100 Sights in New York, United States (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in New York, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 100 sights are available in New York, United States.

List of cities in United States Sightseeing Tours in New York

1. Fearless Girl

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Fearless Girl Original work: Kristen VisbalDepiction: Rachel Knipel / CC-BY-SA-4.0

Fearless Girl is a bronze sculpture by Kristen Visbal, on Broad Street across from the New York Stock Exchange Building in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. The statue was installed on March 7, 2017, in anticipation of International Women's Day the following day. It depicts a 4-foot high (1.2 m) girl promoting female empowerment.

Wikipedia: Fearless Girl (EN)

2. Gay Street

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Gay Street is a short, angled street that marks off one block of Greenwich Village in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Although coincidentally encompassed by the Stonewall National Monument, the street's name does not refer to the LGBT character of Greenwich Village, or to any other LGBT issues. Rather, the name may come from a family named Gay who owned land or lived there in colonial times: a newspaper of May 11, 1775 contains a classified ad where an "R. Gay", living in the Bowery, offers a gelding for sale. This street, originally a stable alley, was probably named for an early landowner, not for the sexuality of any denizens, who coincidentally reside in Greenwich Village, a predominantly homosexual community. Nor is it likely, as is sometimes claimed, that its namesake was Sidney Howard Gay, editor of the National Anti-Slavery Standard; he would have been 19 when the street was christened in 1833. The mistaken association with an abolitionist is probably because the street's residents were mainly black, many of them servants of the wealthy white families on Washington Square. Later it became noted as an address for black musicians, giving the street a bohemian reputation.

Wikipedia: Gay Street (Manhattan) (EN)

3. Church of Saint Ignatius Loyola

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The Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola is a Catholic parish church located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City, administered by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). The parish is under the authority of the Archdiocese of New York, and was established in 1851 as St. Lawrence O'Toole's Church. In 1898, permission to change the patron saint of the parish from St. Lawrence O'Toole to St. Ignatius of Loyola was granted by Rome. The address is 980 Park Avenue, New York City, New York 10028. The church on the southwest corner of Park Avenue and 84th Street is part of a Jesuit complex on the block that includes Wallace Hall, the parish hall beneath the church, the rectory at the midblock location on Park Avenue, the grade school of St. Ignatius's School on the north midblock location of 84th Street behind the church and the high school of Loyola School at the northwest corner of Park Avenue and 83rd Street. In addition, another Jesuit high school, Regis High School, occupies the midblock location on the north side of 84th Street. The church was added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 24, 1980.

Wikipedia: Church of St. Ignatius Loyola (New York City) (EN)

4. Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art

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The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art (LLM), formerly the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, is a visual art museum in SoHo, Lower Manhattan, New York City. It mainly collects, preserves and exhibits visual arts created by LGBTQ artists or art about LGBTQ+ themes, issues, and people. The museum, operated by the Leslie-Lohman Gay Art Foundation, offers exhibitions year-round in numerous locations and owns more than 22,000 objects, including, paintings, drawings, photography, prints and sculpture. It has been recognized as one of the oldest arts groups engaged in the collection and preservation of gay art. The foundation was awarded Museum status by the New York State Board of Regents in 2011 and was formally accredited as a museum in 2016. The museum is a member of the American Alliance of Museums and operates pursuant to their guidelines. As of 2019, the LLM was the only museum in the world dedicated to artwork documenting the LGBTQ experience.

Wikipedia: Leslie-Lohman Museum of Art (EN)

5. Empire State Building

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The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The building was designed by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon and built from 1930 to 1931. Its name is derived from "Empire State", the nickname of the state of New York. The building has a roof height of 1,250 feet (380 m) and stands a total of 1,454 feet (443.2 m) tall, including its antenna. The Empire State Building was the world's tallest building until the World Trade Center was constructed in 1970; following the collapse of the World Trade Center in 2001, the Empire State Building was New York City's tallest building until it was surpassed in 2012. As of 2022, the building is the seventh-tallest building in New York City, the ninth-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States, the 54th-tallest in the world, and the sixth-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

Wikipedia: Empire State Building (EN)

6. Center for Brooklyn History

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Center for Brooklyn History Reading Tom / CC BY 2.0

The Center for Brooklyn History is a museum, library, and educational center founded in 1863 that preserves and encourages the study of Brooklyn's 400-year history. The center's Romanesque Revival building, located at Pierrepont and Clinton Streets in Brooklyn Heights, was designed by George B. Post and built in 1878-81, is a National Historic Landmark and part of New York City's Brooklyn Heights Historic District. The CBH houses materials relating to the history of Brooklyn and its people, and hosts exhibitions which draw over 9,000 members a year. In addition to general programming, the CBH serves over 70,000 public school students and teachers annually by providing exhibit tours, educational programs and curricula, and making its professional staff available for instruction and consultation.

Wikipedia: Brooklyn Historical Society (EN)

7. Hostelling International New York City

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The Association Residence Nursing Home, also called the Association for the Relief of Respectable, Aged and Indigent Females, is an historic building in New York City built from 1881–1883 to the design of Richard Morris Hunt in the Victorian Gothic style. It is located on Amsterdam Avenue between 103rd and 104th Streets on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, and is now a hostel run by Hostelling International. The Association was founded in 1814 to help the widows of soldiers of the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. An addition to the building was constructed on the south end of the property in 1907, which contained seven Tiffany windows which are now in the collection of the Morse Museum of American Art. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.

Wikipedia: Association Residence Nursing Home (EN)

8. Brooklyn Bridge Park

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Brooklyn Bridge Park Caroline Culler (User:Wgreaves) / CC BY-SA 4.0

Brooklyn Bridge Park is an 85-acre (34 ha) park on the Brooklyn side of the East River in New York City. Designed by landscape architecture firm Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, the park is located on a 1.3-mile (2.1 km) plot of land from Atlantic Avenue in the south, under the Brooklyn Heights Promenade and past the Brooklyn Bridge, to Jay Street north of the Manhattan Bridge. From north to south, the park includes the preexisting Empire–Fulton Ferry and Main Street Parks; the historic Fulton Ferry Landing; and Piers 1–6, which contain various playgrounds and residential developments. The park also includes Empire Stores and the Tobacco Warehouse, two 19th-century structures, and is a part of the Brooklyn Waterfront Greenway, a series of parks and bike paths around Brooklyn.

Wikipedia: Brooklyn Bridge Park (EN)

9. Colonnade row

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Colonnade Row, also known as LaGrange Terrace, on present-day Lafayette Street in New York City's NoHo neighborhood, is a landmarked series of Greek revival buildings originally built in the early 1830s. They are believed to have been built by Seth Geer, although the project has been attributed to a number of other architects. The buildings' original name comes from the Marquis de Lafayette's estate in France, but the series of nine row houses, of which four remain, owe their existence to John Jacob Astor, who bought the property and whose grandson John Jacob Astor III later lived at No. 424. The buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places under the name LaGrange Terrace and the facades remain standing on Lafayette Street south of Astor Place.

Wikipedia: Colonnade Row (EN)

10. Coney Island Yard Electric Motor Repair Shop

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The New York City Transit Authority operates a total of 24 rail yards for the New York City Subway system, and one for the Staten Island Railway. There are 10 active A Division yards and 11 active B Division yards, two of which are shared between divisions for storage and car washing. In addition, there is one yard for the Staten Island Railway and three non-revenue Division-independent yards. Many of the system's yards are used for off-peak storage, whereas some have inspection facilities where basic routine maintenance is carried out. Of these yards, rolling stock are assigned to seven A Division yards and seven B Division yards. Within the yards are 14 maintenance facilities, whereas two yards perform major overhaul and car rebuilding work.

Wikipedia: Coney Island Yard Electric Motor Repair Shop (EN)

11. Columbus Park

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Columbus Park formerly known as Mulberry Bend Park, Five Points Park and Paradise Park, is a public park in Chinatown, Manhattan, in New York City that was built in 1897. During the 19th century, this was the most dangerous ghetto area of immigrant New York, as portrayed in the book and film Gangs of New York. Back then, the park's site was part of the Five Points neighborhood, in the area known as Mulberry Bend, hence its alternative names. It was renamed Columbus Park in 1911, in honor of Christopher Columbus. Today, the park often serves as a gathering place for the local Chinese community, where "the neighborhood meets up here to play mahjong, perform traditional Chinese music... [and] practice tai chi in the early mornings."

Wikipedia: Columbus Park (Manhattan) (EN)

12. Comedy Cellar

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Comedy Cellar Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Comedy Cellar is a comedy club in Manhattan where many top New York comedians perform. It is widely considered to be the best comedy club in the United States. It was founded in 1982 by then stand-up comedian, and current television writer/producer Bill Grundfest. It is located in Greenwich Village on 117 Macdougal Street between West 3rd Street and Minetta Lane. Above the club is a restaurant called The Olive Tree Cafe to which it is connected, where many of the comedians hang out after performing. The club is owned by Noam Dworman, who inherited it from his late father, Manny, and run by booker Estee Adoram, who has developed the club's talent for nearly four decades. The businesses share the same menu, kitchen, and staff.

Wikipedia: Comedy Cellar (EN)

13. King Manor Museum

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King Manor, also known as the Rufus King House, is a historic house at 150th Street and Jamaica Avenue in Jamaica, Queens, New York City. It was the home of Founding Father Rufus King, a signatory of the United States Constitution, New York state senator, and ambassador to Great Britain immediately after the American Revolution. Descendants of King's family lived in the house until 1896 when Rufus' granddaughter Cornelia King died and the house was sold to the Village of Jamaica. When Jamaica, along with the western half of Queens became part of the City of Greater New York, the house and the property were turned over to the New York City Parks Department which re-designated the land as "Rufus King Park."

Wikipedia: King Manor (EN)

14. Carrie Bradshaw's house

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Carrie Bradshaw's house / Fair use

Caroline Marie "Carrie" Bradshaw is a fictional character from the HBO franchise Sex and the City, portrayed by Sarah Jessica Parker. Candace Bushnell created Carrie as a semi-autobiographical character for her column "Sex and the City" in The New York Observer, which was later compiled into the book Sex and the City and adapted into the television series. Parker reprised the role in the films Sex and the City and Sex and the City 2, and the HBO Max series And Just Like That... Bushnell also authored the young adult novels The Carrie Diaries and Summer and the City featuring the character. The Carrie Diaries was adapted into a CW prequel series of the same name, with Carrie portrayed by AnnaSophia Robb.

Wikipedia: Carrie Bradshaw (EN)

15. Cleopatra's Needle

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Cleopatra's Needles are a separated pair of ancient Egyptian obelisks now in London and New York City. The obelisks were originally made in Heliopolis during the New Kingdom period, inscribed by the 18th dynasty pharaoh Thutmose III and 19th dynasty pharaoh Ramesses II. They were later moved to the Caesareum of Alexandria, which had been conceived by Ptolemaic Queen Cleopatra VII, for whom the obelisks are named. They stood in Alexandria for almost two millennia until they were re-erected in London and New York City in 1877 and 1881 respectively. Together with Pompey's Pillar, they were described in the 1840s in David Roberts' Egypt and Nubia as "[the] most striking monuments of ancient Alexandria".

Wikipedia: Cleopatra's Needle (EN)

16. Cooper–Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum is a design museum housed within the Andrew Carnegie Mansion in Manhattan, New York City, along the Upper East Side's Museum Mile. It is one of 19 museums that fall under the wing of the Smithsonian Institution and is one of three Smithsonian facilities located in New York City, the other two being the National Museum of the American Indian's George Gustav Heye Center in Bowling Green and the Archives of American Art New York Research Center in the Flatiron District. It is the only museum in the United States devoted to historical and contemporary design. Its collections and exhibitions explore approximately 240 years of design aesthetic and creativity.

Wikipedia: Cooper–Hewitt, National Design Museum (EN)

17. John V. Lindsay East River Park

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East River Park, also called John V. Lindsay East River Park, is 57.5-acre (20 ha) public park located on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, part of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Bisected by the Williamsburg Bridge, it stretches along the East River from Montgomery Street up to 12th Street on the east side of the FDR Drive. Its now-demolished amphitheater, built in 1941 just south of Grand Street, had been reconstructed and was often used for public performances. The park includes football, baseball, and soccer fields; tennis, basketball, and handball courts; a running track; and bike paths, including the East River Greenway. Fishing is another popular activity.

Wikipedia: East River Park (EN)

18. Morningside Park

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Morningside Park is a 30-acre (12-hectare) public park in Upper Manhattan, New York City. The park is bounded by 110th Street to the south, 123rd Street to the north, Morningside Avenue to the east, and Morningside Drive to the west. A cliff made of Manhattan schist runs through the park and separates Morningside Heights, above the cliff to the west, from Harlem. The park includes other rock outcroppings; a man-made ornamental pond and waterfall; three sculptures; several athletic fields; playgrounds; and an arboretum. Morningside Park is operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, although the group Friends of Morningside Park helps maintain it.

Wikipedia: Morningside Park (Manhattan) (EN)

19. Flatiron Building

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The Flatiron Building, originally the Fuller Building, is a triangular 22-story, 285-foot-tall (86.9 m) steel-framed landmarked building at 175 Fifth Avenue in the eponymous Flatiron District neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Designed by Daniel Burnham and Frederick P. Dinkelberg, it was completed in 1902 and originally contained 20 floors. The building sits on a triangular block formed by Fifth Avenue, Broadway, and East 22nd Street—where the building's 87-foot (27 m) back end is located—with East 23rd Street grazing the triangle's northern (uptown) peak. The name "Flatiron" derives from its resemblance to a cast-iron clothes iron.

Wikipedia: Flatiron Building (EN)

20. New York Aquarium

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The New York Aquarium is the oldest continually operating aquarium in the United States, located on the Riegelmann Boardwalk in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York City. It was founded at Castle Garden in Battery Park, Manhattan in 1896, and moved to Coney Island in 1957. The aquarium is operated by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) as part of its integrated system of four zoos and one aquarium, most notably the Bronx Zoo. It is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). As part of WCS, the aquarium's mission is to save wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature.

Wikipedia: New York Aquarium (EN)

21. J. Marion Sims

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James Marion Sims was an American physician in the field of surgery, known as the "father of gynecology". His most famous work was the development of a surgical technique for the repair of vesicovaginal fistula, a severe complication of obstructed childbirth. He is also remembered for inventing Sims speculum, Sims sigmoid catheter, and the Sims position. Against significant opposition, he established, in New York, the first hospital specifically for women. He was forced out of the hospital he founded because he insisted on treating cancer patients; he played a small role in the creation of the nation's first cancer hospital, which opened after his death.

Wikipedia: J. Marion Sims (EN)

22. Chelsea Park

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Chelsea Park Eden, Janine and Jim from New York City / CC BY 2.0

Chelsea Park is a park in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, that dates back to 1910. The park has sports fields, basketball and handball courts, a children's playground and space for sitting. The surface is mostly tarmac or artificial turf, with pits for the plane trees and some plots with annual flower plantings. There is a statue to a World War I soldier, the "Doughboy Statue", erected in 1921. The process of approval, funding and clearing the tenements that occupied the site was protracted. The park has since been upgraded several times by the Works Progress Administration and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.

Wikipedia: Chelsea Park (EN)

23. Parachute Jump

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The Parachute Jump is a defunct amusement ride and a landmark in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, along the Riegelmann Boardwalk at Coney Island. Situated in Steeplechase Plaza near the B&B Carousell, the structure consists of a 250-foot-tall (76 m), 170-short-ton (150 t) open-frame, steel parachute tower. Twelve cantilever steel arms radiate from the top of the tower; when the ride was in operation, each arm supported a parachute attached to a lift rope and a set of guide cables. Riders were belted into a two-person canvas seat, lifted to the top, and dropped. The parachute and shock absorbers at the bottom would slow their descent.

Wikipedia: Parachute Jump (EN)

24. Candler Building

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The Candler Building is a skyscraper at the southern end of Times Square in the Midtown Manhattan neighborhood of New York City. Located at 220 West 42nd Street, with an alternative address of 221 West 41st Street, the building contains 24 stories. The building was designed by the firm of Willauer, Shape and Bready in the Spanish Renaissance style. It was constructed between 1912 and 1913 for Coca-Cola Company owner Asa Griggs Candler. The Candler Building was one of the last skyscrapers built in New York City before the 1916 Zoning Resolution, which required setbacks. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP).

Wikipedia: Candler Building (New York City) (EN)

25. First Presbyterian Church

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The First Presbyterian Church, known as "Old First", is a church located at 48 Fifth Avenue between West 11th and 12th Streets in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was built in 1844–1846, and designed by Joseph C. Wells in the Gothic Revival style. The south transept of the building was added in 1893–1894, and was designed by the firm of McKim, Mead & White. The church complex, which includes a parish house – now referred to as the "South Wing" – on West 11th Street and a church house on West 12th Street designed by Edgar Tafel, is located within the Greenwich Village Historic District.

Wikipedia: First Presbyterian Church (Manhattan) (EN)

26. Bryant Park

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Bryant Park is a 9.6-acre (39,000 m2) public park located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Privately managed, it is located between Fifth Avenue and Avenue of the Americas and between 40th and 42nd Streets in Midtown Manhattan. The eastern half of Bryant Park is occupied by the Main Branch of the New York Public Library. The western half, which contains a lawn, shaded walkways, and amenities such as a carousel, is located entirely over an underground structure that houses the library's stacks. The park hosts several events, including a seasonal "Winter Village" with an ice rink and shops during the winter.

Wikipedia: Bryant Park (EN)

27. Eternal Light Flagstaff

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The Eternal Light Flagstaff is a memorial monument located in Madison Square Park in Manhattan, New York City which was dedicated on Armistice Day, November 11, 1923, and commemorates the return to the United States of members of the United States armed forces who fought in World War I, who were officially received by the city on that site in 1918. It was designed by architect Thomas Hastings of Carrère and Hastings, and consists of a flagstaff and a sculpture by Paul Wayland Bartlett. The memorial was commissioned by department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker and cost $25,000 to construct. It was completed in 1924.

Wikipedia: Eternal Light Flagstaff (EN)

28. Unisphere

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The Unisphere is a spherical stainless steel representation of the Earth in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in the New York City borough of Queens. The globe was designed by Gilmore D. Clarke as part of his plan for the 1964 New York World's Fair. Commissioned to celebrate the beginning of the space age, the Unisphere was conceived and constructed as the theme symbol of the World's Fair. The theme of the World's Fair was "Peace Through Understanding", and the Unisphere represented the theme of global interdependence, being dedicated to "Man's Achievements on a Shrinking Globe in an Expanding Universe".

Wikipedia: Unisphere (EN)

29. Fort Greene Park

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Fort Greene Park is a city-owned and -operated park in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, New York City. The 30.2-acre (12.2 ha) park was originally named after the fort formerly located there, Fort Putnam, which itself was named for Rufus Putnam, George Washington's Chief of Engineers in the Revolutionary War. Renamed in 1812 for Nathanael Greene, a hero of the American Revolutionary War, it was redesigned by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, who also designed Central Park and Prospect Park, in 1867. The park contains the Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument, which includes a crypt designed by Olmsted and Vaux.

Wikipedia: Fort Greene Park (EN)

30. Prospect Park Zoo

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The Prospect Park Zoo is a 12-acre (4.9 ha) zoo located off Flatbush Avenue on the eastern side of Prospect Park, Brooklyn, New York City. As of 2016, the zoo houses 864 animals representing about 176 species, and as of 2007, it averages 300,000 visitors annually. The Prospect Park Zoo is operated by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). In conjunction with the Prospect Park Zoo's operations, the WCS offers children's educational programs, is engaged in restoration of endangered species populations, runs a wildlife theater, and reaches out to the local community through volunteer programs.

Wikipedia: Prospect Park Zoo (EN)

31. James Stranahan

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J. S. T. Stranahan is a bronze statue in Brooklyn's Prospect Park in New York City. Designed by Frederick William MacMonnies and erected in 1891 near the park's entrance at Grand Army Plaza, it honors James S. T. Stranahan, a businessman from Brooklyn who served on the city's park commission and was instrumental in Prospect Park's creation. The statue is considered one of MacMonnies' finest works and was praised for its realism. An inscription on the pedestal of the statue includes the Latin phrase LECTOR SI MONUMENTUM REQUIRIS CIRCUMSPICE which also marks the tomb of Christopher Wren.

Wikipedia: Statue of James S. T. Stranahan (EN)

32. La Plaza Cultural

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La Plaza Cultural de Armando Perez is an iconic community garden and public green space located in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. A community garden, park, playground, wildlife refuge, urban farm, community composting site, and performance venue, La Plaza Cultural is also utilized by local day-care centers, after-school programs and a growing number of parents with small children. The garden has been known to grow a number of various edible plants including fruits, vegetable, and herbs. The lot is approximately 0.64 acres and consists of at least 11 members.

Wikipedia: La Plaza Cultural de Armando Perez (EN)

33. Brooklyn Botanic Garden

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Brooklyn Botanic Garden (BBG) is a botanical garden in the borough of Brooklyn, New York City. It was founded in 1910 using land from Mount Prospect Park in central Brooklyn, adjacent to Prospect Park and the Brooklyn Museum. The 52-acre (21 ha) garden holds over 14,000 taxa of plants and has nearly a million visitors each year. It includes a number of specialty "gardens within the Garden", plant collections, the Steinhardt Conservatory that houses the C. V. Starr Bonsai Museum, three climate-themed plant pavilions, a white cast-iron-and-glass aquatic plant house, and an art gallery.

Wikipedia: Brooklyn Botanic Garden (EN)

34. Independence Flagstaff

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Independence Flagstaff, also known as the Charles F. Murphy Memorial Flagpole, is an outdoor memorial by sculptor Anthony de Francisci, located in Union Square Park in Manhattan, New York, which commemorates the 150th anniversary of the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence. The memorial was cast in 1926 and dedicated on July 4, 1930. It was made of steel, with copper sheathing, and is set on a granite pedestal which includes bronze bas-reliefs and plaques. The monument is in axial alignment with Henry Kirke Brown's statues of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

Wikipedia: Independence Flagstaff (EN)

35. David H. Koch Theater

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David H. Koch Theater Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The David H. Koch Theater is a theater for ballet, modern and other forms of dance, part of the Lincoln Center, at the intersection of Columbus Avenue and 63rd Street in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. Originally named the New York State Theater, the venue has been home to the New York City Ballet since its opening in 1964, the secondary venue for the American Ballet Theatre in the fall, and served as home to the New York City Opera from 1964 to 2011. The theater occupies the south side of the main plaza of Lincoln Center, opposite David Geffen Hall.

Wikipedia: David H. Koch Theater (EN)

36. Metropolitan Baptist Church

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The Metropolitan Baptist Church, located at 151 West 128th Street on the corner of Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, was originally built in two sections for the New York Presbyterian Church, which moved to the new building from 167 West 111th Street. The chapel and lecture room were built in 1884-85 and were designed by John Rochester Thomas, while the main sanctuary was constructed in 1889-90 and was designed by Richard R. Davis, perhaps following Thomas's unused design. A planned corner tower was never built.

Wikipedia: Metropolitan Baptist Church (New York City) (EN)

37. Unitarian Church of All Souls

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The Unitarian Church of All Souls at 1157 Lexington Avenue at East 80th Street in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City was built in 1932 and was designed by Hobart Upjohn – Richard Upjohn's grandson – in the Neo-colonial style with a Regency-influenced brick base. It is the congregation's fourth sanctuary. The congregation, dating back to 1819, was the first Unitarian Universalist congregation in the city. It has provided a pulpit for some of the movement's leading theologians and has also recorded many eminent persons in its membership.

Wikipedia: Unitarian Church of All Souls (EN)

38. Intrepid Museum

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The USS’’ Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum is an American military and maritime history museum in New York City with a collection of museum ships. It is located at Pier 86 at 46th Street, along the Hudson River, in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood on the West Side of Manhattan. The museum showcases the aircraft carrier USS Intrepid, the cruise missile submarine USS Growler, a Concorde SST, a Lockheed A-12 supersonic reconnaissance plane, and the Space Shuttle Enterprise. On the lower deck there is also a reproduction of a World War I biplane.

Wikipedia: Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum (EN)

39. Thomas Jefferson Park

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Thomas Jefferson Park is a 15. 52-acre (6. 28 ha) public park in the East Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. The park is on First Avenue between 111th and 114th Streets. It contains a playground as well as facilities for baseball, basketball, football, handball, running, skating, and soccer. The Thomas Jefferson Play Center within the park consists of a recreation center and a pool. The park and play center, named for former U. S. president Thomas Jefferson, are maintained by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.

Wikipedia: Thomas Jefferson Park (EN)

40. Metropolitan Opera House

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Metropolitan Opera House Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Metropolitan Opera House is an opera house located on Broadway at Lincoln Square on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. Part of Lincoln Center, the theater was designed by Wallace K. Harrison. It opened in 1966, replacing the original 1883 Metropolitan Opera House at Broadway and 39th Street. With a seating capacity of approximately 3,850, the house is the largest repertory opera house in the world. Home to the Metropolitan Opera Company, the facility also hosts the American Ballet Theatre in the summer months.

Wikipedia: Metropolitan Opera House (Lincoln Center) (EN)

41. Wonder Wheel

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The Wonder Wheel is a 150-foot-tall (46 m) eccentric Ferris wheel at Deno's Wonder Wheel Amusement Park at Coney Island in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The wheel is located on a plot bounded by West 12th Street to the west, Bowery Street to the north, Luna Park to the east, and the Riegelmann Boardwalk to the south. As with other eccentric Ferris wheels, some of the Wonder Wheel's passenger cabins are not fixed directly to the rim of the wheel, but instead slide along winding sets of rails between the hub and the rim.

Wikipedia: Wonder Wheel (EN)

42. Broadhurst Theatre

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Broadhurst Theatre Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Broadhurst Theatre is a Broadway theater at 235 West 44th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1917, the theater was designed by Herbert J. Krapp and was built for the Shubert brothers. The Broadhurst Theatre is named for British-American theatrical producer George Broadhurst, who leased the theater before its opening. It has 1,218 seats across two levels and is operated by The Shubert Organization. Both the facade and the auditorium interior are New York City landmarks.

Wikipedia: Broadhurst Theatre (EN)

43. Booth Theatre

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Booth Theatre Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Booth Theatre is a Broadway theater at 222 West 45th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1913, the theater was designed by Henry Beaumont Herts in the Italian Renaissance style and was built for the Shubert brothers. The venue was originally operated by Winthrop Ames, who named it for 19th-century American actor Edwin Booth. It has 800 seats across two levels and is operated by The Shubert Organization. The facade and parts of the interior are New York City landmarks.

Wikipedia: Booth Theatre (EN)

44. Most Precious Blood Church

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The Church of the Most Precious Blood is a Roman Catholic parish located in New York City. The parish is under the authority of the Archdiocese of New York, and is the National Shrine Church of San Gennaro. Located at 113 Baxter Street with an additional entrance on Mulberry Street, the Church of the Most Precious Blood is part of Manhattan's Little Italy neighborhood. The Most Precious Blood parished merged with Old St. Patrick's Cathedral parish, and the two churches share priests and administrative staff.

Wikipedia: Church of the Most Precious Blood, Manhattan (EN)

45. Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre

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Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, formerly the Plymouth Theatre, is a Broadway theater at 236 West 45th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1917, the theater was designed by Herbert J. Krapp and was built for the Shubert brothers. The Schoenfeld Theatre is named for Gerald Schoenfeld, longtime president of the Shubert Organization, which operates the theater. It has 1,079 seats across two levels. Both the facade and the auditorium interior are New York City landmarks.

Wikipedia: Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre (EN)

46. Queens Theater

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Queens Theater Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

Queens Theatre, formerly Queens Theatre in the Park and before that Queens Playhouse, is an American professional theatre, located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park, Queens, New York City, New York. Artistic and Executive Directors have included Joseph S. Kutrzeba, founder and producer; Robert Moss, Sue Lawless, Jeffrey Rosenstock and Ray Cullom, formerly Managing Director of Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, CT, and currently, Taryn Sacramone, former Executive Director of Astoria Performing Arts Center.

Wikipedia: Queens Theatre in the Park (EN)

47. Church of Saint Mary the Virgin

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The Church of Saint Mary the Virgin is an Episcopal Anglo-Catholic church in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, which is part of the Episcopal Diocese of New York of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. The church complex is located in the heart of Times Square at 133-145 West 46th Street, with other buildings of the complex at 136-144 West 47th Street, between Sixth and Seventh Avenues. It is colloquially known as "Smoky Mary's" because of the amount of incense used in the services.

Wikipedia: Church of Saint Mary the Virgin (Times Square, New York) (EN)

48. Calvary Church

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Calvary Church is an Episcopal church located at 277 Park Avenue South on the corner of East 21st Street in the Gramercy Park neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, on the border of the Flatiron District. It was designed by James Renwick Jr., the architect who designed St. Patrick's Cathedral and Grace Church, and was completed in 1848. The church complex is located within the Gramercy Park Historic District and Extension. It is one of the two sanctuaries of the Calvary-St. George's Parish.

Wikipedia: Calvary Church (Manhattan) (EN)

49. West End Collegiate Church

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The West End Collegiate Church is a church on West End Avenue at 77th Street on Manhattan's Upper West Side. It is part of The Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in the City of New York, the oldest Protestant church with a continuing organization in America. The Collegiate Church of New York is dually affiliated with the United Church of Christ (UCC) and the Reformed Church in America (RCA). The West End Collegiate Church is listed on the U. S. National Register of Historic Places.

Wikipedia: West End Collegiate Church (EN)

50. Church of the Most Holy Redeemer

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The Church of the Most Holy Redeemer, also known as Santísimo Redentor, is a Roman Catholic parish church under the authority of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, located at 161–165 East 3rd Street between Avenues A and B in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The parish was founded in 1844 by the Redemptorist Fathers, and the church, which looks more like a cathedral than a parish church, was built in 1851–1852, designed by an architect named Walsh.

Wikipedia: Church of the Most Holy Redeemer (Manhattan) (EN)

51. Maryland 400 Monument

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The Maryland 400 were members of the 1st Maryland Regiment who repeatedly charged a numerically superior British force during the Battle of Long Island during the Revolutionary War, sustaining heavy casualties, but allowing General Washington to successfully evacuate the bulk of his troops to Manhattan. This action is commemorated in Maryland's nickname, the "Old Line State." A monument in Brooklyn and multiple plaques were put up in the memory of this regiment and the fallen soldiers.

Wikipedia: Maryland 400 (EN)

52. Lefferts Historic House

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The Lefferts Historic House is located within Prospect Park in Brooklyn, New York City. Built circa 1783, it is the former home of enslaved persons and the family of Continental Army Lieutenant Pieter Lefferts. It currently operates as a museum of the Leffertses' family life in Kings County. The museum is part of the Historic House Trust, owned by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation and operated by the Prospect Park Alliance. It is a New York City designated landmark.

Wikipedia: Lefferts Historic House (EN)

53. Harriet Tubman Memorial

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The Harriet Tubman Memorial, also known as Swing Low, located in Manhattan in New York City, honors the life of abolitionist Harriet Tubman. The intersection at which it stands was previously a barren traffic island, and is now known as "Harriet Tubman Triangle". As part of its redevelopment, the traffic island was landscaped with plants native to New York and to Tubman's home state of Maryland, representing the land which she and her Underground Railroad passengers travelled across.

Wikipedia: Harriet Tubman Memorial (New York City) (EN)

54. Gay Liberation Monument

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The Gay Liberation Monument is part of the Stonewall National Monument, which commemorates the Stonewall uprising of 1969. Created in 1980, the Gay Liberation sculpture by American artist George Segal was the first piece of public art dedicated to gay rights and solidarity for LGBT individuals, while simultaneously commemorating the ongoing struggles of the community. The monument was dedicated on June 23, 1992, as part of the dedication of the Stonewall National Monument as a whole.

Wikipedia: Gay Liberation Monument (EN)

55. St. Cecilia's Church

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St. Cecilia Church is a Roman Catholic parish church in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York and a historic landmark located at 120 East 106th Street between Park Avenue and Lexington Avenue, Manhattan, New York City, New York. The parish was established in 1873. It was staffed by the Redemptorist Fathers from 1939 to 2007. The church was designated a New York City landmark in 1976. The church and convent were listed on the U. S. National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Wikipedia: St. Cecilia's Church and Convent (New York City) (EN)

56. Crack Is Wack

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Crack Is Wack is a mural created in 1986 by American artist and social activist Keith Haring. Located near the Harlem River Drive in East Harlem, the mural serves as a warning against crack cocaine use, which was rampant in major cities across the United States during the mid to late 1980s. As a symbol of anti-drug activism, Crack Is Wack commemorates Haring's powerful sociopolitical presence as an artist and remains a part of New York City's repertoire of iconic public art.

Wikipedia: Crack Is Wack (EN)

57. Hamilton Fish Park

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Hamilton Fish Park is a public park in the Lower East Side neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. The park encompasses two blocks bounded by Houston, Pitt, Sheriff, and Stanton Streets. It contains a playground, basketball courts, and an outdoor swimming complex with general swimming and wading pools. Hamilton Fish Park also includes a Beaux-Arts recreation center designed by Carrère and Hastings. It is maintained by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.

Wikipedia: Hamilton Fish Park Pool (EN)

58. Church of the Holy Apostles

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The Church of the Holy Apostles is an Episcopal parish located at 296 Ninth Avenue at 28th Street in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Its historic church building was built from 1845 to 1848, and was designed by New York architect Minard Lafever. The geometric stained-glass windows were designed by William Jay Bolton. The church faces Chelsea Park across 9th Avenue. The building is a New York City landmark and on the National Register of Historic Places.

Wikipedia: Church of the Holy Apostles (Manhattan) (EN)

59. Saint Bartholomew's Episcopal Church

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St. Bartholomew's Protestant Episcopal Church and Rectory is a historic Episcopal church and rectory located at 1227 Pacific St., east of Bedford Avenue in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, New York, New York. It was built in 1886 in the Romanesque Revival style. It is constructed of brick with stone trim and topped by a slate roof. It features a squat, battered stone tower crowned by an ogival, tiled roof. The two story brick and stone rectory features twin gables and ogival tower.

Wikipedia: St. Bartholomew's Protestant Episcopal Church and Rectory (EN)

60. Bertel Thorvaldsen

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Bertel Thorvaldsen was a Danish and Icelandic sculptor medalist of international fame, who spent most of his life (1797–1838) in Italy. Thorvaldsen was born in Copenhagen into a working-class Danish/Icelandic family, and was accepted to the Royal Danish Academy of Art at the age of eleven. Working part-time with his father, who was a wood carver, Thorvaldsen won many honors and medals at the academy. He was awarded a stipend to travel to Rome and continue his education.

Wikipedia: Bertel Thorvaldsen (EN)

61. El Museo Del Barrio

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El Museo del Barrio, often known simply as El Museo, is a museum at 1230 Fifth Avenue in Upper Manhattan, New York City. It is located near the northern end of Fifth Avenue's Museum Mile, immediately north of the Museum of the City of New York. Founded in 1969, El Museo specializes in Latin American and Caribbean art, with an emphasis on works from Puerto Rico and the Puerto Rican community in New York City. It is the oldest museum of the country dedicated to Latino art.

Wikipedia: El Museo del Barrio (EN)

62. Grace Church

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Grace Church is a historic parish church in Manhattan, New York City which is part of the Episcopal Diocese of New York. The church is located at 800–804 Broadway, at the corner of East 10th Street, where Broadway bends to the south-southeast, bringing it in alignment with the avenues in Manhattan's grid. Grace Church School and the church houses—which are now used by the school—are located to the east at 86–98 Fourth Avenue between East 10th and 12th Streets.

Wikipedia: Grace Church (Manhattan) (EN)

63. Merchant's House Museum

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Merchant's House Museum Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Merchant's House Museum, known formerly as the Old Merchant's House and as the Seabury Tredwell House, is the only nineteenth-century family home in New York City preserved intact—both inside and out. Built "on speculation" in 1832 by Joseph Brewster, a hatter by trade, it is located at 29 East Fourth Street, between Lafayette Street and the Bowery in Manhattan. It became a museum in 1936, founded by George Chapman, a cousin of the family who once lived there.

Wikipedia: Merchant's House Museum (EN)

64. Queens Botanical Gardens

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Queens Botanical Garden is a botanical garden located at 43-50 Main Street in Flushing, Queens, New York City. The 39-acre (16 ha) site features rose, bee, herb, wedding, and perennial gardens; an arboretum; an art gallery; and a LEED-certified Visitor & Administration Building. Queens Botanical Garden is located on property owned by the City of New York, and is funded from several public and private sources. It is operated by Queens Botanical Garden Society, Inc.

Wikipedia: Queens Botanical Garden (EN)

65. Prison Ship Martyrs Monument

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The Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument is a war memorial at Fort Greene Park, in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It commemorates more than 11,500 American prisoners of war who died in captivity aboard sixteen British prison ships during the American Revolutionary War. The remains of a small fraction of those who died on the ships are interred in a crypt beneath its base. The ships included HMS Jersey, Scorpion, Hope, Falmouth, Stromboli, Hunter, and others.

Wikipedia: Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument (EN)

66. Central Park Zoo

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The Central Park Zoo is a 6.5-acre (2.6 ha) zoo located at the southeast corner of Central Park in New York City. It is part of an integrated system of four zoos and one aquarium managed by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). In conjunction with the Central Park Zoo's operations, the WCS offers children's educational programs, is engaged in restoration of endangered species populations, and reaches out to the local community through volunteer programs.

Wikipedia: Central Park Zoo (EN)

67. Coney Island Cyclone

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The Cyclone, also the Coney Island Cyclone, is a wooden roller coaster at Luna Park in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York City. Designed by Vernon Keenan, it opened to the public on June 26, 1927. The roller coaster is on a plot of land at the intersection of Surf Avenue and West 10th Street. The Cyclone reaches a maximum speed of 60 miles per hour (97 km/h) and has a total track length of 2,640 feet (800 m), with a maximum height of 85 feet (26 m).

Wikipedia: Coney Island Cyclone (EN)

68. Cadman Plaza Park

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Cadman Plaza is a park located on the border of the Brooklyn Heights and Downtown Brooklyn neighborhoods in Brooklyn, New York City. Named for Reverend Doctor Samuel Parkes Cadman (1864–1936), a renowned minister in the Brooklyn Congregational Church, it is built on land reclaimed by condemnation in 1935 and was named as a park in 1939. The park borders Cadman Plaza West and Cadman Plaza East and the west and east sides of the plaza, respectively.

Wikipedia: Cadman Plaza (EN)

69. Barrymore Theatre

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The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is a Broadway theater at 241 West 47th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1928, it was designed by Herbert J. Krapp in the Elizabethan, Mediterranean, and Adam styles for the Shubert family. The theater, named in honor of actress Ethel Barrymore, has 1,058 seats and is operated by the Shubert Organization. Both the facade and the auditorium interior are New York City landmarks.

Wikipedia: Ethel Barrymore Theatre (EN)

70. Apollo Theater

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Apollo Theater Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Apollo Theater is a music hall at 253 West 125th Street between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard and Frederick Douglass Boulevard in the Harlem neighborhood of Upper Manhattan in New York City. It is a noted venue for African-American performers, and is the home of Showtime at the Apollo, a nationally syndicated television variety show which showcased new talent, from 1987 to 2008, encompassing 1,093 episodes; the show was rebooted in 2018.

Wikipedia: Apollo Theater (EN)

71. Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument

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The Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial Monument is a monument located at 89th Street and Riverside Drive in Riverside Park in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City. It commemorates Union Army soldiers and sailors who served in the American Civil War. It is an enlarged version of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates in Athens, and was designed by the firm of Stoughton & Stoughton with Paul E. M. DuBoy. The monument was completed in 1902.

Wikipedia: Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument (Manhattan) (EN)

72. Park Slope Jewish Center

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The Park Slope Jewish Center, known from 1942 to 1960 as Congregation B'nai Jacob - Tifereth Israel, is an egalitarian Conservative synagogue located at 1320 Eighth Avenue in South Slope, Brooklyn, New York City. It was built in 1925 as the orthodox Congregation B'nai Jacob, and is a 2+1⁄2-story brick building with Romanesque and Baroque style elements. It features the Star of David on exterior masonry, a rose window, and a domed skylight.

Wikipedia: Park Slope Jewish Center (EN)

73. The Blockhouse

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Blockhouse No. 1, colloquially known as The Blockhouse, is a small fort in the North Woods section of Central Park, Manhattan, New York City. Finished in 1814, the Blockhouse is the second-oldest structure in the park, after Cleopatra's Needle, and the oldest surviving structure originally built within the park site. It is located on an overlook of Manhattan schist, with a clear view of the flat surrounding areas north of Central Park.

Wikipedia: Blockhouse No. 1 (Central Park) (EN)

74. Saint Michael's Church

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St. Michael's Church is a historic Episcopal church at 225 West 99th Street and Amsterdam Avenue on Manhattan's Upper West Side in New York City. The parish was founded on the present site in January 1807, at that time in the rural Bloomingdale District. The present limestone Romanesque building, the third on the site, was built in 1890–91 to designs by Robert W. Gibson and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.

Wikipedia: St. Michael's Church, New York City (EN)

75. St. Lucy's Church

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St. Lucy's Church is a former parish church of the Parish of St. Lucy, which operated under the authority of the Archdiocese of New York in the East Harlem section of the Borough of Manhattan in New York City. The parish address was 344 East 104th Street; the parochial school occupied 336 East 104th Street. The parish merged with St. Ann's Church in 2015, and Masses and other sacraments are no longer offered regularly at this church.

Wikipedia: St. Lucy's Church (Manhattan) (EN)

76. Corbin Building

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The Corbin Building is a historic office building at the northeast corner of John Street and Broadway in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. It was built in 1888–1889 as a speculative development and was designed by Francis H. Kimball in the Romanesque Revival style with French Gothic detailing. The building was named for Austin Corbin, a president of the Long Island Rail Road who also founded several banks.

Wikipedia: Corbin Building (EN)

77. Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre

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Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a Broadway theater at 242 West 45th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1927, the theater was designed by Herbert J. Krapp in a Spanish style and was built for real-estate developer Irwin S. Chanin. It has 1,100 seats across two levels and is operated by The Shubert Organization. Both the facade and the auditorium interior are New York City landmarks.

Wikipedia: Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre (EN)

78. General Grant National Memorial

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Grant's Tomb, officially the General Grant National Memorial, is the final resting place of Ulysses S. Grant, 18th president of the United States, and his wife, Julia Grant. It is a classical domed mausoleum in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Upper Manhattan in New York City. The structure is in the middle of Riverside Drive at 122nd Street, across from Riverside Church to the southeast and Riverside Park to the west.

Wikipedia: Grant's Tomb (EN)

79. Marcus Garvey Memorial Park

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Marcus Garvey Park is a 20.16-acre (81,600 m2) park on the border between the Harlem and East Harlem neighborhoods of Manhattan, New York City. The park, centered on a massive and steep outcropping of schist, interrupts the flow of Fifth Avenue traffic, which is routed around the park via Mount Morris Park West. The park is also bounded by 120th Street to the south, 124th Street to the north, and Madison Avenue to the east.

Wikipedia: Marcus Garvey Park (EN)

80. Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts

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Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It has thirty indoor and outdoor facilities and is host to 5 million visitors annually. It houses internationally renowned performing arts organizations including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet, and the Juilliard School.

Wikipedia: Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (EN)

81. Trinity Lutheran Church of Manhattan

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Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church of Manhattan is a Lutheran church located at 164 West 100th Street just east of Amsterdam Avenue, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. It was founded in 1888 as the German Evangelical Lutheran Church to serve German immigrants moving into the Upper West Side. It initially held services in a storefront until money had been raised to buy land and build a sanctuary.

Wikipedia: Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church of Manhattan (EN)

82. Duarte Square

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Juan Pablo Duarte Square, usually shortened to Duarte Square, is a 0.45-acre (0.18 ha) triangular park in Hudson Square, in Lower Manhattan, New York City. The park, operated by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, is bound by Sullivan Street and the LentSpace plot to the west, Grand Street to the north, Sixth Avenue to the east, and Canal Street and Albert Capsouto Park to the south.

Wikipedia: Duarte Square (EN)

83. Brooklyn Museum

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The Brooklyn Museum is an art museum located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. At 560,000 square feet (52,000 m2), the museum is New York City's second largest and contains an art collection with around 1.5 million objects. Located near the Prospect Heights, Crown Heights, Flatbush, and Park Slope neighborhoods of Brooklyn, the museum's Beaux-Arts building was designed by McKim, Mead and White.

Wikipedia: Brooklyn Museum (EN)

84. Church of the Incarnation

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The Church of the Incarnation is a historic Episcopal church at 205–209 Madison Avenue at the northeast corner of 35th Street in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The church was founded in 1850 as a chapel of Grace Church located at 28th Street and Madison. In 1852, it became an independent parish, and in 1864–1865 the parish built its own sanctuary at its current location.

Wikipedia: Church of the Incarnation, Episcopal (Manhattan) (EN)

85. Federal Hall National Memorial

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Federal Hall National Memorial Ajay Suresh from New York, NY, USA / CC BY 2.0

Federal Hall is a historic building at 26 Wall Street in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. The current Greek Revival–style building, completed in 1842 as the Custom House, is operated by the National Park Service as a national memorial called the Federal Hall National Memorial. The memorial is named after a Federal style building on the same site, completed in 1703 as City Hall.

Wikipedia: Federal Hall (EN)

86. Steeplechase Park

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Steeplechase Park was a 15-acre (6.1 ha) amusement park in Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York City. Steeplechase Park was created by entrepreneur George C. Tilyou in 1897 and operated until 1964. It was the first of the three large amusement parks built on Coney Island, the other two being Luna Park (1903) and Dreamland (1904). Of the three, Steeplechase was the longest-lasting, running for 67 years.

Wikipedia: Steeplechase Park (EN)

87. Daily News Building

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The Daily News Building, also known as The News Building, is a skyscraper at 220 East 42nd Street in the Turtle Bay neighborhood of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. The original building was designed by architects Raymond Hood and John Mead Howells in the Art Deco style, and was erected between 1928 and 1930. A later addition was designed by Harrison & Abramovitz and built between 1957 and 1960.

Wikipedia: Daily News Building (EN)

88. Church of the Transfiguration

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The Church of the Transfiguration, also known as the Little Church Around the Corner, is an Episcopal parish church located at 1 East 29th Street, between Madison and Fifth Avenues in the NoMad neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The congregation was founded in 1848 by George Hendric Houghton and worshiped in a home at 48 East 29th Street until the church was built and consecrated in 1849.

Wikipedia: Church of the Transfiguration, Episcopal (Manhattan) (EN)

89. Church of the Ascension

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Church of the Ascension David Shankbone; cropped by Beyond My Ken 20:11, 26 March 2011 (UTC) / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The Church of the Ascension is an Episcopal church in the Diocese of New York, located at 36–38 Fifth Avenue and West 10th Street in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan New York City. It was built in 1840–41, the first church to be built on Fifth Avenue and was designed by Richard Upjohn in the Gothic Revival style. The interior was remodeled by Stanford White in 1885–88.

Wikipedia: Church of the Ascension, Episcopal (Manhattan) (EN)

90. Brick Presbyterian Church

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The Brick Presbyterian Church is a large congregation at Park Avenue and 91st Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City. A member of the Presbyterian Church, it is known for its Day School and music programs. It was founded as an offshoot of First Presbyterian Church. Its first building, in Lower Manhattan, opened in 1768. The Park Avenue location opened April 14, 1940.

Wikipedia: Brick Presbyterian Church (New York City) (EN)

91. West Side Jewish Center

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Congregation Beth Israel / West Side Jewish Center / Hudson Yards Synagogue is an Orthodox congregation located at 347 West 34th Street, Manhattan, New York, in the Garment District, near Penn Station. Established in 1890, it constructed its current building in 1924–1925. Rabbis have included Joseph Schick, Norman Lamm, and Solomon Kahane. As of 2019, the rabbi was Jason Herman.

Wikipedia: Congregation Beth Israel West Side Jewish Center (EN)

92. Reclining Figure

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Reclining Figure 1963–5 is a statue by Henry Moore. The original two-part bronze statue of a human figure was commissioned for the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City, where it has been displayed outdoors since 1965 in a pool of water to the north of the new Metropolitan Opera House. Other copies in plaster or bronze exist, and are displayed in other cities.

Wikipedia: Reclining Figure (Lincoln Center) (EN)

93. Quester I

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Quester I is the name of a 45-foot (14 m) submarine built in 1967 by Jerry Bianco, a shipyard worker in Brooklyn, New York City. Bianco built the submarine from salvaged metal, with the goal of either raising, or salvaging valuables from, the wreck of the Italian passenger liner SS Andrea Doria, which sank off Nantucket Sound in 1956 after being hit broadside by another liner.

Wikipedia: Quester I (EN)

94. Brower Park

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Brower Park is a municipal park in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, New York City. It is located between Brooklyn Avenue to the west and Kingston Avenue to the east, and between St. Marks Avenue to the north and Park Place to the south. The T-shaped park encompasses roughly 4 acres (1. 6 ha) and shares a square block with the Brooklyn Children's Museum and P. S. 289 George V Brower.

Wikipedia: Brower Park (EN)

95. Elizabeth Street Garden

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Elizabeth Street Garden (ESG) is a one-acre (0.40 ha) community sculpture garden in the Nolita neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, located on Elizabeth Street between Prince and Spring Streets. The garden is managed by Elizabeth Street Garden, Inc. (ESG), a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and open to the public for general use and community events by ESG volunteers.

Wikipedia: Elizabeth Street Garden (EN)

96. Hess Triangle

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Hess Triangle Chris Hamby / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Hess triangle is a triangular tile mosaic set in a sidewalk in New York City's West Village neighborhood at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Christopher Street. The plaque reads "Property of the Hess Estate which has never been dedicated for public purposes." The plaque is an isosceles triangle, with a 25+1⁄2-inch (65 cm) base and 27+1⁄2-inch (70 cm) legs (sides).

Wikipedia: Hess triangle (EN)

97. Conservatory Garden

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The Conservatory Garden is a formal garden near the northeastern corner of Central Park in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Comprising 6 acres (24,000 m2), it is the only formal garden in Central Park. Conservatory Garden takes its name from a conservatory that stood on the site from 1898 to 1935. It is located just west of Fifth Avenue, opposite 104th to 106th Streets.

Wikipedia: Conservatory Garden (EN)

98. Drumgoole Plaza

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Drumgoole Plaza This photo was taken by participant/team official-ly cool as part of the Commons:Wikipedia Takes Manhattan project on April 4, 2008. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
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Under the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. share alike – If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you must distribute your contributions under the same or compatible license as the original.
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0CC BY-SA 3.0 Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 truetrue / CC BY-SA 3.0

Drumgoole Plaza is a public park that sits below the ramps to the Brooklyn Bridge in Manhattan, New York City, on Frankfort Street between Park Row and Gold Street, and next to the main building of Pace University at One Pace Plaza. Opened on November 5, 2003, the park is maintained by Pace under the management of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.

Wikipedia: Drumgoole Plaza (EN)

99. Captain Tilly Park

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Captain Tilly Park is a 9.16-acre (3.71 ha) park in Jamaica Hills, Queens, New York, north of downtown Jamaica. It is bordered by 165th Street to the west, 85th Avenue to the north, Chapin Parkway and Gothic Drive to the northeast, and Highland Avenue to the south. The park consists of a kettle pond named Goose Pond, the only remaining kettle pond in Jamaica Hills.

Wikipedia: Captain Tilly Park (EN)

100. Statue of Christopher Columbus

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A statue of Christopher Columbus by artist Emma Stebbins and architect Aymar Embury II, also known as the Christopher Columbus Memorial, is installed outside the New York State Supreme Court in Brooklyn’s Columbus Park, in the U. S. state of New York. The memorial is made of Italian marble and limestone. It was cast c.  1867, and donated by Marshal O. Roberts.

Wikipedia: Statue of Christopher Columbus (Brooklyn) (EN)

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.

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