86 Sights in Mexico City, Mexico (with Map and Images)

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Explore interesting sights in Mexico City, Mexico. Click on a marker on the map to view details about it. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 86 sights are available in Mexico City, Mexico.

Sightseeing Tours in Mexico CityActivities in Mexico City

1. Fuente de la Diana Cazadora

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The Huntress Diana Fountain is a monumental fountain of Diana located in the roundabout at Paseo de la Reforma and Río Misisipí and Sevilla streets, on the border of the Colonia Cuauhtémoc and Colonia Juárez neighborhoods of Mexico City. Nearby landmarks named after the fountain include the Cine Diana and the skyscrapers Corporativo Reforma Diana and Torre Diana.

Wikipedia: Diana the Huntress Fountain (EN)

2. Frida Kahlo Museum

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Frida Kahlo Museum No machine-readable author provided. Nachtwächter assumed (based on copyright claims). / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Frida Kahlo Museum, also known as the Blue House for the structure's cobalt-blue walls, is a historic house museum and art museum dedicated to the life and work of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. It is located in the Colonia del Carmen neighborhood of Coyoacán in Mexico City. The building was Kahlo's birthplace, the home where she grew up, lived with her husband Diego Rivera for a number of years, and where she later died in a room on the upper floor. In 1957, Diego Rivera donated the home and its contents to turn it into a museum in Frida's honor.

Wikipedia: Frida Kahlo Museum (EN), Url

3. National Autonomous University of Mexico

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National Autonomous University of Mexico

The National Autonomous University of Mexico is a public research university in Mexico. A portion of Ciudad Universitaria is a UNESCO World Heritage site that was designed and decorated by some of Mexico's best-known architects and painters. The campus hosted the main events of the 1968 Summer Olympics, and was the birthplace of the student movement of 1968. All Mexican Nobel laureates are either alumni or faculty of UNAM.

Wikipedia: National Autonomous University of Mexico (EN)

4. Casa Lamm

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Casa Lamm

The Casa Lamm Cultural Center is the best known landmark in Colonia Roma. It was a house built in the early 20th century when Colonia Roma was a new neighborhood for the wealthy leaving the historic center of Mexico City. In the 1990s, the house was restored to open as a cultural center in 1994, with the aim of making the area a center for the visual arts. Today, it hosts numerous exhibits as well as offering classes, even degrees, in art and literature.

Wikipedia: Casa Lamm (EN)

5. Fuente de Cibeles

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The Fountain of Cybele in Mexico City is a bronze replica of the fountain located in the Plaza de Cibeles in Madrid that was built during the reign of Charles III by architect Ventura Rodríguez between 1777 and 1792. The Mexican version is located at a traffic circle in Plaza Villa de Madrid, where Oaxaca, Durango, Medellín and El Oro streets converge in Colonia Roma.

Wikipedia: Fuente de Cibeles (Mexico City) (EN)

6. Parque México

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The Parque México, officially Parque San Martín, is a large urban park located in Colonia Hipódromo in the Condesa area of Mexico City. It is recognized by its Art Deco architecture and decor as well as being one of the larger green areas in the city. In 1927, when the surrounding neighborhood of Colonia Hipódromo was being built, the park was developed on the former site of the horse race track of the Jockey Club de México. Today, Parque México is not only the center of Colonia Hipódromo, it is also the cultural center of the entire La Condesa section of the city.

Wikipedia: Parque México (EN)

7. Estela de Luz

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The Estela de Luz is a monument in Mexico City built in 2011 to commemorate the bicentenary of Mexico's independence from Spanish rule. Its design was the winning entry in an invited competition to seek the best combination of Mexico's past and future; the design uses quartz and electric lighting to achieve this effect. The Estela de Luz is mainly used for cultural events. Below it, the Centro de Cultura Digital cultural complex was built.

Wikipedia: Estela de Luz (EN)

8. Monumento a los Niños Héroes

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The Monumento a los Niños Héroes, officially Altar a la Patria, is a monument installed in the park of Chapultepec in Mexico City, Mexico. It commemorates the Niños Héroes, six mostly teenage military cadets who were killed defending Mexico City from the United States during the Battle of Chapultepec, one of the last major battles of the Mexican–American War, on 13 September 1847.

Wikipedia: Monumento a los Niños Héroes (EN)

9. Palacio de Bellas Artes

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The Palacio de Bellas Artes is a prominent cultural center in Mexico City. This hosts performing arts events, literature events and plastic arts galleries and exhibitions. "Bellas Artes" for short, has been called the "art cathedral of Mexico", and is located on the western side of the historic center of Mexico City which is close to the Alameda Central park.

Wikipedia: Palacio de Bellas Artes (EN), Website

10. Templo Mayor

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The Templo Mayor was the main temple of the Mexica people in their capital city of Tenochtitlan, which is now Mexico City. Its architectural style belongs to the late Postclassic period of Mesoamerica. The temple was called Huēyi Teōcalli in the Nahuatl language. It was dedicated simultaneously to Huitzilopochtli, god of war, and Tlaloc, god of rain and agriculture, each of which had a shrine at the top of the pyramid with separate staircases. The central spire was devoted to Quetzalcoatl in his form as the wind god, Ehecatl. The Great Temple devoted to Huitzilopochtli and Tlaloc, measuring approximately 100 by 80 m at its base, dominated the Sacred Precinct. Construction of the first temple began sometime after 1325, and it was rebuilt six times. The temple was destroyed by the Spanish in 1521, and the Mexico City cathedral was built in its place.

Wikipedia: Templo Mayor (EN)

11. Sol

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Sol is a monumental sculpture made by Japanese artist Kiyoshi Takahashi as part of the Friendship Route, a set of 19 sculptures made by artists of various nationalities to commemorate the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico. The work was installed at the intersection of the Peripheral Ring Road and Santa Teresa Street, south of Mexico City. It was the fourth station on the route and represented Japan at the exhibition.

Wikipedia: Sol (escultura) (ES), Website

12. Fonoteca Nacional

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Fonoteca Nacional

The National Sound Library is a Mexican institution under the Ministry of Culture that preserves sound heritage and promotes the culture of listening and sound through five priority activities: rescuing and preserving the country's sound heritage; to publicise the sound heritage it protects; carry out academic, artistic and cultural activities related to sound; to foster a culture of listening among the population, and to stimulate the creation and experimentation of sound art.

Wikipedia: Fonoteca Nacional (ES)

13. De las soluciones: una utopía posible, síntesis

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Arnold Belkin was a Canadian-Mexican painter credited for continuing the Mexican muralism tradition at a time when many Mexican painters were shifting away from it. Born and raised in western Canada, he trained as an artist there but was not drawn to traditional Canadian art. Instead he was inspired by images of Diego Rivera's work in a magazine to move to Mexico when he was only eighteen. He studied further in Mexico, focusing his education and his career mostly on murals, creating a type of work he called a "portable mural" as a way to adapt it to new architectural style. He also had a successful career creating canvas works as well with several notable series of paintings. He spent most of his life and career in Mexico except for a stay in New York City in the late 1960s to mid-1970s. His best known works are the murals he created for the University Autónoma Metropolitana in the Iztapalapa borough of Mexico City.

Wikipedia: Arnold Belkin (EN)

14. Museo de la Ciudad de México

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The Museum of Mexico City is located at Pino Suarez 30, a few blocks south of the Zocalo, on what was the Iztapalapa Causeway, near where Hernán Cortés and Moctezuma II met for the first time. This building used to be the palace of the Counts of Santiago de Calimaya, who were the descendants of one of the conquistadors with Cortés. The house was extensively remodeled during the colony to much the appearance that it has today and remained in the family until 1960, when the Mexico City government acquired it from them in order to found the Museum that is found there today. The museum contains a number of elements of the old palace as well as 26 rooms dedicated to the history and development of Mexico City from Aztec times to the present. It also contains a library and the studios of painter Joaquín Clausell, who lived here in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Wikipedia: Museum of Mexico City (EN)

15. Vivero Coyoacán

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Viveros de Coyoacán is a combination tree nursery and public park which covers 38.9 hectares in the Coyoacán borough of Mexico City. The nursery was founded by Miguel Angel de Quevedo in the early 20th century as a way to provide seedlings for the reforestation of Mexico's badly damaged forests, especially around Mexico City. The first lands were donated by Quevedo himself with the federal government then getting involved, allowing for the planting of 140,000 trees between 1913 and 1914 alone. Today, the nursery produces one million seedlings per year mostly for projects around Mexico City. The area was declared a national park in 1938 and today attracts between 2,500 and 3,000 visitors daily, many of whom come to exercise or feed the area's very tame squirrels. The overpopulation of squirrels and a large rat population have been problems for the park.

Wikipedia: Viveros de Coyoacán (EN)

16. Obelisco a los Niños Héroes

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The Obelisco a los Niños Héroes is a monument installed in Chapultepec, Mexico City. The cenotaph was created in 1881 by architect Ramón Rodríguez Arangoity, one of the cadets captured in the Battle of Chapultepec. The marble cenotaph was a typical nineteenth-century monument. This one lists the names of the six cadets, the Niños Héroes, killed in the fierce fighting in the Mexican–American War as military cadets defended as well as the 40 who survived the attack. For his own political purposes, General Porfirio Díaz inaugurated the monument with a military and civilian audience of dignitaries. Subsequently, the obelisk became an annual site of remembrance for the Association of the Military College, a group of veterans who had been cadets. This modest-sized monument was superseded in 1952 by the massive Monumento a los Niños Héroes.

Wikipedia: Obelisco a los Niños Héroes (EN)

17. Constitution Square

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Constitution SquareComisión Mexicana de Filmaciones from México D. F., México / CC BY-SA 2.0

Zócalo is the common name of the main square in central Mexico City. Prior to the colonial period, it was the main ceremonial center in the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. The plaza used to be known simply as the "Main Square" or "Arms Square", and today its formal name is Plaza de la Constitución. This name does not come from any of the Mexican constitutions that have governed the country but rather from the Cádiz Constitution, which was signed in Spain in the year 1812. Even so, it is almost always called the Zócalo today. Plans were made to erect a column as a monument to independence, but only the base, or zócalo, was built. The plinth was buried long ago, but the name has lived on. Many other Mexican towns and cities, such as Oaxaca, Mérida, and Guadalajara, have adopted the word zócalo to refer to their main plazas, but not all.

Wikipedia: Zócalo (EN)

18. Museo Nacional de Culturas Populares

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Museo Nacional de las Culturas Populares is a museum in Mexico City dedicated to Mexico's ethnic and cultural diversity. This diversity not only includes that of its indigenous peoples, but also those of its regions and socioeconomic strata. It was founded in 1982 by anthropologist Guillermo Bonfil Batalla at a time when the country was accepting and promoting its cultural diversity. The museum does not have a large permanent collection but rather focuses on temporary exhibits, concerts, workshops and other cultural and educational events as well as promoting the creation of museums in Mexico to promote local cultures. The museum is also home to the Centro de Información y Documentación Alberto Beltrán, founded in 1971 to promote research and knowledge about Mexican handcrafts and folk art and indigenous ethnicities.

Wikipedia: Museo Nacional de Culturas Populares (EN)

19. Arena México

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Arena México

Arena México is an indoor arena in Mexico City, Mexico, located in the Colonia Doctores neighborhood in the Cuauhtémoc borough. The arena is primarily used for professional wrestling, or lucha libre, shows promoted by Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre (CMLL). The building is called the "cathedral of lucha libre". Arena México has a seating capacity of 16,500 when configured for professional wrestling or boxing events. The current building was completed in 1956, built by Salvador Lutteroth, owner of CMLL at the time and is the largest arena built specifically for wrestling. The building was used as the venue for the boxing competition at the 1968 Summer Olympics, and throughout the last half of the 20th century hosted several large boxing events.

Wikipedia: Arena México (EN)

20. Hombre de Paz

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Man of Peace is a monumental sculpture made by the Italian artist Constantino Nivola as part of the Friendship Route, a set of 19 sculptures made by artists of various nationalities to commemorate the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico. The work was installed in the Olympic Village in Mexico City. It was the seventh station on the route and represented Italy at the exhibition. The sculpture consists of a quadrangular prism that has two other prisms of different proportions on top of it. At the tip of the structure is placed a figure that resembles a dove. The entire work is painted white and each side of the prisms is decorated with red and green stripes, alluding to the Italian flag. It is made of reinforced concrete and is 11 meters high.

Wikipedia: Hombre de Paz (ES), Website

21. Monumental Flag

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The banderas monumentales are a collection of tall flagpoles containing large flags of Mexico located throughout Mexico. They are part of a program started in 1999 under President Ernesto Zedillo that is currently administered by the Secretariat of National Defense. The main feature of these monuments is a giant Mexican flag flying off a 50-meter-high (160-ft) flagpole. The size of the flag was 14.3 by 25 metres and it was flown on a pole that measured 50 metres (160 ft) high. In the time after the decree was issued, many more banderas monumentales have been installed throughout the country in various sizes. Many of the locations were chosen due to significant events in Mexican history that occurred there.

Wikipedia: Banderas monumentales (EN)

22. Biblioteca Vasconcelos

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Mexico City's Biblioteca Vasconcelos, also known as la Biblioteca Vasconcelos or la Vasconcelos and labeled by the press as the Megabiblioteca ("megalibrary"), is a library in the downtown area of Mexico City. It was dedicated to José Vasconcelos, the philosopher and former presidential candidate and former president of the National Library of Mexico. The library is spread across 38,000 square metres and had an initial planned cost of 954 million pesos. The Congress of Mexico proposed plans to reduce the budget of 2006 that included cuts for all three branches of government. National Action Party (PAN) presented an alternative budget that preserved funds for Enciclomedia and the Vasconcelos Library.

Wikipedia: Biblioteca Vasconcelos (EN), Website

23. País de Volcanes

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País de Volcanes

País de volcanes is an outdoor fountain and sculpture by the Spanish-born Mexican artist Vicente Rojo Almazán, installed outside Mexico City's Secretariat of Foreign Affairs Building and next to the Memory and Tolerance Museum, in Mexico. It is a 1,000 square meters (11,000 sq ft) artwork that features 1,034 ocher-colored pyramids standing out of the water; the artwork was made with tezontle, a type of reddish volcanic rock. The central body of the fountain contains water that flows subtly down its sides to the area with the pyramids. For Jaime Moreno Villarreal of Letras Libres, the fountain is located slightly below the square level so that the viewer can appreciate the volcanic geography.

Wikipedia: País de volcanes (EN)

24. Las Tres Gracias

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The Three Graces is a monumental sculpture made by Czechoslovakian artist Miroslav Chlupac as part of the Friendship Route, a set of 19 sculptures made by artists of various nationalities to commemorate the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico. The work was installed at the intersection of the Peripheral Ring Road and Fuentes del Pedregal Street, south of Mexico City. It was the third station on the route and represented Czechoslovakia at the exhibition. The sculpture consists of three 12.5-meter-high reinforced concrete columns with a wavy edge. Two of them are pink and the third is lilac. Its name alludes to the Charites, three deities from Greek mythology who represent beauty, joy and abundance.

Wikipedia: Las Tres Gracias (Miroslav Chlupac) (ES), Website

25. Palacio Postal

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The Palacio de Correos de México, also known as the "Correo Mayor" is located in the historic center of Mexico City, on the Eje Central near the Palacio de Bellas Artes. It was built in 1907, when the Post Office became a separate government entity. Its design and construction was the most modern at the time, including a very eclectic style which mixed several different traditions, mainly Neo-Plateresque, into a very complex design. In the 1950s, the building was modified in a way that caused stress and damage, so when the 1985 earthquake struck Mexico City, it was heavily damaged. In the 1990s, restoration work has brought the building back to original construction and appearance.

Wikipedia: Palacio de Correos de México (EN)

26. Iglesia de Jesús Nazareno

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The Church of Jesús Nazareno is a Catholic temple located in the historic center of Mexico City, in the Mayor's Office Cuauhtémoc and was built in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with modifications in the nineteenth century. It is annexed to the hospital of the same name and is characterized by house the apocalypse mural of José Clemente Orozco, the remains of Hernán Cortés and the cover of the first cathedral of Mexico which dates from the late 16th century and is one of the few construction elements of that century that are preserved in the historic center of the city. The temple was declared a historic monument on August 29, 1932.

Wikipedia: Iglesia de Jesús Nazareno (Ciudad de México) (ES)

27. Catedral Metropolitana de la Ciudad de México

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The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Assumption of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven is the cathedral church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Mexico. It is situated on top of the former Aztec sacred precinct near the Templo Mayor on the northern side of the Plaza de la Constitución (Zócalo) in the historic center of Mexico City. The cathedral was built in sections from 1573 to 1813 around the original church that was constructed soon after the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlan, eventually replacing it entirely. Spanish architect Claudio de Arciniega planned the construction, drawing inspiration from Gothic cathedrals in Spain.

Wikipedia: Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral (EN)

28. Casa Luis Barragán

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Casa Luis Barragán Francesco Bandarin / CC BY-SA 3.0 igo

Luis Barragán House and Studio, also known as Casa Luis Barragán, is the former residence of architect Luis Barragán in Miguel Hidalgo district, Mexico City. It is owned by the Fundación de Arquitectura Tapatía and the Government of the State of Jalisco. It is now a museum exhibiting Barragán's work and is also used by visiting architects. It retains the original furniture and Barragán's personal objects. These include a mostly Mexican art collection spanning the 16th to 20th century, with works by Picasso, Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, Jesús Reyes Ferreira and Miguel Covarrubias.

Wikipedia: Luis Barragán House and Studio (EN), Website

29. Fuente de la República

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The Fuente de la República is a carbon steel fountain and sculpture installed in Mexico City, Mexico. It was inaugurated on 13 December 2007 by Marcelo Ebrard, the Federal District's head of government, and was placed at the intersection of Avenida Paseo de la Reforma, Avenida Juárez and Avenida Bucareli, in the Cuauhtémoc borough. The fountain was created specifically for the celebrations of the 200th anniversary of the country's independence in 2010. It was designed by Manuel Felguérez, who also designed the Puerta 1808 sculpture found in front of it.

Wikipedia: Fuente de la República (EN)

30. Museo Nacional de la Estampa

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The Museo de la Estampa is a museum in Mexico City, dedicated to the history, preservation and promotion of Mexican graphic arts. The word “estampa” means works in the various printmaking techniques which have the quality of being reproducible and include seals, woodcuts, lithography and others. The museum was created in 1986 and located in a 19th-century Neoclassical building located in the Plaza de Santa Veracruz in the historic center of the city. This building was remodeled both to house the museum and to conserve its original look.

Wikipedia: Museo Nacional de la Estampa (EN)

31. Zona arqueológica de Mixcoac

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Zona arqueológica de Mixcoac

Mixcoac from Nahuatl means "viper in the cloud" is an archaeological zone belonging to the Mexica (Aztec) culture. It was on the shores of Lake Texcoco and in its final stage was under the rule of Tenochtitlan. With the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors, the settlement was practically destroyed to its foundations, which are the only thing that survives of the architecture of the place and can be appreciated today in what is today the San Pedro de los Pinos neighborhood, on the corner of San Antonio avenue and Periférico, in Mexico City.

Wikipedia: Mixcoac (archaeological site) (EN)

32. Basílica de San José y Nuestra Señora del Sagrado Corazón

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The Basilica of San José and Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, is a Catholic temple located in the San Juan neighborhood of the Historic Center of Mexico City in the Mayor's Office Cuauhtémoc. It was built at the end of the 18th century and rebuilt in the mid -nineteenth century. His employer party is celebrated on March 19. It is characterized by being one of the few colonial constructions that are preserved in the San Juan neighborhood and for holding the title of Minor Basilica. It was declared a historic monument on February 9, 1931,

Wikipedia: Basílica de San José y Nuestra Señora del Sagrado Corazón (ES)

33. Teatro Blanquita

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Teatro Blanquita No se ha podido leer automáticamente información sobre el autor; se asume que es JEDIKNIGHT1970 (según los derechos de autor reclamados). / CC BY 2.5

The Teatro Blanquita, also called El Blanquita, was a theater in Mexico City inaugurated on August 27, 1960 and located at number 16 of the Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas at the height of the Historic Center of Mexico City. It was inaugurated at the initiative of the writer and theatrical entrepreneur Margo Su and her husband Félix Cervantes. Popular plays and concerts were presented on its stage. In 2010 it was one of the five most visited in the Mexican capital. Blanca Eva Cervantes was a first cousin of Félix Cervantes.

Wikipedia: Teatro Blanquita (ES)

34. Kiosco morisco

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The Morisco Kiosk is a kiosk structure in Colonia Santa María la Ribera in Mexico City, Mexico. It is situated in the Alameda Park in the center of the Colonia neighborhood, at the intersection of Dr. Atl and Salvador Miron Streets, near Metro Buenavista. The kiosk is built in the neo-Mudejar architectural style that was prevailing in Spain in the 19th century. It is completely made of wrought iron with a glass cupola dome at the top. The kiosk is made of panels that can be disassembled and moved if needed.

Wikipedia: Morisco Kiosk (EN)

35. Monumento Alvaro Obregón

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Monumento Alvaro Obregón

El Parque de la Bombilla is a public park located in the neighborhood of San Ángel, Álvaro Obregón district, south of Mexico City. The park and the monument memorialize revolutionary general and former president of the republic (1920-1924) and in 1928 president-elect, Álvaro Obregón, who was assassinated in 1928 while dining at the restaurant "La Bombilla", now the site of the monument. The monument complex opened on July 17, 1935, the seventh anniversary of the assassination by José de León Toral.

Wikipedia: Parque de la Bombilla (Mexico City) (EN)

36. Acueducto de Chapultepec

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The Chapultepec aqueduct was built to provide potable water to Tenochtitlan, now known as Mexico City. Tenochtitlan was the capital of the Triple Aztec Alliance empire. This fresh water was transported from the Chapultepec springs. Two aqueducts following the same route from the springs were built by the Aztecs during the 15th century, the first destroyed by flooding and the second by the Spanish. After the Spanish conquest a colonial aqueduct was built, the ruins of which are located near Metro Sevilla.

Wikipedia: Chapultepec aqueduct (EN)

37. Museo de la Charrería

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The Museo de Charrería or Charrería Museum is located in the historic center of Mexico City on Izazaga Street, in an old monastery which was dedicated to the Virgin of Montserrat. The monastery closed in 1821 and the building deteriorated significantly, until it was decided to rehabilitate it as a tourist attraction. The purpose of the museum is to preserve and promote the sport and tradition of the charreada with both the museum's permanent display of art and handicrafts as well as outreach programs.

Wikipedia: Museo de Charrería (EN)

38. Palacio de Iturbide

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The Palace of Iturbide is a large palatial residence located in the historic center of Mexico City at Madero Street #17. It was built by the Count of San Mateo Valparaíso as a wedding gift for his daughter. It gained the name “Palace of Iturbide” because Agustín de Iturbide lived there and accepted the crown of the First Mexican Empire at the palace after independence from Spain. Today, the restored building houses the Fomento Cultural Banamex; it has been renamed the Palacio de Cultura Banamex.

Wikipedia: Palace of Iturbide (EN)

39. MODO - Museo del Objeto del Objeto

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The Museo del Objeto, or MODO, is a museum in Mexico City and the first museum in Mexico dedicated to design and communications. It was opened in 2010 based on a collection of commercial packaging, advertising, graphic arts, common devices and many other objects dating back to 1810 collected by Bruno Newman over more than 40 years. The museum is dedicated to the preservation of its collection of more than 30,000 items from two centuries and to the research in the history of design and communications.

Wikipedia: Museo del Objeto del Objeto (EN), Website

40. Universum Museo de la Ciencias

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Universum is Mexico's primary museum dedicated to promoting science and technology to the public as well as support the university's science missions. It was opened in 1992 at the Ciudad Universitaria in Mexico City. Today it has thirteen halls divided by theme dedicated to various permanent exhibitions. It has worked with outside public and private entities to develop both permanent and temporary exhibitions and has worked to develop other science museums in other areas of the country.

Wikipedia: Universum (UNAM) (EN)

41. Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe El Buen Tono

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The Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe, known as the Church of the Good Tone, is a temple located in the San Juan neighborhood of the Historic Center of Mexico City in the Cuauhtémoc Mayor's Office. It was built at the beginning of the 20th century. His patron saint's feast day is celebrated on December 12. It is characterized by being the only temple in the country that is referred to by the name of a manufacturing establishment, as well as by its eclectic style of French inspiration.

Wikipedia: Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe (Ciudad de México) (ES)

42. Museo Nacional de San Carlos

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Museo Nacional de San CarlosDavid Moran from Brooklyn / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Museo Nacional de San Carlos is a Mexican national art museum devoted to European art, located in the Cuauhtémoc borough in Mexico City. The museum is housed in the Palace of the Count of Buenavista, a neoclassical building at Puente de Alvarado No. 50, Colonia Tabacalera, Mexico City. It contains works by Lucas Cranach the Elder, Parmigianino, Frans Hals, Anthony van Dyck, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Auguste Rodin and other well-known European painters and sculptors.

Wikipedia: Museo Nacional de San Carlos (EN)

43. Torre de los Vientos

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Torre de los Vientos is a monumental sculpture made by Uruguayan artist Gonzalo Fonseca as part of the Friendship Route, a set of 19 sculptures made by artists of various nationalities to commemorate the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico. The work was installed at the intersection of the Peripheral Ring Road and Zacatépetl Street, next to the Perisur Shopping Center, south of Mexico City. It was the sixth station on the route and represented Uruguay at the exhibition.

Wikipedia: Torre de los Vientos (escultura) (ES), Website

44. Jumex Museum

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Colección Jumex is a private art collection owned by Eugenio López Alonso. It includes around 2,800 works by Damien Hirst, Andy Warhol, Gabriel Orozco, Cy Twombly, Jeff Koons, Marcel Duchamp, Andreas Gursky, Darren Almond, Tacita Dean, Olafur Eliasson, Martin Kippenberger, Carl Hopgood, Bruce Nauman, David Ostrowski, Francis Alÿs, Urs Fischer, Gego, Donald Judd, Ed Ruscha, Nancy Rubins, Richard Prince, Stefan Brüggemann, and Martin Creed.

Wikipedia: Colección Jumex (EN), Website

45. Casa del Lago UNAM

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Casa del Lago was instituted in 1959 as the first off-campus Cultural Center of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. It is characterized by its extraordinary ability to promote the cultural and generational encounter between the vanguard and tradition. It was established with Juan José Arreola as its founding director and is located in the Woods of Chapultepec, a traditional Sunday walk area for the inhabitants of the capital.

Wikipedia: Casa del Lago Juan José Arreola (EN), Website

46. Iglesia de la Profesa

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The Church of San Felipe Neri, commonly known as "La Profesa", is a Roman Catholic parish church that was established by the Society of Jesus late in the 16th century as the church of a community of professed Jesuits. The church is considered to be an important transitional work between the more sober or moderate Baroque style of the 17th century and the extremely decorated manifestations of the Baroque of the 18th century in Mexico.

Wikipedia: Church of San Felipe Neri "La Profesa" (EN)

47. El Ancla

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The Anchor is a monumental sculpture made by the Swiss artist Willi Gutmann as part of the Friendship Route, a set of 19 sculptures made by artists of various nationalities to commemorate the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico. The work was installed at the intersection of the Peripheral Ring Road and Luis Cabrera Avenue, south of Mexico City. It was the second station on the route and represented Switzerland at the exhibition.

Wikipedia: El Ancla (escultura) (ES), Website

48. Señales

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Signals is a monumental sculpture made by Mexican artist Ángela Gurría to commemorate the 1968 Olympic Games. The work was installed in the roundabout of San Jerónimo in Mexico City and was the first station on the Route of Friendship, a set of 19 sculptures made by artists of various nationalities to celebrate the Olympic Games. The work of Ángela Gurría was one of the three who represented Mexico in the exhibition.

Wikipedia: Señales (estatua) (ES), Website

49. El Sol Bípedo

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The Bípedo Sun is a monumental sculpture conducted by the Hungarian artist Pierre Szekely as part of the friendship route, a set of 19 sculptures made by artists of various nationalities to commemorate the 1968 Olympic Games. The work is installed at the intersection of the peripheral ring with boulevard de la Luz, south of Mexico City. It was the fifth station of the route and represented Hungary in the exhibition.

Wikipedia: El Sol Bípedo (ES), Website

50. Island of the Dolls

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The Island of the Dolls is a chinampa of the Laguna de Tequila located in the channels of Xochimilco, south of the center of Mexico City, Mexico. It is notable for the multitude of dolls of various styles and colors that can be found throughout the island. Local legends surround the dolls and the island's reclusive former owner, Don Julián Santana Barrera, making the island a popular destination for dark tourism.

Wikipedia: The Island of the Dolls (EN)

51. Museo Nacional de Antropología

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Museo Nacional de Antropología kornemuz / CC BY-SA 3.0

The National Museum of Anthropology is a national museum of Mexico. It is the largest and most visited museum in Mexico. Located in the area between Paseo de la Reforma and Mahatma Gandhi Street within Chapultepec Park in Mexico City, the museum contains significant archaeological and anthropological artifacts from Mexico's pre-Columbian heritage, such as the Stone of the Sun and the Aztec Xochipilli statue.

Wikipedia: National Museum of Anthropology (Mexico) (EN), Website

52. Biblioteca de México José Vasconcelos

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The Citadel is a building in Mexico City was built between 1793 and 1807 by the Spanish architect José Antonio González Velázquez with the purpose of hosting the Royal Factory of Pure and Cigars of Mexico. Currently in the building is the Mexico Library "José Vasconcelos" and the center of the image and the headquarters of the General Directorate of Libraries of the Ministry of Culture of the country.

Wikipedia: La Ciudadela (ciudad de México) (ES), Website

53. Disco Solar

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Disco Solar is a monumental sculpture made by Belgian artist Jacques Moeschal as part of the Friendship Route, a set of 19 sculptures made by artists of various nationalities to commemorate the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico. The work was installed in the Archaeological Zone of Cuicuilco, south of Mexico City. It was the eighth station on the route and represented Belgium at the exhibition.

Wikipedia: Disco Solar (escultura) (ES), Website

54. Cárcamo de Dolores

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The Cárcamo de Dolores is a hydraulic structure located on the Second Section of Chapultepec Park, in Mexico City, comprising the building designed by architect Ricardo Rivas, inside the originally underwater mural Agua, el origen de la vida of Mexican muralist Diego Rivera, the art installation Cámara Lambdoma by Ariel Guzik, and in outside, the Tlaloc Fountain, also of Rivera.

Wikipedia: Cárcamo de Dolores (EN)

55. El Caballito

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The equestrian statue of Charles IV of Spain is a bronze sculpture cast by Manuel Tolsá built between 1796 and 1803 in Mexico City, Mexico in honour of King Charles IV of Spain, then the last ruler of the New Spain. This statue has been displayed in different points of the city and is considered one of the finest achievements of Mr. Tolsá. It now resides in Plaza Manuel Tolsá.

Wikipedia: Equestrian statue of Charles IV of Spain (EN)

56. Six Flags Mexico

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Six Flags México is a amusement park located in the Tlalpan forest and borough, on the southern edge of Mexico City, Mexico. It is owned and operated by Six Flags, and is the most visited theme park in Latin America with 2.8 million annual visitors. It was previously known as Reino Aventura when it was Mexican-owned and featured the orca whale Keiko as its principal attraction.

Wikipedia: Six Flags México (EN), Website

57. Casa de Carranza

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Casa de Carranza

The Casa de Carranza Museum is located in Colonia Cuauhtémoc in Mexico City, Mexico. The museum is named after President Venustiano Carranza who inhabited it for the last six months of his life and narrates the history of the Mexican Revolution focusing on the part related to Carranza, the causes of his confrontation with Álvaro Obregón and the betrayal of Victoriano Huerta.

Wikipedia: Museo Casa Carranza (ES)

58. Museo Nacional de la Acuarela Alfredo Guati Rojo

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The Alfredo Guati Rojo National Watercolor Museum was the first museum in the world dedicated specifically to watercolor painting. It is located in the Coyoacán borough of Mexico City, in a former private house which was donated to the museum by the city government. Due to the public health emergency, as of March 2022 the museum was still closed to casual public visits.

Wikipedia: Alfredo Guati Rojo National Watercolor Museum (EN), Website

59. El Sereno

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El Sereno is a statue installed at Glorieta de los Insurgentes, a roundabout in Avenida de los Insurgentes, in Cuauhtémoc, Mexico City. The statue was designed by Víctor Manuel Villareal and was placed in 1992. The statue features a watchman, formerly a law enforcement position. When it was unveiled, El Sereno had a lamp and a plaque that were removed at some point.

Wikipedia: El Sereno (sculpture) (EN)

60. Monumento a Cuauhtémoc

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The Monument to Cuauhtémoc is an 1887 monument dedicated to the last Mexica ruler (tlatoani) of Tenochtitlan Cuauhtémoc, located at the intersection of Avenida de los Insurgentes and Paseo de la Reforma in Mexico City. It is the work of Francisco Jiménez and Miguel Noreña in the "neoindigenismo", and was proposed to promote the new government of Porfirio Díaz.

Wikipedia: Monument to Cuauhtémoc (EN)

61. Estadio Azteca

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Estadio Azteca is a football stadium located in Mexico City. It is the official home of football team Club América, as well as the Mexico national team. The stadium sits at an altitude of 2,200 m above sea level. With a capacity of 87,523, it is the largest stadium in Latin America and the eighth-largest association football stadium in the world.

Wikipedia: Estadio Azteca (EN)

62. Parish of the Holy Child of Peace

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The Parish of the Holy Child of Peace is a historic church located near Paseo de la Reforma and Zona Rosa in Cuauhtémoc, Mexico City, Mexico. It is also known as Praga Parish because it is found on Praga 11 Street. The church is known for its German neogothic architecture and was recognized as a temple by the Secretariat of the Interior in 1931.

Wikipedia: Parish of the Holy Child of Peace (EN), Website

63. Museo de arte Carrillo Gil

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Museo de arte Carrillo Gil Gary Denness / CC BY 2.0

The Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil is a museum in Mexico City. It bears the name of the collector Álvar Carrillo Gil and focuses mainly on the dissemination of his collection, which consists mainly of works by José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera. The museum also features contemporary and experimental art by young artists.

Wikipedia: Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil (ES)

64. Complejo Cultural Los Pinos

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Los Pinos was the official residence and office of the President of Mexico from 1934 to 2018. Located in the Bosque de Chapultepec in central Mexico City, it became the presidential seat in 1934, when Gen. Lázaro Cárdenas became the first president to live there. The term Los Pinos became a metonym for the Presidency of Mexico.

Wikipedia: Los Pinos (EN), Website

65. Abraham Lincoln: The Man

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Abraham Lincoln: The Man is a larger-than-life size 12-foot (3.7 m) bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States. The original statue is in Lincoln Park in Chicago, and later re-castings of the statue have been given as diplomatic gifts from the United States to the United Kingdom, and to Mexico.

Wikipedia: Abraham Lincoln: The Man (EN)

66. Parque Lira

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Parque Lira is a public park in the Tacubaya district of Mexico City, once a separate town from Mexico City. It is located on the 18th century estate of Vicente Lira. It is entered by a monumental archway designed by Italian architect Francesco Saverio Cavallari, an Italian architect who was active in Mexico 1857–1864.

Wikipedia: Parque Lira (EN)

67. Glorieta de los Insurgentes

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Glorieta de Insurgentes is a large roundabout in Mexico City formed at the intersection of Avenida Chapultepec and Avenida de los Insurgentes. Oaxaca Avenue connects to it heading southwest to Fuente de Cibeles. The smaller street Génova connects to Zona Rosa. Jalapa connects via one-way traffic from Colonia Roma.

Wikipedia: Glorieta de los Insurgentes (EN)

68. Museo Casa de Leon Trotsky

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The Leon Trotsky House Museum, Trotsky Museum, or Trotsky House Museum, is a museum honoring Leon Trotsky and an organization that works to promote political asylum, located in the Coyoacán neighborhood of Mexico City. Its official name is Instituto del Derecho de Asilo - Museo Casa de León Trotsky.

Wikipedia: Leon Trotsky House Museum (EN), Website

69. Museo del Cine

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Museo del Cine

The National Cineteca is an institution dedicated to the preservation, cataloging, exhibition and dissemination of cinema in Mexico. It is dependent on the Ministry of Culture and is part of the International Film Federation (FIAF). Its director is, since 2013, the filmmaker Alejandro Pelayo Rangel.

Wikipedia: Cineteca Nacional (ES)

70. Museo Memoria y Tolerancia

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The Museum of Memory and Tolerance is a museum in Mexico City. It opened its doors on October 18, 2010 and seeks to spread respect for diversity and tolerance based on historical remembrance through the use of genocide exhibitions and multimedia presentations of the values in favor of tolerance.

Wikipedia: Museo Memoria y Tolerancia (México) (ES), Website

71. Ché Guevara y Fidel Castro

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Ché Guevara y Fidel Castro

Ernesto "Che" Guevara was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist. A major figure of the Cuban Revolution, his stylized visage has become a ubiquitous countercultural symbol of rebellion and global insignia in popular culture.

Wikipedia: Che Guevara (EN)

72. Teatro Fru-fru

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The Teatro Fru (Fru Theater) is a theater in Mexico City. It was inaugurated on January 1, 1899 under the name Teatro Renacimiento. In 1973 it was re-inaugurated with its current name. It is located at number 24 in the Donceles Street, in the Centro Histórico de la Ciudad de México

Wikipedia: Teatro Fru Fru (EN)

73. Museo Numismático Nacional

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The National Numismatic Museum is part of the Mexican Mint, where since the seventeenth century the industrial process of separating the gold that was mixed with silver from the mines was carried out, this enclosure is located in the Historic Center, in the old Casa del Apartado.

Wikipedia: Museo Numismático Nacional (México) (ES)

74. Museo Rufino Tamayo

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Museo Rufino Tamayo is a public contemporary art museum located in Mexico City's Chapultepec Park, that produces contemporary art exhibitions, using its collection of modern and contemporary art, as well as artworks from the collection of its founder, the artist Rufino Tamayo.

Wikipedia: Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City (EN)

75. Santa Vera Cruz

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The Santa Veracruz Monastery in the historic center of Mexico City is one of the oldest religious establishments in Mexico City and was the third most important church in the area in the 16th century. It was established by a religious brotherhood founded by Hernán Cortés.

Wikipedia: Santa Veracruz Monastery, Mexico City (EN)

76. Museo Templo Mayor

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The Templo Mayor Museum is located in the Historic Center of Mexico City, Mexico. The objective of the museum is to publicize the findings found in the framework of the on-site research that is being carried out in the archaeological zone of the Templo Mayor of the Mexica.

Wikipedia: Museo del Templo Mayor (ES)

77. Monumento a Colón

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The Monument to Christopher Columbus is a statue by French sculptor Charles Cordier first dedicated in 1877. It was originally located on a major traffic roundabout along Mexico City's Paseo de la Reforma, and was removed on 10 October 2020 in advance of protests.

Wikipedia: Monument to Christopher Columbus (Charles Cordier) (EN)

78. Parque Lincoln

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Parque Lincoln

Parque Lincoln is a city park in Mexico City, Mexico in the Polanco neighborhood. The park memorializes US President Abraham Lincoln and has a copy of Abraham Lincoln: The Man, also known as Standing Lincoln. The park also has a statue of Martin Luther King Jr.

Wikipedia: Parque Lincoln (EN)

79. Museo del Tequila y el Mezcal

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Museo del Tequila y el MezcalAlejandroLinaresGarcia; cropped by Beyond My Ken 04:02, 2 October 2012 (UTC) / CC BY-SA 4.0

The Museum of Tequila and Mezcal is a cultural venue that exhibits the most representative of the culture of tequila and mezcal through exhibitions, conferences, concerts, gastronomy and other cultural manifestations located in Plaza Garibaldi in Mexico City.

Wikipedia: Museo del Tequila y el Mezcal (ES)

80. Museo Universitario del Chopo

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The Museo Universitario del Chopo is located at Doctor Enrique González Martínez Street in the Colonia Santa María la Ribera of Mexico City. It has collections in contemporary art, and is part of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).

Wikipedia: Museo Universitario del Chopo (EN), Website

81. Capilla de San Juan Bautista

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The Chapel of San Juan Bautista is a small Catholic church located in the San Juan neighborhood of the Xochimilco Mayor's Office of Mexico City and was built in the mid-eighteenth century. It was declared a historical monument on June 14, 1932.

Wikipedia: Capilla de San Juan Bautista (Xochimilco) (ES)

82. Museo del Estanquillo

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The Museo del Estanquillo is located in the Historic Center of Mexico City, Mexico. The museum houses the personal collection of the writer Carlos Monsivais, encompassing paintings, photography, toys, albums, calendars, advertising and books.

Wikipedia: Museo del Estanquillo (EN)

83. Papalote•Museo del Niño

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Papalote•Museo del Niño Jaime Navarro / CC BY-SA 4.0

The museum Papalote Museo del Niño is located in Mexico City Bosques de Chapultepec. The museum is focused in learning, communication and working together through interactive expositions of science, technology and art for children.

Wikipedia: Papalote Museo del Niño (EN), Website

84. Teatro de la Ciudad Esperanza Iris

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The Teatro de la Ciudad was built as the Teatro Esperanza Iris in 1918 and is now one of Mexico City’s public venues for cultural events. The theater is located in the historic center of Mexico City on Donceles Street 36.

Wikipedia: Teatro de la Ciudad (EN), Website

85. Teatro Metropólitan

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Teatro Metropólitan No machine-readable author provided. JEDIKNIGHT1970 assumed (based on copyright claims). / CC BY-SA 2.5

The Teatro Metropólitan is a theater in Mexico City. It was previously known as the Cine Metropólitan, and was built as a movie palace. The architect was Pedro Gorozpe E. with interior decorations by Aurelio G. Mendoza.

Wikipedia: Teatro Metropólitan (EN)

86. Monumento a la Raza

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Monumento a la Raza No machine-readable author provided. JEDIKNIGHT1970 assumed (based on copyright claims). / CC BY-SA 2.5

The Monumento a la Raza is a 50 meters (160 ft) high pyramid in northern Mexico City. It is located in the intersection of Avenida de los Insurgentes, Circuito Interior and Calzada Vallejo, in the Cuauhtémoc borough.

Wikipedia: Monumento a la Raza (Mexico City) (EN)

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Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.