100 Sights in Kyoto, Japan (with Map and Images)

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Welcome to your journey through the most beautiful sights in Kyoto, Japan! Whether you want to discover the city's historical treasures or experience its modern highlights, you'll find everything your heart desires here. Be inspired by our selection and plan your unforgettable adventure in Kyoto. Dive into the diversity of this fascinating city and discover everything it has to offer.

Sightseeing Tours in KyotoActivities in Kyoto

1. TOEI Kyoto Studio Park

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Toei Kyoto Studio Park is a theme park and film set modeled after the Edo period located in Kyoto, Japan that opened its doors in 1975. It is situated in Toei Company's Kyoto Studio where movies have been produced.

Wikipedia: Toei Kyoto Studio Park (EN), Website

2. Kyoto railway museum

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Kyoto railway museumCheng-en Cheng from Taipei City, Taiwan / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Kyoto Railway Museum is a railway museum in Shimogyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan. The original Umekoji Steam Locomotive Museum opened in 1972, but was expanded and modernized in 2016, becoming the Kyoto Railway Museum.

Wikipedia: Kyoto Railway Museum (EN), Website

3. Shimogamo Shrine

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Shimogamo Shrine is an important Shinto sanctuary in the Shimogamo district of Kyoto city's Sakyō ward. Its formal name is Kamo-mioya Shrine . It is one of the oldest Shinto shrines in Japan and is one of the seventeen Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which have been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. The term Kamo-jinja in Japanese is a general reference to Shimogamo Shrine and Kamigamo Shrine, the traditionally linked Kamo shrines of Kyoto; Shimogamo is the older of the pair, being believed to be 100 years older than Kamigamo, and dating to the 6th century, centuries before Kyoto became the capital of Japan. The Kamo-jinja serve the function of protecting Kyoto from malign influences.

Wikipedia: Shimogamo Shrine (EN), Website

4. Daitoku-ji

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Daitoku-ji is a Buddhist temple, one of fourteen autonomous branches of the Rinzai school of Japanese Zen. It is located in Kita-ku, Kyoto, Japan. The "mountain name" (sangō) by which it is known is Ryūhōzan (龍宝山). The Daitoku-ji temple complex today covers more than 23 hectares.

Wikipedia: Daitoku-ji (EN)

5. Mikane Shrine

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Mikane Shrine

Mikanejinja is a shrine located in Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto. It is a shrine decorated with golden torii gates, and as a shrine related to metal, especially money, a large number of ginkgo-shaped ema are dedicated to wish for success in asset management and securities trading, victory in horse races, bicycle races, and lottery wins. Originally, it dedicates architectural molds, architectural designs, shipbuilding, and other molds related to construction. The word "gold" in Gokin means metal.

Wikipedia: 御金神社 (JA), Website

6. Seiganji

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Seiganji コンピュータが読み取れる情報は提供されていませんが、Volfgangだと推定されます(著作権の主張に基づく) / CC BY-SA 3.0

Seiganji Temple is the main temple of the Nishiyama Fukakusa sect of the Jodo sect located in Shinkyogoku-dori, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Fukakusa. The honzon is Amitabha. The main hall also enshrines the eleven-sided Guanyin of the 15th of the 33 places of the New West Kingdom, the 33rd Guanyin Shrine of Luoyang, and the 2nd temple of the main temple.

Wikipedia: 誓願寺 (JA), Website

7. Yasaka Shrine

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Yasaka Shrine , once called Gion Shrine , is a Shinto shrine in the Gion District of Kyoto, Japan. Situated at the east end of Shijō-dōri, the shrine includes several buildings, including gates, a main hall and a stage. The Yasaka shrine is dedicated to Susanoo in the tradition of the Gion faith as its chief kami, with his consort Kushinadahime on the east, and eight offspring deities on the west. The yahashira no mikogami include Yashimajinumi no kami, Itakeru no kami, Ōyatsuhime no kami, Tsumatsuhime no kami, Ōtoshi no kami, Ukanomitama no kami, Ōyatsuhiko no kami, and Suseribime no mikoto.

Wikipedia: Yasaka Shrine (EN)

8. Chion-in

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Chion-in

Chion-in Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto, Japan is the headquarters of the Jōdo-shū founded by Hōnen (1133–1212), who proclaimed that sentient beings are reborn in Amida Buddha's Western Paradise by reciting the nembutsu, Amida Buddha's name.

Wikipedia: Chion-in (EN)

9. Maruyama Park

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Maruyama Park is a park in Kyoto, Japan. It is noted as the main center for cherry blossom viewing in Kyoto, and can get extremely crowded at that time of year (April). The park's star attraction is a weeping cherry tree (shidarezakura) which becomes lit up at night. It also becomes busy in the New Year's Eve Festivals.

Wikipedia: Maruyama Park (EN)

10. Nishiki Market

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Nishiki Market is a marketplace in downtown Kyoto, located on the east end of Nishikikōji Street, one block north and parallel to Shijō Street and west of Teramachi Street . Rich with history and tradition, the market is renowned as the place to obtain many of Kyoto's famous foods and goods.

Wikipedia: Nishiki Market (EN)

11. Kyoto Imperial Palace

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The Kyōto Imperial Palace is the former palace of the Emperor of Japan, located in Kamigyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan. Since the Meiji Restoration in 1869, the Emperors have resided at the Tokyo Imperial Palace, while the preservation of the Kyoto Imperial Palace was ordered in 1877. Today, the grounds are open to the public, and the Imperial Household Agency hosts public tours of the buildings several times a day.

Wikipedia: Kyoto Imperial Palace (EN), Website

12. Kan'non bosatsu

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Kan'non bosatsu

Guanyin is a Bodhisattva associated with compassion. Guanyin is a common Chinese name for Avalokiteśvara in Chinese Buddhism and has been appropriated by other Eastern religions, including Shinto, Hinduism, Taoism and Chinese folk religion. She was first given the appellation "Goddess of Mercy" or "Mercy Goddess" by Jesuit missionaries in China. Guanyin is short for Guanshiyin, which means "[The One Who] Perceives the Sounds of the World." On the 19th day of the sixth lunar month, Guanyin's attainment of Buddhahood is celebrated.

Wikipedia: Guanyin (EN)

13. Kinkaku-ji (Golden Pavilion Temple)

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Kinkaku-ji , officially named Rokuon-ji , is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the most popular buildings in Kyoto, attracting many visitors annually. It is designated as a National Special Historic Site, a National Special Landscape and is one of 17 locations making up the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which are World Heritage Sites.

Wikipedia: Kinkaku-ji (EN), Website

14. Ryōan-ji

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Ryōan-ji is a Zen temple located in northwest Kyoto, Japan. It belongs to the Myōshin-ji school of the Rinzai branch of Zen Buddhism. The Ryōan-ji garden is considered one of the finest surviving examples of kare-sansui, a refined type of Japanese Zen temple garden design generally featuring distinctive larger rock formations arranged amidst a sweep of smooth pebbles raked into linear patterns that facilitate meditation. The temple and its gardens are listed as one of the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto, and as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Wikipedia: Ryōan-ji (EN), Url

15. D51-1

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D51-1 Alt_winmaerik / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Class D51 (D51形) is a type of 2-8-2 steam locomotive built by the Japanese Government Railways (JGR), the Japanese National Railways (JNR), and Kawasaki Heavy Industries Rolling Stock Company, Kisha Seizo, Hitachi, Nippon Sharyo, Mitsubishi, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries from 1936 to 1945 and 1950 to 1951. 174 units are in preservation in Japan, including five operational examples. A further 13 are preserved in Russia and Taiwan, bringing the total number of preserved units to 187.

Wikipedia: JNR Class D51 (EN)

16. 昭憲皇太后陵

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昭憲皇太后陵

Masako Ichijō , who adopted the imperial given name Haruko (美子) in 1867 and was posthumously honoured as Empress Dowager Shōken , was the wife of Emperor Meiji of Japan. She was one of the founders of the Japanese Red Cross Society, whose charity work was known throughout the First Sino-Japanese War.

Wikipedia: Empress Shōken (EN)

17. Okuni Statue

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Okuni Statue

Izumo no Okuni was a Japanese entertainer and shrine maiden who is believed to have invented the theatrical art form of kabuki. She is thought to have begun performing her new art style of kabuki theatre in the dry riverbed of the Kamo River in Kyoto. Okuni's troupe quickly gained immense popularity, and were known for their performers, who were often lower-class women Okuni had recruited to act in her all-female theatre group.

Wikipedia: Izumo no Okuni (EN)

18. Nijō Castle

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Nijō Castle

Nijō Castle is a flatland castle in Kyoto, Japan. The castle consists of two concentric rings (Kuruwa) of fortifications, the Ninomaru Palace, the ruins of the Honmaru Palace, various support buildings and several gardens. The surface area of the castle is 275,000 square metres, of which 8,000 square metres (86,000 sq ft) is occupied by buildings.

Wikipedia: Nijō Castle (EN), Website

19. Katsura Imperial Villa

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The Katsura Imperial Villa , or Katsura Detached Palace, is an Imperial residence with associated gardens and outbuildings in the western suburbs of Kyoto, Japan. Located on the western bank of the Katsura River in Katsura, Nishikyō-ku, the Villa is 8km distant from the main Kyoto Imperial Palace. The villa and gardens are nationally recognized as an Important Cultural Property of Japan.

Wikipedia: Katsura Imperial Villa (EN), Website

20. Saihoji Temple

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Saihō-ji (西芳寺) is a Rinzai Zen Buddhist temple in Matsuo, Nishikyō Ward, Kyoto, Japan. The temple, which is famed for its moss garden, is commonly referred to as "Koke-dera" (苔寺), meaning "moss temple", while the formal name is "Kōinzan Saihō-ji" (洪隠山西芳寺). The temple, primarily constructed to honor Amitābha, was founded by Gyōki and later restored by Musō Soseki. In 1994, Saihō-ji was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto". Over 120 types of moss are present in the two-tiered garden, resembling a beautiful green carpet with many subtle shades.

Wikipedia: Saihō-ji (Kyoto) (EN), Website

21. Heian Shrine

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Heian Shrine KENPEI / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Heian-jingu Shrine is a Shinto shrine located in Sakyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan. The Shrine is ranked as a Beppyō Jinja (別表神社) by the Association of Shinto Shrines. It is listed as an important cultural property of Japan.

Wikipedia: Heian Shrine (EN), Website

22. Tenryū Temple

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Tenryū-ji (天龍寺), formally known as Tenryū Shiseizen-ji (天龍資聖禅寺), is the head temple of the Tenryū-ji branch of the Rinzai sect of Zen Buddhism, located in Susukinobaba-chō, Ukyō Ward, Kyoto, Japan. The temple was founded by Ashikaga Takauji in 1339, primarily to venerate Gautama Buddha, and its first chief priest was Musō Soseki. Construction was completed in 1345. As a temple related to both the Ashikaga family and Emperor Go-Daigo, the temple is held in high esteem, and is ranked number one among Kyoto's so-called Five Mountains. In 1994, it was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, as part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto".

Wikipedia: Tenryū-ji (EN), Website

23. Zuishin Temple

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Zuishin-in (隨心院) is a temple of the Shingon sect of Zentsuji sect located in Ono-goreicho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Ushihide. The main Buddha is the Bodhisattva of the Nyorin Kansei-on. Kaizan is a monk named Ningai, who is known as the founder of Ono-ryu. The temple crest is Kujo wisteria. The Ono district, where this temple is located, is considered to be the base of the Ono clan, and Soshin-in Temple is also known as a temple related to Ono-Komachi. It tells the pale love story of Ono Komachi and Major General Fukakusa.

Wikipedia: 随心院 (JA), Website

24. 聖護院

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Shogoin is the main temple of the Motoyama Shugenshu sect located in Nakamachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. There is no mountain number. The honzon is Fudo Myo. The opening of the mountain is an increase. It is also called the ruins of the Shogoin Gate. It was also called Jinlinfu. It used to be one of the ruins of the Tendai Sect Temple Gate Sect (Tendai Temple Gate Sect).

Wikipedia: 聖護院 (JA)

25. Nanzen-ji

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Nanzen-ji , or Zuiryusan Nanzen-ji, formerly Zenrin-ji , is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. Emperor Kameyama established it in 1291 on the site of his previous detached palace. It is also the headquarters of the Nanzen-ji branch of Rinzai Zen. The precincts of Nanzen-ji are a nationally designated Historic Site and the Hōjō gardens a Place of Scenic Beauty. The temple was destroyed in a fire in 1895 and rebuilt in 1909.

Wikipedia: Nanzen-ji (EN)

26. C62-1

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C62-1 No machine-readable author provided. NekoJaNekoJa~commonswiki assumed (based on copyright claims). / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Class C62 (C62形) is a type of 4-6-4 steam locomotive designed by Hideo Shima and built by the Japanese National Railways (JNR). The "C" classification indicates three sets of driving wheels. The C62 was rebuilt with the boilers of older Class D52 2-8-2 locomotives.

Wikipedia: JNR Class C62 (EN)

27. 建仁寺

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Kennin-ji is a historic Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan, and head temple of its associated branch of Rinzai Buddhism. It is considered to be one of the so-called Kyoto Gozan or "five most important Zen temples of Kyoto".

Wikipedia: Kennin-ji (EN), Website

28. Myōshinji Temple

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Myōshinji Temple

Myōshin-ji is a temple complex in Kyoto, Japan, which serves as the head temple of the associated branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism. The Myōshin-ji School is by far the largest school in Rinzai Zen, approximately as big as the other thirteen branches combined: it contains within it about 3,400 temples throughout Japan, together with a handful overseas, of the approximately six thousand total Rinzai temples, and also has nineteen associated monasteries, of the total of forty Rinzai monasteries and one nunnery.

Wikipedia: Myōshin-ji (EN)

29. Ninna temple

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Ninna-ji is the head temple of the Omuro school of the Shingon Sect of Buddhism. Located in western Kyoto, Japan, it was first founded in AD 888 by Emperor Uda, and was later reconstructed in the 17th century. It is part of the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Wikipedia: Ninna-ji (EN), Website

30. Shimo Daigo

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Shimo Daigo

Daigo-ji is a Shingon Buddhist temple in Fushimi-ku, Kyoto, Japan. Its main devotion (honzon) is Yakushi. Daigo, literally "ghee", is used figuratively to mean "crème de la crème" and is a metaphor of the most profound part of Buddhist thoughts.

Wikipedia: Daigo-ji (EN)

31. Daisen-in temple

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Daisen-in temple No machine-readable author provided. Ivanoff~commonswiki assumed (based on copyright claims). / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Daisen-in (大仙院) is a sub-temple of Daitoku-ji, a temple of the Rinzai school of Zen in Buddhism, one of the five most important Zen temples of Kyoto. The name means "The Academy of the Great Immortals." Daisen-in was founded by the Zen priest Kogaku Sōkō , and was built between 1509 and 1513. The Daisen-in is noted for its screen paintings and for its kare-sansui, or dry landscape garden.

Wikipedia: Daisen-in (EN)

32. 清浄華院

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清浄華院 PlusMinus / CC BY-SA 3.0

Shojo-in is a temple of the main temple of the Jodo sect located in Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto. The name is only the name of the temple, and there is no name of the mountain or temple. The honzon is a dharma superior. It is one of the seven main temples of the Jodo sect, and one of the four main temples of Kyoto of the same sect (the others are Chion-in, Hyakuban Chion-ji, and Kinsho Komyo-ji). According to the temple tradition, Ennin was founded in the Heian period at the request of Emperor Seiwa. Twenty-five Sacred Places No. 23. As of May 26, 2021 (Reiwa 3), the law owner is Mio Iida.

Wikipedia: 清浄華院 (JA)

33. Tōji-in

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Tōji-in (等持院) is a Buddhist temple of the Rinzai Tenryū sect located in Kita Ward, Kyoto, Japan, and one of two funeral temples (bodaiji) dedicated to Ashikaga Takauji, first shōgun of the Ashikaga dynasty. Its main object of worship is Shakyamuni, and its honorary sangō prefix is Mannenzan (萬年山).

Wikipedia: Tōji-in (EN)

34. Jishu Shrine

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Jishu Shrine mariemon / CC BY 3.0

Shrines called landlord shrines are broadly divided into the following. When a shrine or temple is built, a shrine is built to enshrine the landlord god of the land. It may be built as a shrine within the precincts of the shrine, or it may be located adjacent to the temple. Most of the landlord shrines adjacent to the temple were originally part of the adjacent temple (Chinshusha), but most of them became independent due to the separation of Shinto and Buddhist shrines in the Meiji era. In this case, there are also places that read "jinushi jinja". A shrine located in Higashiyama Ward, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture. It is adjacent to Kiyomizu Temple. It is particularly famous among the many landlord shrines in Japan.

Wikipedia: 地主神社 (JA)

35. Yogen-in

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Yogen-in is a temple of the Jodo Shinshu sect located in Sanjusangendo in Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Nanei. The honzon is Amitabha. It is located across the street from Sanjusangendo to the east. The name of the temple was taken from the name of Asai Nagamasa. It was originally the Tendai sect. It is known by the common names of "Blood Ceiling" and "Sodaji Temple".

Wikipedia: 養源院 (JA)

36. Sennyū-ji Temple

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Sennyū-ji (泉涌寺), formerly written as Sen-yū-ji (仙遊寺), is a Shingon Buddhist temple and head of the Sennyū-ji sect in Higashiyama-ku in Kyoto, Japan. For centuries, Sennyū-ji has been a mausoleum for noble families and members of the Imperial House of Japan. Located within the temple grounds are the official tombs of Emperor Shijō and many of the emperors who came after him.

Wikipedia: Sennyū-ji (EN)

37. 本満寺

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Honmanji Temple is a temple of the main mountain (venerable temple) of Nichiren Buddhism located in Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Guangfu Mountain (広宣流布山). The main Buddha is the Ten Realms Mandala. There are four temples.

Wikipedia: 本満寺 (JA)

38. Kousanji Temple

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Kōzan-ji (高山寺), officially Toganōsan Kōsan-ji (栂尾山高山寺), is a Buddhist temple of the Omuro sect of Shingon Buddhism in Umegahata Toganōchō, Ukyō Ward, Kyoto, Japan. Kōzan-ji is also known as Kōsan-ji and Toganō-dera. The temple was founded by the Shingon scholar and monk Myōe (1173–1232) and is renowned for its numerous national treasures and important cultural properties. The Chōjū-jinbutsu-giga, a group of ink paintings from the 12th and 13th centuries, are among the most important treasures of Kōzan-ji. The temple celebrates Biyakkōshin, Zenmyōshin and Kasuga Myōjin, as well as the temple's tutelary Shintō deity. In 1994, it was registered as part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto".

Wikipedia: Kōzan-ji (EN)

39. Ryuko-in temple

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Ryuko-in temple hiro / CC BY-SA 3.0

Ryōkoin is a temple of the Rinzai sect located in Murasakino, Kita-ku, Kyoto, Japan. It is the head of the Rinzai sect Daitokuji sect Daihonzan Daitokuji Temple. Although it has many buildings and works of art that are national treasures and important cultural properties, it is a temple that is closed to the public, does not accept any visits for sightseeing purposes, and does not hold any special exhibitions.

Wikipedia: 龍光院 (京都市北区) (JA)

40. Daikaku-ji Temple

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Daikaku-ji is a Shingon Buddhist temple in Ukyō-ku, a western ward in the city of Kyoto, Japan. The site was originally a residence of Emperor Saga, and later various emperors conducted their cloistered rule from here. The Saga Go-ryū school of ikebana has its headquarters in the temple. The artificial lake of the temple, Ōsawa Pond, is one of the oldest Japanese garden ponds to survive from the Heian period.

Wikipedia: Daikaku-ji (EN)

41. Higashi Hongan-ji Temple

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Higashi Hongan-ji (東本願寺), or, "the Eastern Monastery of the Original Vow", is one of two dominant sub-sects of Shin Buddhism in Japan and abroad, the other being Nishi Honganji. It is also the name of the head temple of the Ōtani-ha branch of Jōdo Shinshū in Kyoto, which was most recently constructed in 1895 after a fire burned down the previous temple. As with many sites in Kyoto, these two complexes have more casual names and are known affectionately in Kyoto as Onissan and Ohigashisan .

Wikipedia: Higashi Hongan-ji (EN), Website

42. 行願寺

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Gyoganji Temple is a temple of the Tendai sect located in Gyoganji Monzencho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Reiyuzan. The honzon is a thousand-handed Kannon. It is commonly known as Kodo. West Country 33 No. 19 Temple. Luoyang Thirty-Three Guanyin Sacred Ground No. 4. It is the only nunnery in the 33 places in the West Country.

Wikipedia: 行願寺 (JA)

43. Sho-koku-ji temple

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Shōkoku-ji (相国寺), formally identified as Mannen-zan Shōkoku Shōten Zenji (萬年山相國承天禅寺), is a Buddhist temple in northern Kyoto, first founded in 1382 by Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, with the existing temple complex having undergone several periods of extensive reconstruction and rebuilding in the succeeding eras.

Wikipedia: Shōkoku-ji (EN)

44. 法界寺

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Hokaiji Temple is a temple of the Shingon sect of the Daigo sect located in Hinonishidaido-cho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Toko. The honzon is Yakushi Nyorai. Kaizan is considered to be the clearest of Denkyo Daishi. It is the clan temple of the Hino family, a clan of the Fujiwara clan, and is known as Hino Yakushi or Milk Medicine Master.

Wikipedia: 法界寺 (JA)

45. C57-1

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C57-1ja:User:TC411-507 aka JobanLineE531 / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Class C57 (C57形) is a type of 4-6-2 steam locomotive built in Japan from 1937 to 1947. A total of 201 Class C57 locomotives were built and designed by Hideo Shima. Another 14 Class C57 locomotives were built for export to Taiwan in 1942 and 1953.

Wikipedia: JNR Class C57 (EN)

46. Rokudouchin-nouji

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Rokudōchinnoji Temple is a temple of the Kenninji sect of the Rinzai sect located in Komatsu-cho, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Tsubaki. The honzon is Yakushi Nyorai. It is known for the "Six Paths" from August 7 to 10, the well where Ono is said to have passed through the underworld. Commonly known as "Rokumichi Mr./Ms.". This area is said to be the "Tsuji of the Six Paths".

Wikipedia: 六道珍皇寺 (JA)

47. Myoken-ji Temple

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Myōkenji Temple is the main temple of Nichiren Buddhism located in Myokenji-maemachi, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Guashi. The main temple is the Three Treasures. There are nine temples at the top of the tower. It is also called "Shikai Chanting" and "Shijomon-ryu". At the three temples of Myokenji, Myokakuji, and Rishonji, it is called "Ryuge no Mitsugusoku". The current resident is the 68th Oikawa Nichishu Kanshu (from Motoyama Myokaku-ji Temple, Jinzan, Shrine Dharma).

Wikipedia: 妙顕寺 (京都市) (JA)

48. C56-160

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The Class C56 is a type of 2-6-0 steam locomotive built by the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) from 1935 to 1939, and later operated by Japanese National Railways (JNR). They were numbered C56 1-C56 164 a total of 164 were built from 1935 to 1939 locomotives numbered C56 1-C56 90 and C56 161-C56 164 were sent to other countries in Asia during the Second World War. The locomotives were retired in 1974. They were designed by Hideo Shima.

Wikipedia: JNR Class C56 (EN)

49. 藤森神社

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Fujimori Shrine is a shrine located in Fukakusa, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto. The former company name was Fusha. It is a god of origin in the Fukakusa district of Fushimi Ward and the Honmachi and Fukuine districts of Higashiyama Ward.

Wikipedia: 藤森神社 (JA)

50. Bishamondō

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Bishamondo is a temple of the Tendai sect located in Yamashina-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Goho. The main temple is Bishamonten. The official name is Gohozan Ankokuin Izumo-ji. It is one of the ruins of the Tendai sect of Kyoto and is also called Yamashina Bishamondo and Bishamondo Gate Ruins.

Wikipedia: 毘沙門堂 (JA), Website

51. Shunkouin temple

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Shunkō-in is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan and belongs to the Myōshin-ji school, which is the largest among 14 Japanese Rinzai Zen Buddhist schools. The temple was established in 1590 by Horio Yoshiharu, who was a feudal lord, or daimyō, of Matsue in present-day Shimane Prefecture. This temple houses important historical objects that reflect the multifaceted religious and artistic atmosphere in Japan from the sixteenth century onward.

Wikipedia: Shunkō-in (EN)

52. 今熊野観音寺

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今熊野観音寺 Original uploader was Nnn at ja.wikipedia (Edited by 663highland) / CC BY 3.0

Imakumano Kannonji Temple is a temple of the Shingon sect of the Senjoji sect located in Senjoji Yamauchi-cho, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto. The head of the tower of Sohonzan Senchung Temple. The name of the mountain is Mt. Shinnachi. The honzon is the eleven-sided Kannon. The official name of the temple is Kannonji, but it is also known by the common name of "Imakumano". 33 West Country No. 15 Temple. Luoyang Thirty-Three Guanyin Shrine No. 19.

Wikipedia: 今熊野観音寺 (JA)

53. 上御霊神社

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Kamigoryōjinja is a shrine located in Kamigorei-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto. The former company name was Fusha. The name of the shrine corresponds to the lower Gorei Shrine, and the official name of the religious corporation is now "Mirei Shrine".

Wikipedia: 上御霊神社 (JA)

54. Suzumushi Temple

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Kegonji Temple is a temple of the Rinzai sect located in Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture. The name of the mountain is Mr./Ms.. The honzon is Dainichi Nyorai. Because bellworms are bred throughout the four seasons, it is commonly called "Suzumushidera".

Wikipedia: 華厳寺 (京都市) (JA), Website

55. 角屋もてなしの文化美術館

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Sumiya is a restaurant (restaurant and banquet facility) that used to operate in Shimabara Hanagai (now Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto City) in Kyoto. The building has been designated as an important cultural property of Japan, and has been open to the public since 1998 as the "Kakuya Hospitality Culture Museum".

Wikipedia: 角屋 (JA)

56. Chōraku-ji Temple

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Chorakuji Temple is a temple of the Tokishu sect located in Maruyama-cho, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Huangtai Mountain, Mr./Ms.. The honzon is Jun Hu Kannon. It is located in the southeast of Maruyama Park. In the past, the precincts were vast, including most of Maruyama Park and most of the precincts of the Otani Shrine (Higashi-Otani) of the Shinshu Otani school. Luoyang Thirty-Three Guanyin Sacred Ground No. 7.

Wikipedia: 長楽寺 (京都市) (JA)

57. 7105

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7105100yen 23:22, 26 July 2007 (UTC) / CC BY-SA 3.0

The JGR Class 7100 is a class of Japanese steam locomotive which was first used in Hokkaido, upon the establishment of the government-sponsored Horonai Railway in 1880. The locomotives were imported from the United States.

Wikipedia: JGR Class 7100 (EN)

58. D52-468

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The Class D52 is a type of 2-8-2 steam locomotive built by the Japanese Government Railways and various manufacturers: Kisha Seizo, Nippon Sharyo, Kawasaki Heavy Industries Rolling Stock Company, Hitachi, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries from 1943 to 1946. The name consists of a "D" for the four sets of driving wheels and the class number 52 for tender locomotives that the numbers 50 through 99 were assigned to under the 1928 locomotive classification rule.

Wikipedia: JNR Class D52 (EN)

59. Jakkō-in

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Jakkō-in PlusMinus / CC BY-SA 3.0

Jakkoin is a temple of the Tendai sect located in Ohara, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. Nunnery. The name of the mountain is Qingxiang Mountain. The name of the temple is Gyokusenji. The honzon is Jizo Bodhisattva. Kaiki (founder) is said to be Prince Shotoku. It is the place where Taira Kiyomori's daughter, Kenreimonin Tokuko, lived in seclusion after the fall of the Heike family, and is known as the temple associated with "The Tale of the Heike".

Wikipedia: 寂光院 (JA)

60. Narasaki Ryō

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Narasaki Ryō

Narasaki Ryō was a Japanese woman and the wife of Sakamoto Ryōma, an architect of the Meiji Restoration. She is commonly called Oryō (お龍) in Japan. After the death of her first husband, she married the merchant Nishimura Matsubē and was renamed to Nishimura Tsuru .

Wikipedia: Narasaki Ryō (EN)

61. Kyoto International Manga Museum

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Kyoto International Manga Museum Maximilian Dörrbecker (Chumwa) / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Kyoto International Manga Museum is located in Nakagyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan. The museum's collection includes approximately 300,000 items as of 2016, with 50,000 volumes of manga that can be accessed and read by visitors and approximately 250,000 items in its closed-stack collection, which can be accessed via a dedicated research room supported by reference facilities. Collected materials include Edo period woodblock prints, pre-war magazines, post-war rental books, and popular modern series from around the world.

Wikipedia: Kyoto International Manga Museum (EN), Website

62. Bukkoji Temple

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Bukkō-ji , also known as the "Temple of the Buddha's Light", was originally named Kōshō-ji, a Jōdo Shinshū temple in the Yamashina ward of Kyoto, which later moved to the heart of Kyoto. The temple was founded and officially opened by a disciple named Ryōgen in 1324, but by the 15th century, Bukkō-ji was the largest and most successful temple, and its network of branch temples extending throughout the provinces of western Japan. As a rival to the Hongan-ji, it received much criticism for its evangelical practices from Kakunyo the head of the Hongan-ji. Around 1481, however, Bukkō-ji became a subordinate temple to the Hongan-ji. Many of the Bukkō-ji's congregation thus became members of the Hongan-ji, thus greatly reducing the stature.

Wikipedia: Bukkō-ji (EN)

63. Monkey Park Iwatayama

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Iwatayama Monkey Park is a commercial park located in Arashiyama in Kyoto, Japan. The park is on Mt Arashiyama, on the opposite side of the Ōi River as the train station. It is inhabited by a troop of over 120 Japanese macaque monkeys. The animals are wild but can be fed food purchased at the site.

Wikipedia: Iwatayama Monkey Park (EN)

64. 将軍山城

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将軍山城

Shogun Yamashiro (shogun Yamashiro) was a Japan castle (mountain castle) of the Sengoku period located on Mount Uryu (301 meters above sea level) in Kitashirakawa Kiyosawaguchi-cho (Yamashiro Kuni Atago District), Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan. It is also known as Kitashirakawa Castle, Uryūyama Castle Mr./Ms. and Shogun Jizoyama Castle.

Wikipedia: 将軍山城 (JA)

65. Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art

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The Kyoto City KYOCERA Museum of Art (京都市京セラ美術館) is located in Okazaki Park in Sakyō-ku Kyoto. Formerly Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art , it is one of the oldest art museums in Japan. it opened in 1928 as Shōwa Imperial Coronation Art Museum of Kyoto, a commemoration of Emperor Hirohito's coronation.

Wikipedia: Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art (EN), Website

66. 妙満寺

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Myomanji Temple is the main temple of the Kenhon Hoka sect located in Iwakura, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Myotao. The main temple is the Three Treasures. It is known for having a bell related to the legend of Anjin and Kiyohime.

Wikipedia: 妙満寺 (JA)

67. myorenji

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Myorenji Temple is a temple of the main temple of the Honmon Hoka sect located in Myorenji-maemachi, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Uboku Mr./Ms.. The main Buddha is the Ten Realms Mandala. It is famous for Fuyo.

Wikipedia: 妙蓮寺 (京都市) (JA)

68. Konoshima Shrine

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Konoshima Shrine

Kijima Za Amaterasu Soul Shrine (Konoshimani Masu Amateru Mitamajinja, Kijima Za Amaterasu Soul Shrine) is a shrine located in Uzumasa Morigahigashi Town, Ukyo Ward, Kyoto. It is a Shikinai shrine (Meishin Taisha), and the former company name is Gosha.

Wikipedia: 木嶋坐天照御魂神社 (JA)

69. 妙光寺

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妙光寺

Myokoji Temple is a temple of the Rinzai sect of Kenninji in Utanokaminoya-cho, Ukyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan. The name of the mountain is Shokakuzan. The honzon is Shakyamuni Buddha, the Kaiki (founder) is the Hanasanin Shitsugu, and the Kaizan is the Comfort Mind (Muhon Kakushin / Dharma Kokushi).

Wikipedia: 妙光寺 (京都市) (JA)

70. 梨木神社

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梨木神社

Nashiki Shrine is a shrine located in Someden-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto. The former company status is a separate government company. The shrine is dedicated to the father and son of Mimi Sanjo, who contributed greatly to the Meiji Restoration. In addition, about 500 hagi plants are planted in the temple grounds, also known as Hagi no Miya, and the Hagi Festival is held in mid to late September.

Wikipedia: 梨木神社 (JA)

71. 9633

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The Class 9600 (9600形) is a type of 2-8-0 steam locomotive built by Japanese Government Railways from 1913. The Class 9600 was the first type of locomotive to be mass-produced by Japanese manufacturers. The Class 9600 were popularly known as Kyuroku (nine-six), and were extensively used for freight service throughout Japan. They were numbered 9600-9699, 19600-19699, 29600-29699, 39600-39699, 49600-49699, 59600-59699, 69600-69699 and 79600-79669. All 770 remained in service until the 2nd of March 1976, when all steam-hauled service on JNR's network has been phased out.

Wikipedia: JNR Class 9600 (EN)

72. Shinju-an temple

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Shinjuan is the head of the Rinzai sect Daihonzan Daitokuji Temple in Murasakino, Kita-ku, Kyoto, Japan. It is a temple related to Ikkyu Sojun, who is famous as an unconventional Zen monk. It is usually closed to the public, except during special public occasions.

Wikipedia: 真珠庵 (JA)

73. 妙伝寺

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Myōdenji Temple is the main temple of Nichiren Buddhism located in Kitamonzen-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture. The name of the mountain is Mt. Hokyo. There are five temples (Myosha-in, Enritsu-in, Ryugaku-in, Honko-in, and Tamaju-in).

Wikipedia: 妙傳寺 (京都市左京区北門前町) (JA)

74. Chōhō Temple

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Chōhō Temple 663highland on Japanese Wikipedia / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Rokkaku-dō , official name Chōhō-ji , is a Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan, said to have been established by Prince Shōtoku. The name comes from its main hall's hexagonal shape. This temple is part of the Saigoku Kannon Pilgrimage.

Wikipedia: Rokkaku-dō (EN), Website

75. Kyoto Municipal Museum of School History

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Kyoto City School History Museum is a museum located in Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture. Until 2010 (Heisei 22), it is operated by the Kyoto City Lifelong Learning Promotion Foundation, and from 2011 (Heisei 23), it is operated by the Kyoto City Board of Education. In addition to the permanent exhibition, which is centered on the former program elementary school, special exhibitions are held 4~5 times a year. The first director of the museum was Masaaki Ueda (~2005), and the current director is Atsuyuki Uemura.

Wikipedia: 京都市学校歴史博物館 (JA)

76. Adashino-Nenbutsudera Temple

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Adashino-Nenbutsudera Temple

Adashino Nenbutsu-ji is a Buddhist temple in Ukyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan. In 811 Kūkai is said to have founded a temple, then Honen altered it to the present Nenbutsuji. Situated high on a hill overlooking the city from the northwest, it sits in an area where since the Heian period people abandoned the bodies of the dead, exposing them to the wind and rain. Now, some eight thousand Buddhist statuettes, which had been scattered around Adashino then collected about 1903, memorialize the souls of the dead. During its well-known 'sento kuyo' ceremony dedicated to the spirits of the dead on the evenings of 23 and 24 August, about ten thousand stone statues are lit up with candles.

Wikipedia: Adashino Nenbutsu-ji (EN)

77. Salvation Army Kyoto Corps

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Salvation Army Kyoto Corps

A Salvation Army corps is a local church organization and physical place of worship in The Salvation Army. Like the Christian term "church" a corps includes both the physical building and the body of members who attend at the building. In keeping with Salvationist convention in using military terminology, corps are sometimes casually known as barracks. Traditionally many corps buildings are alternatively called temples or citadels, such as Openshaw Citadel. The Salvation Army also uses the more traditional term "church" for some local congregations and their buildings.

Wikipedia: Salvation Army corps (EN)

78. Ryu-hon-ji

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Ryūhonji Temple is the main temple of Nichiren Buddhism located in Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture. The name of the mountain is Mt. Guashi. There are four temples (Shōgyō-in, Kyōhō-in, Hikari-in, and Daiwa-in).

Wikipedia: 立本寺 (JA)

79. Tenju-an

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Tenju-an Hiro2006 / CC BY-SA 3.0

Tenjuan is a temple of the Nanzenji sect of the Rinzai sect located in Fukuchi-cho, Nanzenji, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. The head of the pagoda of Daihonzan Nanzen-ji Temple. The name of the mountain is Mt. Zuiryu. The main Buddha is Buddha. It was opened by the 15th generation of Nanzenji Temple, Huguan Shiren, as a pagoda to enshrine Muguan Pumon (Daming Guoshi) of Nanzenji Kaizan.

Wikipedia: 天授庵 (JA)

80. 引接寺

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Injoji Temple is a temple of the Koyasan Shingon sect located in Senbondori Rozanji Temple, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Kwangmyeong. The main Buddha is the King of Magic. It is commonly known as Senbon Zhenma-do. He is known for his spring nembutsu kyogen.

Wikipedia: 引接寺 (京都市) (JA)

81. Higashi-Tenno Okazaki-Jinja

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Higashi-Tenno Okazaki-Jinja KENPEI / CC BY-SA 3.0

Okazaki Shrine is a shrine located in Okazaki Higashi-Tenno-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. It is also known as the "Eastern Heavenly King". Since the surrounding area was once the habitat of wild rabbits, rabbits are said to be the messengers of the gods.

Wikipedia: 岡崎神社 (JA)

82. Entsu-ji

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Entsuji Temple is a temple of the Rinzai sect of Myoshinji sect located in Iwakura Hataeda-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Daisashi. The main temple is Saint Kannon. It is known for its Entsuji Gardens (a national scenic spot).

Wikipedia: 円通寺 (京都市左京区) (JA), Website

83. Joshoko-ji Temple

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Joshouji Temple is a temple of the Tenryuji sect of the Rinzai sect located in Ukyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Daiō Meizan. The main Buddha is Buddha. The detailed name is Dai Yu Meizan Manju Josho Emperor Zen Temple. It is a temple associated with His Holiness the Light Gong.

Wikipedia: 常照皇寺 (JA)

84. Jisso-in Temple

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Jissoin is a temple of the Tendai sect located in Iwakura Kamizocho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Iwakura. The honzon is Fudo Myo. The opening of the mountain is a jōki. It is one of the mondo temples. It is also called the Iwakura Jissoin Gate Ruins. It used to be one of the ruins of the Tendai Sect Temple Gate Sect (Tendai Temple Gate Sect).

Wikipedia: 実相院 (JA)

85. 宝厳院

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宝厳院 PlusMinus / CC BY-SA 3.0

Hogon-in is a temple of the Tenryuji sect of the Rinzai sect located in Saga-tenryu-ji, Ukyo-ku, Kyoto. The head of the tower of Tenryuji Temple. The name of the mountain is Mt. Ōkame. The honzon is the eleven-sided Kannon. Gardens and buildings are used for filming period dramas. In addition, the word "blue maple" was spread from the "maple" in early summer at our hospital.

Wikipedia: 宝厳院 (JA), Website

86. Shugaku-in Imperial Villa

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The Shugaku-in Imperial Villa , or Shugaku-in Detached Palace, is a set of gardens and outbuildings in the hills of the eastern suburbs of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of Japan's most important large-scale cultural treasures; its gardens are one of the great masterpieces of Japanese gardening.

Wikipedia: Shugakuin Imperial Villa (EN)

87. Jingo-ji Temple

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Jingo-ji (神護寺) is a Buddhist temple in Kyoto. It stands on Mount Takao to the northwest of the center of the city. The temple adheres to Shingon Buddhism. Its principal image is a statue of Bhaisajyaguru, the Buddha of Healing or "Medicine Buddha".

Wikipedia: Jingo-ji (EN)

88. D50-140

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D50-140

The Class D50 is a type of 2-8-2 steam locomotive built by the Japanese Government Railways (JGR), the Japanese National Railways (JNR) and various manufacturers from 1923 to 1931. The class name indicates that the locomotive has four sets of driving wheels (D) and belongs to one of the classes of tender locomotive allocated a number in the series 50 to 99 in the Japan Railways locomotive numbering and classification scheme of 1928. Hideo Shima designed the rest of the class until 1931.

Wikipedia: JNR Class D50 (EN)

89. Murin-an

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Murin-an Oilstreet / CC BY 2.5

Murin-an (無鄰菴) is a Japanese garden in Kyoto, owned by political and military leader Gensui Prince Yamagata Aritomo, designed by Ogawa Jihei and built between 1894 and 1898. It is an example of a classical Japanese promenade garden of the Meiji Period.

Wikipedia: Murin-an (EN)

90. Nanzen-in Temple

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Nanzen-in Temple PlusMinus / CC BY-SA 3.0

Nanzen-in is a temple of the Nanzenji sect of the Rinzai sect located in Fukuchi-cho, Nanzenji, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. The head of the pagoda of Daihonzan Nanzen-ji Temple. The main statue is a statue of His Holiness Kameyama. It is said to be the birthplace of Nanzenji. In front of the gate, a waterway pavilion built as part of the Lake Biwa Irrigation Project passes.

Wikipedia: 南禅院 (JA), Website

91. C58-1

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The Class C58 is a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement steam locomotive type built by the Japanese Government Railways (JGR) and Japanese National Railways (JNR) from 1938 to 1947. A total of 427 Class C58 locomotives were built and designed by Hideo Shima. Two members of the class are preserved in working order.

Wikipedia: JNR Class C58 (EN)

92. Sekihoji

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Sekihoji Temple is a temple of the Yellow Wood sect located in Fukakusa Ishiminejiyamacho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Hyakujozan. The main Buddha is Buddha. It is also written as "Ishimine Temple".

Wikipedia: 石峯寺 (京都市) (JA)

93. Otagi Nenbutsu Temple

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Otagi Nenbutsu-ji is a Buddhist temple located in the hillside of the Arashiyama neighborhood of Kyoto, Japan. It is known for the 1200 moss-covered rakan statues that cover the hillside around the temple grounds.

Wikipedia: Otagi Nenbutsu-ji (EN), Website

94. 安楽寺

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安楽寺

Anrakuji Temple is a temple of the Jodo sect located in Shikagaya Goshonodancho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Sumiren. The honzon is Amitabha. At the beginning of the Kamakura period, the disciples of the founder of the Pure Land sect, Hōren, Sumirenbo (hereinafter referred to as Sumiren) and Anrakubo (hereinafter referred to as Anraku), established a dojo for the Buddha of Pure Land Buddhism. It is famous for its pumpkin offering, which is held in July to pray for protection from the wind. It is also commonly known as Matsumushi Suzumushi Temple.

Wikipedia: 安楽寺 (京都市) (JA)

95. Koho-an temple

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Kohoan is a temple of the Rinzai sect located in Murasakino, Kita-ku, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture. It is the head of the Rinzai sect Daitokuji sect Daihonzan Daitokuji Temple. It is located at the western end of the Daitokuji precinct, away from the other pagoda groups. The name "Fox" means "one boat" and was given to him by Haruya Soen, where Kobori Masaichi (Enshu) studied. It is closed to the public, but once every few years there is a special opening for about 10 days.

Wikipedia: 孤篷庵 (JA)

96. Shōden Temple

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Shodenji Temple is a temple of the Nanzenji sect of the Rinzai sect located in Kita-ku, Kyoto. The name of the mountain is Mt. Kichijo. The main Buddha is Buddha. The name of the temple is called Shoden Gokokuzenji for details. It has the prestige of Moroyama.

Wikipedia: 正伝寺 (JA), Website

97. Atago Shrine

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Atago Shrine is a Shinto shrine on Mount Atago, the northwest of Kyoto, Japan. Enshrined is Atago Gongen who protects Kyoto from fire. Shugendō practices and a place for worship are known from the eighth century. The late-Kamakura period Honden has been designated an Important Cultural Property. Atago Jinja is the head of nine hundred Atago shrines throughout Japan.

Wikipedia: Atago Shrine (Kyoto) (EN), Website

98. Daishogun Hachi Shrine

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Daishogun Hachijinja is a shrine located in Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto. The main deity is the Rustic Son. The original priest was a great general. The name of the shrine, "Eight Shrines," comes from the place where it enshrines the Eight Generals, the calendar god of the Yin-Yang Way, and later it also overlapped with the meaning of the Eight Pillars of the Son God of the Rustic Spirit.

Wikipedia: 大将軍八神社 (JA)

99. Zuihō-in temple

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Zuihoin is a temple of the Daitokuji sect of the Rinzai sect located in Murasakino Daitokuji-cho, Kita-ku, Kyoto. The head of the tower of Daitokuji Temple. The name of the mountain is Longpao Mountain. The main Buddha is Guanyin Bodhisattva. There is a grave of Mr. and Mrs. Otomo Yoshizhen in the temple grounds.

Wikipedia: 瑞峯院 (JA)

100. 8630

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The Class 8620 (8620形) is a type of 2-6-0 steam locomotive built in Japan from 1914 to 1929. It was Japan's first mass-produced passenger locomotive. A total of 672 Class 8620 locomotives were built. Originally they had a symmetry of line with shapely cast iron chimneys which gave way to plainer chimneys and smoke deflectors were added in later years.

Wikipedia: JGR Class 8620 (EN)

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Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.