locations where the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit hears oral arguments. It also houses the chambers of the Portland-based judges on the Ninth Circuit.

Wikipedia: Pioneer Courthouse (EN)

11. East Portland Grand Avenue Historic District

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The East Portland Grand Avenue Historic District, located in southeast Portland, Oregon, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The district includes approximately 20 city blocks on or near Southeast Grand Avenue on the east side of the Willamette River, roughly bounded on the south by SE Main Street, north by SE Ankeny Street, west by SE Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, and east by SE Seventh Avenue. Most structures in the district are commercial buildings rising two to three stories. Immediately to the west of the historic district is Portland's east side industrial area, and to the east are industrial and residential areas.

Wikipedia: East Portland Grand Avenue Historic District (EN)

12. Awning

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Awning Original work: Douglas SenftDepiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Awning is an outdoor 1976 painted aluminum sculpture by Canadian artist Douglas Senft, located near Southwest 3rd Avenue and Southwest Market Street in downtown Portland, Oregon. The 60-foot (18 m) sculpture was selected and funded by the Portland Development Commission from more than 200 proposals in a request for art intended to "humanize the modern architecture" of the Portland Center. Senft was 26 years old when Awning was installed. It is part of the collection of the Regional Arts & Culture Council. The yellow-colored work is mounted to the side of 200 Market along a pedestrian trail that serves as an extension of Third Avenue.

Wikipedia: Awning (sculpture) (EN)

13. Portland Fire Museum

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The Portland Fire Museum is a fire museum in Portland, Maine. Located at 157 Spring Street in the former home of Fire Engine 4, the museum is operated by the Portland Veteran Firemen's Association (PVFA). It showcases the history of firefighting in Portland, including a number of retired firetrucks. The PVFA was originally located at the headquarters of Casco Engine 1 which was located at 19 South Street across from what is now the Cumberland County Civic Center. The building at 19 South Street was demolished during the building of the Spring Street arterial and the PVFA moved west to the 157 Spring Street location.

Wikipedia: Portland Fire Museum (EN)

14. Portland Observatory

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The Portland Observatory is a historic maritime signal tower at 138 Congress Street in the Munjoy Hill section of Portland, Maine. Built in 1807, it is the only known surviving tower of its type in the United States. Using both a telescope and signal flags, two-way communication between ship and shore was possible several hours before an incoming vessel reached the docks. The tower was designated a National Historic Landmark and a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 2006; it is now managed by Greater Portland Landmarks, a local historic preservation nonprofit. It is open to the public as a museum.

Wikipedia: Portland Observatory (EN)

15. Fountain for Company H

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Fountain for Company H, also known as Second Oregon Company Volunteers, is a 1914 fountain and war memorial designed by John H. Beaver, installed in Portland, Oregon's Plaza Blocks, in the United States. Dedicated to the men of Company H of the 2nd Oregon Volunteer Infantry Regiment killed in service during the Spanish–American War, the limestone and bronze memorial was installed in Lownsdale Square in 1914. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council. The memorial has been included in published walking tours of Portland.

Wikipedia: Fountain for Company H (EN)

16. Kvinneakt

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Kvinneakt Original work: Norman J. TaylorDepiction: brx0 / Fair use

Kvinneakt is an abstract bronze sculpture located on the Transit Mall of downtown Portland, Oregon. Designed and created by Norman J. Taylor between 1973 and 1975, the work was funded by TriMet and the United States Department of Transportation and was installed on the Transit Mall in 1977. The following year Kvinneakt appeared in the "Expose Yourself to Art" poster which featured future Mayor of Portland Bud Clark flashing the sculpture. It remained in place until November 2006 when it was removed temporarily during renovation of the Transit Mall and the installation of the MAX Light Rail on the mall.

Wikipedia: Kvinneakt (EN)

17. Neal Dow House

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The Neal Dow House, also known as Gen. Neal Dow House, is an historic house found at 714 Congress Street in Portland, Maine. It was built in 1829 for noted politician and prohibitionist Neal Dow (1804-1897), and was later designated a National Historic Landmark for that association. Dow was the author of the first prohibition law passed by the Maine legislature in 1851. He was known as a tireless, internationally known activist for the temperance movement. Dow's house was a center of activism in his lifetime, and is now the headquarters of the Maine chapter of the Women's Christian Temperance Union.

Wikipedia: Neal Dow House (EN)

18. Constellation: Flowers from a Neighborhood Garden

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Constellation: Flowers from a Neighborhood Garden Original work: Tad SavinarDepiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Constellation is a series of outdoor 2000 bronze sculptures by American artist Tad Savinar, installed at Holladay Park in northeast Portland, Oregon, United States. The work's three "distinct elements" include:Constellation or Constellation: Flowers from a Neighborhood Garden, a slender vase of daisies, hydrangeas and other flowers; Constellation (Molecule) or Constellation: Isolated Molecule for a Good Neighborhood, an abstract molecule representing a "good neighborhood"; and Constellation: Neighborhood Gardiner or simply Constellation, a female figure carrying gardening shears.

Wikipedia: Constellation (sculpture) (EN)

19. Mill Ends Park

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Mill Ends Park atul666 from Portland, USA / CC BY-SA 2.0

Mill Ends Park is a tiny urban park, consisting of one tree, located in the median strip of SW Naito Parkway next to Tom McCall Waterfront Park along the Willamette River near SW Taylor Street in downtown Portland, Oregon, United States. The park is a small circle 2 ft (0.61 m) across, with a total area of 452 sq in (0.292 m2). It is the smallest park in the world, according to the Guinness Book of Records, which first granted it this recognition in 1971, though this title may be soon given to a 2022 park in Talent, Oregon, which is 78 sq in (500 cm2) smaller.

Wikipedia: Mill Ends Park (EN)

20. Lovejoy Columns

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The Lovejoy Columns, located in Portland, Oregon, United States, supported the Lovejoy Ramp, a viaduct that from 1927 to 1999 carried the western approach to the Broadway Bridge over the freight tracks in what is now the Pearl District. The columns were painted by Greek immigrant Tom Stefopoulos between 1948 and 1952. In 1999, the viaduct was demolished but the columns were spared due to the efforts of the architectural group Rigga. For the next five years, attempts to restore the columns were unsuccessful and they remained in storage beneath the Fremont Bridge.

Wikipedia: Lovejoy Columns (EN)

21. Oregon Rail Heritage Center

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The Oregon Rail Heritage Center (ORHC) is a railway museum in Portland, Oregon. Along with other rolling stock, the museum houses three steam locomotives owned by the City of Portland: Southern Pacific 4449, Spokane, Portland & Seattle 700, and Oregon Railroad & Navigation Co. 197, the first two of which are restored and operable. The center opened to the public on September 22, 2012. The project to establish the center was led by the Oregon Rail Heritage Foundation (ORHF), a non-profit organization established in 2002. The museum site is in Southeast Portland.

Wikipedia: Oregon Rail Heritage Center (EN)

22. Keller Auditorium

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Keller Auditorium, formerly known as the Portland Municipal Auditorium, the Portland Public Auditorium, and the Portland Civic Auditorium, is a performing arts center located on Clay Street in downtown Portland, Oregon, United States. It is part of the Portland's Centers for the Arts. Opened in 1917, the venue first changed names in 1966, being renamed again in 2000 in honor of a $1.5 million renovation donation by Richard B. Keller. An extensive remodeling and modernization in 1967–68 effectively changed its original exterior appearance beyond recognition.

Wikipedia: Keller Auditorium (EN)

23. Holt Hall

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The Maine Eye and Ear Infirmary is a historic medical facility that was located at 794-800 Congress Street in Portland, Maine. Also known as Holt Hall, the structure, designed by John Calvin Stevens, was redeveloped into a residential building in 1997, after standing dormant for nearly 10 years. The Maine Eye and Ear Infirmary was built in 1891. In 1951 the hospital merged with the Children's Hospital and Maine General Hospital to become Maine Medical Center. The facility was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

Wikipedia: Maine Eye and Ear Infirmary (EN)

24. Ladd's Addition Historic District

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Ladd's Addition is an inner southeast historic district of Portland, Oregon, United States. It is Portland's oldest planned residential development, and one of the oldest in the western United States. The district is known in Portland for a diagonal street pattern, which is at odds with the rectilinear grid of the surrounding area. Roughly eight blocks (east-west) by ten blocks (north-south) in size, Ladd's is bordered by SE Hawthorne, Division, 12th, and 20th streets. It is part of the Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood association.

Wikipedia: Ladd's Addition (EN)

25. Victoria Mansion

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Victoria Mansion, also known as the Morse-Libby House or Morse-Libby Mansion, is a landmark example of American residential architecture located in downtown Portland, Maine, United States. The brownstone exterior, elaborate interior design, opulent furnishings and early technological conveniences provide a detailed portrait of lavish living in nineteenth-century America. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1971 for its architectural significance as a particularly well-preserved Italianate mansion.

Wikipedia: Victoria Mansion (EN)

26. Hawthorne Bridge

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The Hawthorne Bridge is a truss bridge with a vertical lift that spans the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon, joining Hawthorne Boulevard and Madison Street. It is the oldest vertical-lift bridge in operation in the United States and the oldest highway bridge in Portland. It is also the busiest bicycle and transit bridge in Oregon, with over 8,000 cyclists and 800 TriMet buses daily. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in November 2012.

Wikipedia: Hawthorne Bridge (EN)

27. Keller Fountain Park

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Keller Fountain Park is a city park in downtown Portland, Oregon. Originally named Forecourt Fountain or Auditorium Forecourt, the 0.92-acre (0.37 ha) park opened in 1970 across Third Avenue from what was then Civic Auditorium. In 1978, the park was renamed after Ira C. Keller, head of the Portland Development Commission (PDC) from 1958–1972. Civic Auditorium was renamed as Keller Auditorium in 2000, but is named in honor of Ira's son, Richard B. Keller.

Wikipedia: Keller Fountain Park (EN)

28. Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception

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The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception is a historic cathedral at 307 Congress Street in Portland, Maine that serves as seat of the Diocese of Portland. The pastor is Bishop Robert Deeley, and the rector is Father Seamus Griesbach. The church, an imposing Gothic Revival structure built in 1866–69, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. It is the tallest building in Portland and the third tallest in Maine.

Wikipedia: Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception (Portland, Maine) (EN)

29. Driver's Seat

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Driver's Seat Original work: Don MerktDepiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Driver's Seat is a 1994 galvanized steel sculpture by Don Merkt, installed along the Transit Mall in Portland, Oregon's Old Town Chinatown neighborhood, in the United States. The artwork was funded by the City of Portland's Percent for Art program, the Portland Development Commission, and TriMet, and remains part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

Wikipedia: Driver's Seat (sculpture) (EN)

30. Facing the Crowd

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Facing the Crowd Michael Stutz (artwork only) / CC-BY-SA-3.0

Facing the Crowd is a series of two outdoor sculptures by American artist Michael Stutz, located outside of Providence Park in Portland, Oregon, in the United States. Composed of silicon bronze, the sculptures depict faces of a laughing man and a smiling boy. They were funded by the City of Portland's Percent for Art program and were installed in 2001, during a major remodel of the outdoor sports venue then known as PGE Park.

Wikipedia: Facing the Crowd (EN)

31. Veterans Memorial Coliseum

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The Veterans Memorial Coliseum is an indoor arena located in the oldest part of the Rose Quarter area in Portland, Oregon. The arena is the home of the Portland Winterhawks, a major junior ice hockey team, and was the original home of the Portland Trail Blazers of the National Basketball Association. It has been included on the National Register of Historic Places in recognition of its architectural significance.

Wikipedia: Veterans Memorial Coliseum (Portland, Oregon) (EN)

32. Grace

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The former Chestnut Street Methodist Church is an historic church building at 15 Chestnut Street in Portland, Maine. Built in 1856, it is rare in the city as an early example of Gothic Revival architecture, and is one of the few surviving works of Charles A. Alexander, a popular architect of the period. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. It now houses a restaurant.

Wikipedia: Chestnut Street Methodist Church (Portland, Maine) (EN)

33. First Parish Portland Unitarian Universalist Church

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First Parish Church is an historic church at 425 Congress Street in Portland, Maine. Built in 1825 for a congregation established in 1674, it is the oldest church building in the city, and one of its finest examples of Federal period architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The congregation is Unitarian Universalist; its pastor is Reverend Christina Sillari.

Wikipedia: First Parish Church (Portland, Maine) (EN)

34. Peacock Lane Historic District

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Peacock Lane is a four-block street in southeast Portland, Oregon, in the United States. It is known for its elaborately decorated homes during the Christmas and holiday season. During this time of year, thousands of people come to view the displays, buy cocoa, take horsedrawn carriage rides, and sing. The street earned a listing on the National Register of Historic Places in 2017.

Wikipedia: Peacock Lane (EN)

35. Nepenthes

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Nepenthes Original work: Dan CorsonDepiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Nepenthes is a series of four sculptures by artist Dan Corson, installed in 2013 along Northwest Davis Street in the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, in the United States. The work was inspired by the genus of carnivorous plants of the same name, known as tropical pitcher plants. The sculptures are 17 feet (5.2 m) tall and glow in the dark due to photovoltaics.

Wikipedia: Nepenthes (sculpture) (EN)

36. Lan Su Chinese Garden

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Lan Su Chinese Garden, formerly the Portland Classical Chinese Garden and titled the Garden of Awakening Orchids, is a walled Chinese garden enclosing a full city block, roughly 40,000 square feet (4,000 m2) in the Chinatown area of the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, United States. The garden is influenced by many of the famous classical gardens in Suzhou.

Wikipedia: Lan Su Chinese Garden (EN)

37. Hōlon

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Hōlon Original work: Donald WilsonDepiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Holon, also known as Hōlon, is an outdoor stone sculpture by Donald Wilson, located in the South Park Blocks in Portland, Oregon, United States. It was originally commissioned in 1978–1979 and re-carved in 2003–2004. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

Wikipedia: Holon (sculpture) (EN)

38. Echo Gate

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Echo Gate Original work: Ean Eldred and the architectural firm RiggaDepiction: User:Another Believer / Fair use

Echo Gate is an outdoor 2001 sculpture by Ean Eldred and the architectural firm Rigga, located along the Eastbank Esplanade in Portland, Oregon, United States. It was funded by the City of Portland Development Commission's Percent for Art program, and is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

Wikipedia: Echo Gate (EN)

39. Portland Japanese Garden

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Portland Japanese Garden OpenStreetMap contributors / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Portland Japanese Garden is a traditional Japanese garden occupying 12 acres, located within Washington Park in the West Hills of Portland, Oregon, United States. It is operated as a private non-profit organization, which leased the site from the city in the early 1960s. Stephen D. Bloom has been the chief executive officer of the Portland Japanese Garden since 2005.

Wikipedia: Portland Japanese Garden (EN)

40. Alphabet Historic District

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The Alphabet Historic District, is a historic district in the Northwest District of Portland, Oregon which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2000. It is 156.9 acres (63.5 ha) in area and includes 478 contributing buildings. It is roughly bounded by NW Lovejoy St., NW Marshall St., NW 17th Ave., W. Burnside St., and NW 24th Ave.

Wikipedia: Alphabet Historic District (EN)

41. Broadway Bridge

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Broadway Bridge Original uploader was Cacophony at en.wikipedia / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The Broadway Bridge is a Rall-type bascule bridge spanning the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon, United States, built in 1913. It was Portland's first bascule bridge, and it continues to hold the distinction of being the longest span of its bascule design type in the world. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in November 2012.

Wikipedia: Broadway Bridge (Portland, Oregon) (EN)

42. The Dreamer

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The Dreamer Original work: Manuel IzquierdoDepiction: Another Believer / Fair use

The Dreamer, or simply Dreamer, is an outdoor 1979 muntz bronze sculpture and fountain of a reclining woman by Manuel Izquierdo, installed at Pettygrove Park in Portland, Oregon, United States. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

Wikipedia: The Dreamer (sculpture) (EN)

43. Ghost Ship

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Ghost Ship Original work: James Harrison and RiggaDepiction: User:Another Believer / Fair use

Ghost Ship is an outdoor 2001 sculpture by James Harrison and Rigga, a group of local artists, located along the Eastbank Esplanade in Portland, Oregon. It is made of copper, stainless steel, art glass, and two lamps. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

Wikipedia: Ghost Ship (sculpture) (EN)

44. Urban Hydrology

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Urban Hydrology Original work: Fernanda D'AgostinoDepiction: Another Believer / CC-BY-SA-4.0

Urban Hydrology is a series of twelve outdoor 2009 granite sculpture by Fernanda D'Agostino, installed along the Portland Transit Mall in Portland, Oregon, United States. The work is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

Wikipedia: Urban Hydrology (EN)

45. Genoa Building

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The Genoa Building, at the intersection of Southeast Belmont Street and Southeast 29th Avenue in Portland in the U. S. state of Oregon, is a single-story commercial building listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in a Vernacular style with Mediterranean features in 1930, it was added to the register in 1997.

Wikipedia: Genoa Building (EN)

46. Vista Bridge

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The Vista Bridge is an arch bridge for vehicles and pedestrians located in Portland, Oregon, United States. It connects the areas of King's Hill and Vista Ridge which are both in the Goose Hollow neighborhood. The MAX Light Rail line and Jefferson Street/Canyon Road travel under the bridge, and Vista Avenue crosses the bridge.

Wikipedia: Vista Bridge (EN)

47. Etz Chaim Synagogue

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Etz Chaim Synagogue is a synagogue in Portland, Maine. Located at 267 Congress Street, it is the only immigrant-era European-style synagogue remaining in Maine. It was founded in 1921 as an English-language synagogue, rather than a traditional Yiddish-language one. Gary S. Berenson presides as Rabbi of the congregation.

Wikipedia: Etz Chaim Synagogue (EN)

48. Loyal B. Stearns Memorial

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The Loyal B. Stearns Memorial Fountain, also known as the Judge Loyal B. Stearns Memorial Fountain, is an outdoor 1941 drinking fountain and sculpture by the design firm A. E. Doyle and Associates, located in Portland, Oregon. It was erected in Washington Park in honor of the former Oregon judge Loyal B. Stearns.

Wikipedia: Loyal B. Stearns Memorial Fountain (EN)

49. The Portland Building

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The Portland Building, alternatively referenced as the Portland Municipal Services Building, is a 15-story municipal office building located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland, Oregon. Built at a cost of US$29 million, it opened in 1982 and was considered architecturally groundbreaking at the time.

Wikipedia: Portland Building (EN)

50. Universal Peace & Baby Elephant

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Universal Peace & Baby Elephant Original work: Unknown artistDepiction: Another Believer / CC-BY-SA-4.0

Da Tung and Xi'an Bao, is an outdoor 2002 bronze sculpture, located at the North Park Blocks in downtown Portland, Oregon, United States. The sculptor is unknown. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council.

Wikipedia: Da Tung and Xi'an Bao Bao (EN)

51. Floribunda

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Floribunda Original work: Mark CalderonDepiction: Another Believer / Fair use

Floribunda is an outdoor 1998 bronze sculpture by American artist Mark Calderon, installed in Portland, Oregon, United States. It is part of the City of Portland and Multnomah County Public Art Collection courtesy of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, which administers the work.

Wikipedia: Floribunda (sculpture) (EN)

52. USS Blueback

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USS Blueback (SS-581) is a Barbel-class submarine that served in the United States Navy from 1959 to 1990, and subsequently was made into an exhibit at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. She was the second Navy submarine to bear the name.

Wikipedia: USS Blueback (SS-581) (EN)

53. Portland Museum of Art

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The Portland Museum of Art, or PMA, is the largest and oldest public art institution in the U. S. state of Maine. Founded as the Portland Society of Art in 1882. It is located in the downtown area known as The Arts District in Portland, Maine.

Wikipedia: Portland Museum of Art (EN)

54. Portland New Chinatown-Japantown Historic District

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The Portland New Chinatown/Japantown Historic District is an historic district in Portland, Oregon's Old Town Chinatown neighborhood, in the United States. The district is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Wikipedia: Portland New Chinatown–Japantown Historic District (EN)

55. Congregation Beth Israel

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Beth Israel is a Reform congregation and Jewish synagogue in Portland, Oregon, United States. The congregation was founded in 1858, while Oregon was still a territory, and built its first synagogue in 1859.

Wikipedia: Congregation Beth Israel (Portland, Oregon) (EN)

56. South Portland Historic District

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South Portland Historic District Base map: OpenStreetMap contributorsDistrict boundaries/shading: Ian Poellet / CC BY-SA 2.0

The South Portland Historic District is an historic district in Portland, Oregon's South Portland neighborhood, in the United States. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.

Wikipedia: South Portland Historic District (EN)

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.

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