11 Sights in Cambridge, United States (with Map and Images)

Looking for premium sights?

Here you can book tickets, guided tours and other activities in Cambridge:

Get tickets and guided tours now *

Here you can find interesting sights in Cambridge, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 11 sights are available in Cambridge, United States.

Back to the list of cities in United States

1. Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology

Show sight on map
Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Daderot / Public domain

The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is a museum affiliated with Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1866, the Peabody Museum is one of the oldest and largest museums focusing on anthropological material, with particular focus on the ethnography and archaeology of the Americas. The museum is caretaker to over 1.2 million objects, some 900 feet (270 m) of documents, 2,000 maps and site plans, and approximately 500,000 photographs. The museum is located at Divinity Avenue on the Harvard University campus. The museum is one of the four Harvard Museums of Science and Culture open to the public.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

2. Gift of the Wind

Show sight on map
Gift of the Wind Artwork by Susumu Shingu / Public domain

Gift of the Wind is a large-scale public kinetic sculpture, by Susumu Shingu, located in Porter Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts at the Porter, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority subway and commuter rail station. The art work consists of a tall white pole with three red "wings" attached to the top that are "designed to shift in response to the movement of the wind, not only turning clockwise and counterclockwise, but tumbling over and over in various sequences." It is considered by some to be "Cambridge's most visible landmark".>

Wikipedia (EN)

3. Edwin Abbot House

Show sight on map
Edwin Abbot House Daderot / Public domain

The Edwin Abbot House, also known as the Zabriskie House, is an historic house at 27 Garden Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Built in 1889 to a design by Longfellow, Alden & Harlow, it is a prominent local example of residential Richardsonian Romanesque architecture. It has served as the principal building of the Longy School since 1937. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, and included in the Follen Street Historic District in 1986.

Wikipedia (EN)

4. John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site

Show sight on map
John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site Carol M. Highsmith / Public domain

The John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site is the birthplace and childhood home of John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States. The house is at 83 Beals Street in the Coolidge Corner neighborhood of Brookline, Massachusetts. Kennedy is one of four U. S. presidents born in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. The property is now owned by the National Park Service; tours of the house are offered, and a film is presented.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

5. Harvard Yard

Show sight on map
Harvard Yard Nina R from Africa / CC BY 2.0

Harvard Yard, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is the oldest part of the Harvard University campus, its historic center and modern crossroads. It contains most of the freshman dormitories, Harvard's most important libraries, Memorial Church, several classroom and departmental buildings, and the offices of senior University officials including the President of Harvard University.

Wikipedia (EN)

6. Restauracion

Show sight on map

The former First Unitarian Church is a historic church building at 130 Highland Avenue in Somerville, Massachusetts. The stone church was built in 1894 for a Unitarian congregation. It was designed by Hartwell & Richardson and is a good example of Richardsonian Romanesque design. The building presently (2022) houses the Mission Church of Our Lord Jesus Christ.

Wikipedia (EN)

7. The Hiker

Show sight on map
The Hiker Statue by Theodora Kitson, unknown photographer / Public domain

The Hiker is a statue created by Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson. It commemorates the American soldiers who fought in the Spanish–American War, the Boxer Rebellion and the Philippine–American War. The first version of it was made for the University of Minnesota in 1906, but at least 50 copies were made, and were erected widely across the United States.

Wikipedia (EN)

8. Harry Agganis

Show sight on map
Harry Agganis / Fair use

Aristotle George "Harry" Agganis, nicknamed "The Golden Greek", was an American college football player and professional baseball player. After passing up a potential professional football career, he played in Major League Baseball as a first baseman from 1954 to 1955 for the Boston Red Sox.

Wikipedia (EN)

9. Irish Famine Memorial

Show sight on map

The Irish Famine Memorial, also known as the Irish Famine Monument, is installed in Cambridge Common, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. The monument was designed by Maurice Harrow, and dedicated by Ireland President Mary Robinson in July 1997.

Wikipedia (EN)

10. Marsh Chapel

Show sight on map

Marsh Chapel is a building on the campus of Boston University used as the official place of worship of the school. It was named for Daniel L. Marsh, a former president of BU and a Methodist minister. The building is Gothic in style.

Wikipedia (EN), Instagram, Website

11. Statue of John Bridge

Show sight on map
Statue of John Bridge en:Leslie Ronald Jones / Public domain

The John Bridge Monument, in the northeast corner of the Cambridge Common in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was given by Samuel James Bridge in honor of his ancestor John Bridge (1578–1665) and sculpted by Thomas R. Gould.

Wikipedia (EN)

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.