100 Sights in Rome, Italy (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Rome, Italy. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 100 sights are available in Rome, Italy.

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1. Acquedotto Felice

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The Acqua Felice is one of the aqueducts of Rome, completed in 1586 by Pope Sixtus V, whose birth name, which he never fully abandoned, was Felice Peretti. The first new aqueduct of early modern Rome, its source is at the springs at Pantano Borghese, off Via Casilina. Its length is fifteen miles (24 km), running underground for eight miles (13 km) from its source, first in the channel of Aqua Alexandrina, then alternating on the arches of the Aqua Claudia and the Aqua Marcia for seven miles (11 km) to its terminus at the Fontana dell'Acqua Felice on the Quirinal Hill, standing to one side of the Strada Pia, so as to form a piazza in this still new part of Rome. The engineer was Giovanni Fontana, brother of Sixtus' engineer-architect Domenico Fontana, who recorded that the very day the new pope entered the Lateran, he decided that he would bring water once again to the hills of Rome, which had remained waterless and sparsely inhabited, largely by monasteries, since the Roman aqueducts had been destroyed in the sixth century. From the source, which Sixtus purchased, there was only a very small fall, and the work required an underground conduit as well as an aqueduct carried on arches.

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2. Thermae Traianae

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The Baths of Trajan were a massive thermae, a bathing and leisure complex, built in ancient Rome starting from 104 AD and dedicated during the kalendae of July in 109. Commissioned by Emperor Trajan, the complex of baths occupied space on the southern side of the Oppian Hill on the outskirts of what was then the main developed area of the city, although still inside the boundary of the Servian Wall. The architect of the complex is said to be Apollodorus of Damascus. The baths were being utilized mainly as a recreational and social center by Roman citizens, both men and women, as late as the early 5th century. The complex seems to have been deserted soon afterwards as a cemetery dated to the 5th century has been found in front of the northeastern exedra. The baths were thus no longer in use at the time of the siege of Rome by the Ostrogoths in 537; with the destruction of the Roman aqueducts, all thermae were abandoned, as was the whole of the now-waterless Mons Oppius. Early Christian writers misnamed the remains the "Baths of Domitian".

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3. Quattro Fontane

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The Quattro Fontane is an ensemble of four Late Renaissance fountains located at the intersection of Via delle Quattro Fontane and Via del Quirinale in Rome. They were commissioned by Pope Sixtus V and built at the direction of Muzio Mattei, and were installed between 1588 and 1593. The figure of one fountain is said to represent the River Tiber, in front of an oak-tree; a she-wolf, the symbol of Rome, was a later addition. A second fountain represents the River Aniene, a tributary of the Tiber, called Anio in ancient Rome, which provided most Roman aqueducts with water. Pope Sixtus proposed to build a canal to bring the water of the Aniene to Rome. The other two fountains feature female figures believed to represent the Goddess Diana; the symbol of Chastity; and the Goddess Juno, the symbol of Strength, but it is possible that they may also represent rivers. The fountains of the Aniene, Tiber, and Juno are the work of Domenico Fontana. The fountain of Diana was designed by the painter and architect Pietro da Cortona.

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4. Piazza del Campidoglio

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Piazza del Campidoglio Lasagnolo9 / CC BY-SA 4.0

Piazza del Campidoglio is a monumental square located on the top of Colle Campidoglio in Rome. It stands on the ASYLUM - the depression located between the Arx and the Capitolium, the two tops of the Capitol - and below it is the Tabularium, visible from the Roman Forum. Despite an initial abandonment in the medieval period, the tabularium, already in the twelfth century, had been chosen as the seat of the Municipality. The square assumed the current structure in the 16th century, when Paolo III commissioned Michelangelo Buonarroti the total remake on the occasion of the visit to Rome of Emperor Charles V. The project provided for the remake of the facades of the Senatorial Palace, built a few years earlier on Ruderi del Tabularium, and the Palazzo dei Conservatori, the construction of the new palace and the addition of different sculptures and statues, including that of Marcus Aurelio, located in the center of the square, and those depicting the Tiber and the Nile.

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5. Cloaca Máxima

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Cloaca Máxima Gradvmedusa / Public domain

The Cloaca Maxima was one of the world's earliest sewage systems. Its name derives from Cloacina, a Roman goddess. Built during either the Roman Kingdom or early Roman Republic, it was constructed in Ancient Rome in order to drain local marshes and remove waste from the city. It carried effluent to the River Tiber, which ran beside the city. The sewer started at the Forum Augustum and ended at the Ponte Rotto and Ponte Palatino. It began as an open air canal, but it developed into a much larger sewer over the course of time. Agrippa renovated and reconstructed much of the sewer. This would not be the only development in the sewers. By the first century CE all eleven Roman aqueducts were connected to the sewer. After the Roman Empire fell the sewer still was used. By the 1800s it became a tourist attraction. Some parts of the sewer are still used today. Whilst still being used it was highly valued as a sacred symbol of Roman culture, and Roman engineering.

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6. Basilica di Sant'Agnese fuori le mura

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Basilica di Sant'Agnese fuori le mura / Public domain

The church of Saint Agnes Outside the Walls is a titulus church, minor basilica in Rome, on a site sloping down from the Via Nomentana, which runs north-east out of the city, still under its ancient name. What are said to be the remains of Saint Agnes are below the high altar. The church is built over the Catacombs of Saint Agnes, where the saint was originally buried, and which may still be visited from the church. A large basilica with the same name was built nearby in the 4th century and its ruins can be seen near Santa Costanza, in the same site. The existing church was built by Pope Honorius I in the 7th century, and largely retains its original structure, despite many changes to the decoration. In particular the mosaic in the apse of Agnes, Honorius, and another Pope is largely in its original condition. The current Cardinal Priest of the Titulus S. Agnetis Extra moenia is Camillo Ruini.

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7. Chiesa della Gran Madre di Dio

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Chiesa della Gran Madre di Dio Croberto68 / Public domain

Gran Madre di Dio is a cardinal's titular church in Rome. Its current holder is Angelo Bagnasco, Archbishop of Genoa, who was created a cardinal on 24 November 2007. The church was established as a titular church in 1965. The monumental temple was built by Pope Pius XI in 1931, in memory of the celebrations held to commemorate the 1,500 anniversary of the Council of Ephesus, which established the dogma of the divine motherhood and her perpetual virginity of Mary, in the patristic tradition and popular devotion since From the Church. It was built between 1931 and 1933 by architect Cesare Bazzani, built by Clemente Busiri Vici. It is the seat of the parish of the same name, erected by Pius XI on 1 December 1933, the year of Jubilee extraordinary redemption, in the Apostolic Constitution "Quo perennius".

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8. San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane

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San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane Welleschik / CC BY-SA 3.0

The church of San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, also called San Carlino, is a Roman Catholic church in Rome, Italy. The church was designed by the architect Francesco Borromini and it was his first independent commission. It is an iconic masterpiece of Baroque architecture, built as part of a complex of monastic buildings on the Quirinal Hill for the Spanish Trinitarians, an order dedicated to the freeing of Christian slaves. He received the commission in 1634, under the patronage of Cardinal Francesco Barberini, whose palace was across the road. However, this financial backing did not last and subsequently the building project suffered various financial difficulties. It is one of at least three churches in Rome dedicated to San Carlo, including San Carlo ai Catinari and San Carlo al Corso.

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9. Ara Pacis Augustae

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The Ara Pacis Augustae is an altar in Rome dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was commissioned by the Roman Senate on July 4, 13 BC to honour the return of Augustus to Rome after three years in Hispania and Gaul and consecrated on January 30, 9 BC. Originally located on the northern outskirts of Rome, a Roman mile from the boundary of the pomerium on the west side of the Via Flaminia, the Ara Pacis stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 metres (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938, turned 90° counterclockwise from its original orientation so that the original western side now faces south.

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10. Cimitero acattolico di Roma

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Cimitero acattolico di Roma LuciusCommons / Public domain

The Cimitero Acattolico of Rome, often referred to as the Cimitero dei protestanti or Cimitero degli Inglesi, is a private cemetery in the rione of Testaccio in Rome. It is near Porta San Paolo and adjacent to the Pyramid of Cestius, a small-scale Egyptian-style pyramid built between 18 and 12 BC as a tomb and later incorporated into the section of the Aurelian Walls that borders the cemetery. It has Mediterranean cypress, pomegranate and other trees, and a grassy meadow. It is the final resting place of non-Catholics including but not exclusive to Protestants or British people. The earliest known burial is that of a Dr Arthur, a Protestant medical doctor hailing from Edinburgh, in 1716. The English poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley are buried there.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

11. Battistero Lateranense

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The domed octagonal Lateran Baptistery stands somewhat apart from the Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran, Rome, to which it has become joined by later construction. This baptistery was founded by Pope Sixtus III in 440, perhaps on an earlier structure, for a legend grew up that Constantine the Great had been baptized there and enriched the structure. However it is more likely that if he was baptized it was in the Eastern part of the Roman Empire and possibly by an Arian bishop. This baptistry was for many generations the only baptistery in Rome, and its octagonal structure, centered upon the large octagonal basin for full immersions, provided a model for others throughout Italy, and even an iconic motif of illuminated manuscripts, "The fountain of Life".

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12. Sepolcro del fornaio Eurisace

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The tomb of Marcus Vergilius Eurysaces the baker is one of the largest and best-preserved freedman funerary monuments in Rome. Its sculpted frieze is a classic example of the "plebeian style" in Roman sculpture. Eurysaces built the tomb for himself and perhaps also his wife Atistia around the end of the Republic. Located in a prominent position just outside today's Porta Maggiore, the tomb was transformed by its incorporation into the Aurelian Wall; a tower subsequently erected by Honorius covered the tomb, the remains of which were exposed upon its removal by Gregory XVI in 1838. What is particularly significant about this extravagant tomb is that it was built by a freedman, a former slave.

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13. Porta Pia

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Porta Pia / Public domain

Porta Pia is a gate in the Aurelian Walls of Rome, Italy. One of Pope Pius IV's civic improvements to the city, it is named after him. Situated at the end of a new street, the Via Pia, it was designed by Michelangelo in replacement for the Porta Nomentana situated several hundred meters southwards, which was closed up at the same time. Construction began in 1561 and ended in 1565, after the artist's death. A 1561 bronze commemorative medal by Gian Federico Bonzagna shows an early plan by Michelangelo, very different from his final design. The façade on the outside of the city was completed in 1869 under the Neo-Classicist design by Virginio Vespignani.

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14. Oratorio di San Giovanni in Oleo

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Oratorio di San Giovanni in Oleo user:Lalupa / Public domain

San Giovanni in Oleo is a chapel adjacent to the church of San Giovanni a Porta Latina in Rome. It commemorates the place where, according to legend, in 92 CE, at the hands of the emperor Domitian, the apostle John was immersed in a vat of boiling oil from which he emerged unharmed. Tradition relates that, having failed to execute the apostle, Domitian exiled him to the island of Patmos where John wrote the biblical Book of Revelation. It is supposed that John later died and was buried in Ephesus where a large basilica was built to house his relics. He is held to be the only one of the Twelve Disciples to have been spared from martyrdom.

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15. Chiesa di San Roberto Bellarmino

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Chiesa di San Roberto Bellarmino Croberto68 / Public domain

San Roberto Bellarmino is a church in Rome founded by Pope Pius XI in 1933, after the canonisation of the Jesuit Cardinal Robert Bellarmine (1542-1621) in 1930, and his being named a Doctor of the Church in 1931. The architect Clemente Busiri Vici made the designs in the years 1931–1933. Construction took more than two decades, and it was consecrated in 1959 by Archbishop Luigi Traglia. It is served by the Jesuits, and has a mosaic by Renato Tomassi and a high altar donated by Beniamino Gigli. San Roberto Bellarmino is a titular church. Its cardinal priest is Cardinal Mario Aurelio Poli, who was created Cardinal on 22 February 2014.

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16. Imperatore Costantino il Grande

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The Vision of Constantine is an equestrian sculpture by the Italian artist Gian Lorenzo Bernini, located in the Scala Regia by St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City. Originally commissioned as a free standing work of art within St. Peter's itself, the sculpture was finally unveiled in 1670 as an integral part of the Scala Regia - Bernini's redesigned stairway between St. Peter's Basilica and the Vatican Palace. Unlike other large works by Bernini, art historians have suggested that this work was almost entirely undertaken by him - no other sculptors have been recorded as receiving payment. Bernini's overall fee was 7,000 Roman scudi.

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17. Chiesa di San Luigi dei Francesi

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The Church of St. Louis of the French is a Roman Catholic church in Rome, not far from Piazza Navona. The church is dedicated to the Virgin Mary, to St. Denis the Areopagite and St. Louis IX, king of France. The church was designed by Giacomo della Porta and built by Domenico Fontana between 1518 and 1589, and completed through the personal intervention of Catherine de' Medici, who donated to it some property in the area. It is the national church in Rome of France. It is a titular church. The current Cardinal-Priest of the title is André Vingt-Trois, former Archbishop of Paris.

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18. Carceres del Circo Variano

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Circus Varianus was a Roman circus, possibly started during the reign of Caracalla, residing in the palatial villa complex known as the Sessorium, beside the Amphitheatrum Castrense. This circus has been identified as the space in which Elagabalus raced horses under the family name of Varius, lending the site the name of "Circus Varianus." The remnants of the circus survive to the south of Porta Maggiore, next to the Aurelian Wall, near the church of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme. The dimensions of the circus measure 565 x 125 meters, just slightly smaller than the Circus Maximus.

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19. Santa Maria della Vittoria

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Santa Maria della Vittoria is a Catholic titular church and basilica dedicated to the Virgin Mary in Rome, Italy. The church is known for the masterpiece of Gian Lorenzo Bernini in the Cornaro Chapel, the Ecstasy of Saint Teresa. The church is in the Rione Sallustiano, on number 98 via XX Settembre, where this street intersects with Largo Santa Susanna. It stands to the side of the Fontana dell'Acqua Felice. The church mirrors the Church of Santa Susanna across the Largo. It is about two blocks northwest of the Piazza della Repubblica and Teatro dell'Opera metro stop.

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20. Chiesa di Santa Maria in Monticelli

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Santa Maria in Monticelli is a church in the rione of Regola in Rome, sited on the street of the same name. A church was founded at the site in the 12th century and reconsecrated by Innocent II in 1143. It was known as Sancta Maria in Monticellis Arenulae de Urbe, in a bull by Urban IV in 1264. Little remains of the medieval church, except for the bell-tower. The church was entirely reconstructed in 1716 by Matteo Sassi, on a commission by Clement XI, and in 1860 by Francesco Azzurri. The church is the home to the Curia Generalizia dei Padri Dottrinari.

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21. Giardini del Quirinale

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Giardini del Quirinale H. Inigo Triggs / Public domain

The gardens of the Palazzo del Quirinale constitute the Palazzo del Quirinale Palazzo, surrounded by the walls of the structure itself, strictly connected with the evolution of the monumental complex. The extension of the gardens is about 4 hectares. Access is guaranteed by via del Quirinale crossing Porta Giardini and the style alternates equally between that of the Italian garden and that of the English garden. A separate part of the garden is made up of the "grove" which has singular avenues covered by green pergolas from which the name.

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22. Keats-Shelley Memorial House

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Keats-Shelley Memorial House Keats1795 / Public domain

The Keats–Shelley Memorial House is a writer's house museum in Rome, Italy, commemorating the Romantic poets John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley. The museum houses one of the world's most extensive collections of memorabilia, letters, manuscripts, and paintings relating to Keats and Shelley, as well as Byron, Wordsworth, Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Oscar Wilde, and others. It is located on the second floor of the building situated just to the south of the base of the Spanish Steps and east of the Piazza di Spagna.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

23. Chiesa dei Santi Michele e Magno

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Chiesa dei Santi Michele e Magno Croberto68 at Italian Wikipedia / Public domain

The Church of Saints Michael and Magnus is a Roman Catholic church in Rome, Italy, dedicated to Saint Michael the Archangel and the Bishop Saint Magnus of Anagni. It lies on the northern slope of the Palazzolo hill, in Rione Borgo, near the Vatican, and is the national church dedicated to the Netherlands. It is also known as the "Church of the Frisians". In 1989, the church was granted to the Dutch community in Rome. A 19th century source calls the church Santi Michele e Magno in Sassia, due to a location on a Vico dei Sassoni.

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24. Tempio di Portuno

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The Temple of Portunus or Temple of Fortuna Virilis is a Roman temple in Rome, Italy, one of the best preserved of all Roman temples. Its dedication remains unclear, as ancient sources mention several temples in this area of Rome, without saying enough to make it clear which this is. It was called the Temple of Fortuna Virilis from the Renaissance, and remains better known by this name. If dedicated to Portunus, the god of keys, doors and livestock, and so granaries, it is the main temple dedicated to the god in the city.

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25. Palazzo Falconieri

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The Palazzo Falconieri is a palace in Rome, Italy formed in the seventeenth century as a result of remodelling by the Baroque architect Francesco Borromini. It is the home of the Hungarian Academy Rome, since its foundation in 1927. It is located between Via Giulia and Lungotevere, with entrances to both; it is near Palazzo Farnese and a few houses down and across Via Giulia from the church of Santa Caterina della Rota in the Rione of Regola. From 1814, it was occupied by cardinal Joseph Fesch, Napoleon's uncle.

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26. Chiesa dei Santi Antonio di Padova e Annibale Maria

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The Church of Saint Anthony of Padua on Via Tuscolana is a Roman Catholic titular church in Rome, built for the religious congregation of the Rogationists of the Heart of Jesus, to whose founder Saint Annibale Maria di Francia is co-concercrated the church along with Saint Anthony of Padua. Having been completed in 1948 it was given to the Rogationists fathers, before being concercrated on 27 May 1965 by Cardinal Luigi Traglia. On 5 March 1973 Pope Paul VI granted it a titular church as a seat for Cardinals.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

27. Basilica di San Pietro

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The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican, or simply Saint Peter's Basilica, is a church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave that is within the city of Rome, Italy. It was initially planned by Pope Nicholas V and then Pope Julius II to replace the aging Old St. Peter's Basilica, which was built in the fourth century by Roman emperor Constantine the Great. Construction of the present basilica began on 18 April 1506 and was completed on 18 November 1626.

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28. Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere

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Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere Jensens / Public domain

The Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere ; English: Our Lady in Trastevere) is a titular minor basilica in the Trastevere district of Rome, and one of the oldest churches of Rome. The basic floor plan and wall structure of the church date back to the 340s, and much of the structure to 1140–43. The first sanctuary was built in 221 and 227 by Pope Callixtus I and later completed by Pope Julius I. The church has large areas of important mosaics from the late 13th century by Pietro Cavallini.

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29. Catacombe di Priscilla

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Catacombe di Priscilla
Unknown authorUnknown author
/ Public domain

The Catacomb of Priscilla is an archaeological site on the Via Salaria in Rome, Italy, situated in what was a quarry in Roman times. This quarry was used for Christian burials from the late 2nd century through the 4th century. This catacomb, according to tradition, is named after the wife of the Consul Manius Acilius Glabrio; he is said to have become a Christian and was killed on the orders of Domitian. Some of the walls and ceilings display fine decorations illustrating Biblical scenes.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

30. Piramide di Caio Cestio

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The Pyramid of Cestius is a Roman Era pyramid in Rome, Italy, near the Porta San Paolo and the Protestant Cemetery. It was built as a tomb for Gaius Cestius, a member of the Epulones religious corporation. It stands at a fork between two ancient roads, the Via Ostiensis and another road that ran west to the Tiber along the approximate line of the modern Via Marmorata. Due to its incorporation into the city's fortifications, it is today one of the best-preserved ancient buildings in Rome.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

31. Musei Vaticani

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Musei Vaticani No machine-readable author provided. Fb78 assumed (based on copyright claims). / CC BY 2.5

The Vatican Museums are the public museums of the Vatican City. They display works from the immense collection amassed by the Catholic Church and the papacy throughout the centuries, including several of the most renowned Roman sculptures and most important masterpieces of Renaissance art in the world. The museums contain roughly 70,000 works, of which 20,000 are on display, and currently employ 640 people who work in 40 different administrative, scholarly, and restoration departments.

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32. Teatro romano di Ostia

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The Roman theater of Ostia was built in the Augustan age and reworked at the end of the second century. In the numbering given to the Ostiense buildings by the dug in the post -war period it corresponds to the II, VII, 2. It was built in the area that in the Republican age had been delimited for public use by the urban praetor of Rome along the Tiber, east of the walls of the Republican Castrum. In the Augustan phase he could host 3000 spectators, who became 4000 after the remake.

Wikipedia (IT), Website

33. Porta Magica

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The Alchemical Door, also known as the Alchemy Gate or Magic Portal, is a monument built between 1678 and 1680 by Massimiliano Palombara, marquis of Pietraforte, in his residence, the villa Palombara, which was located on the Esquiline hill, near Piazza Vittorio, in Rome. This is the only one of five former gates of the villa that remains; there was a lost door on the opposite side dating them to 1680 and four other lost inscriptions on the walls of the mansion inside the villa.

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34. Mausoleo di Costanza

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Mausoleo di Costanza Parrocchia di Santa Agnese fuori le Mura / CC BY-SA 2.0

Santa Costanza is a 4th-century church in Rome, Italy, on the Via Nomentana, which runs north-east out of the city. It is a round building with well preserved original layout and mosaics. It has been built adjacent to a horseshoe-shaped church, now in ruins, which has been identified as the initial 4th-century cemeterial basilica of Saint Agnes. Santa Costanza and the old Saint Agnes were both constructed over the earlier catacombs in which Saint Agnes is believed to be buried.

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35. Museo Storico dei Bersaglieri

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The historical museum of the Bersaglieri is located in Rome inside Porta Pia, born to keep memorabilia, documentation and memories relating to the countryside of the Bersaglieri body. including the Bicycle of Enrico Toti, a cyclist target fallen in the First World War decorated with gold medal for military valor. It has a library and a historical archive. From an administrative point of view, it is a military body to the employment of the Military Command of the capital.

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36. ricordo della strage di via Fani

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ricordo della strage di via Fani AP Photo / Public domain

The "Via Fani" ambush was a terrorist attack by Red Brigades militants in Via Mario Fani, Rome, in the early hours of 16 March 1978, with the aim of killing members of Aldo Moro's security forces and kidnapping important Christian Democratic politicians. Fifty-five days after the Red Brigades successfully completed the led-up-era attack, the first operation to kidnap the politician, Moro's body was found in the trunk of a Red Renault 4 on Michelangelo Caetani Avenue.

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37. Ostia Antica

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Ostia Antica is a large archaeological site, close to the modern town of Ostia, that is the location of the harbour city of ancient Rome, 15 miles southwest of Rome. "Ostia" is a derivation of "os", the Latin word for "mouth". At the mouth of the River Tiber, Ostia was Rome's seaport, but due to silting the site now lies 3 kilometres from the sea. The site is noted for the excellent preservation of its ancient buildings, magnificent frescoes and impressive mosaics.

Wikipedia (EN), Heritage Website, Website

38. Basilica Julia

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Basilica Julia L.VII.C / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Basilica Julia was a structure that once stood in the Roman Forum. It was a large, ornate, public building used for meetings and other official business during the Roman Empire. Its ruins have been excavated. What is left from its classical period are mostly foundations, floors, a small back corner wall with a few arches that are part of both the original building and later Imperial reconstructions and a single column from its first building phase.

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39. Sepolcro del Giovinetto Quinto Sulpicio Massimo

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Sepolcro del Giovinetto Quinto Sulpicio Massimo Die Autorenschaft wurde nicht in einer maschinell lesbaren Form angegeben. Es wird Joris als Autor angenommen (basierend auf den Rechteinhaber-Angaben). / Public domain

The tomb of the Quintus Sulpicius Maximus was found during demolition work on the Porta Salaria in Rome. It was under the eastern tower of the goal system, which, after severe damage to a bombardment by Italian troops against the church state on April 20, 1870 the following year, was to make a new building by the architect Virginio Vespignani. A copy of the tomb today stands near his location on the corner via Piave and Via Sulpicio Massimo in Rome.

Wikipedia (DE)

40. Chiesa di Santo Stefano degli Abissini

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St Stephen of the Abyssinians is an Ethiopian Catholic church located in Vatican City. The church dedicated to Stephen the Protomartyr is the national church of Ethiopia. The liturgy is celebrated according to the Alexandrian rite of the Ethiopian Catholic Church. It is one of the only standing structures in the Vatican to survive the destruction of Old St. Peter's Basilica (c. 1505), and thus it is the oldest surviving church in Vatican City.

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41. Monumento a Goethe

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The Goethe Monument is located at the Viale Goethe at the Villa Borghese in Rome. It was designed by German sculptor Gustav Eberian for Emperor William II, who donated it to the city of Rome on his birthday in 1902. However, it was Italian sculptor Valentino Casali who realized Eberian's design in his studio in Berlin. It was made of marble and completed on May 5, 1945. On August 1, 1904, witnessed by King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy. Exposed.

Wikipedia (DE)

42. Villa Medici

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Villa Medici No machine-readable author provided. MM assumed (based on copyright claims). / Public domain

The Villa Medici is a Mannerist villa and an architectural complex with a garden contiguous with the larger Borghese gardens, on the Pincian Hill next to Trinità dei Monti in Rome, Italy. The Villa Medici, founded by Ferdinando I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany and now property of the French State, has housed the French Academy in Rome since 1803. A musical evocation of its garden fountains features in Ottorino Respighi's Fountains of Rome.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

43. Basilica dei Ss. Quattro Coronati

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Basilica dei Ss. Quattro Coronati MarkusMark / Public domain

Santi Quattro Coronati is an ancient basilica in Rome, Italy. The church dates back to the 4th century, and is devoted to four anonymous saints and martyrs. The complex of the basilica with its two courtyards, the fortified Cardinal Palace with the Saint Silvester Chapel, and the monastery with its cosmatesque cloister is built in a silent and green part of Rome, between the Colosseum and San Giovanni in Laterano, in an out-of-time setting.

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44. Mausoleo di Romolo

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The Mausoleum of Maxentius was part of a large complex on the Appian Way in Rome that included a palace and a chariot racing circus, constructed by the Emperor Maxentius. The large circular tomb was built by Maxentius in the early 4th century, probably with himself in mind and as a family tomb, but when his young son Valerius Romulus died he was buried there. After extensive renovation the mausoleum was reopened to the public in 2014.

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45. Fontana delle Tartarughe

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The Fontana delle Tartarughe is a fountain of the late Italian Renaissance, located in Piazza Mattei, in the Sant'Angelo district of Rome, Italy. It was built between 1580 and 1588 by the architect Giacomo della Porta and the sculptor Taddeo Landini. The bronze turtles around the upper basin, usually attributed either to Gian Lorenzo Bernini or Andrea Sacchi, were added in either 1658 or 1659 when the fountain was restored.

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46. Sant'Ignazio di Loyola a Campo Marzio

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The Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola at Campus Martius is a Roman Catholic titular church, of deaconry rank, dedicated to Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus, located in Rome, Italy. Built in Baroque style between 1626 and 1650, the church functioned originally as the chapel of the adjacent Roman College, that moved in 1584 to a new larger building and was renamed the Pontifical Gregorian University.

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47. Castello della Cecchignola

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Cecchignola Castle is a complex of buildings of different ages, home to a number of cultural foundations, a library specializing in art and stone, and the University of Marmorari in Rome's Julian-Dalmatian district. Maggioretta, a major part of the complex, retains two-thirds of its original height and, in addition to its Roman base, it retains visible traces of 13th, 18th and 19th century architectural techniques.

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48. Porta Latina

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The Porta Latina is a single-arched gate in the Aurelian Walls of ancient Rome. It marked the Rome end of the Via Latina and gives its name to the church of San Giovanni a Porta Latina. Most of the present structure dates to Honorius, including the arch's voussoirs. The gate retained its name throughout the Middle Ages. Also nearby are the oratory of San Giovanni in Oleo and the pagan Columbarium of Pomponius Hylas.

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49. San Nicola da Tolentino

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San Nicola da Tolentino agli Orti Sallustiani is a church in Rome. It is referred to in both Melchiori's and Venuti's guides as San Niccolò di Tolentino, and in the latter it adds the suffix a Capo le Case. It is one of the two Roman national churches of Armenia. The church was built for the Discalced Augustinians in 1599, and originally dedicated to the 13th century Augustinian monk, St. Nicholas of Tolentino.

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50. Piazzale delle Corporazioni

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The Forum of Corporations, or the Piazzale delle Corporazioni, was the principal center of commerce and trade for the Roman Empire mainly during the Age of Augustus. Located in the major port city of Ostia, this open-air market was essential for Rome as a place of varying and exotic goods from foreign lands. Merchants gathered here to sell anything from grain and shipping services to elephants and giraffes.

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51. Chiesa di San Callisto

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Chiesa di San Callisto Croberto68 / Public domain

San Callisto is a Roman Catholic titular church in Rome, Italy, built over the site of Pope Callixtus I's martyrdom. The original building dates from the time of Pope Gregory III, who ordered the building of a church on the site. The church has been rebuilt twice since, first in the twelfth century, and the current church in 1610. In 1458 Callixtus III decreed it a titular church as a seat for Cardinals.

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52. Arco di Gallieno

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The Porta Esquilina was a gate in the Servian Wall, of which the Arch of Gallienus is extant today. Tradition dates it back to the 6th century BC, when the Servian Wall was said to have been built by the Roman king Servius Tullius. However modern scholarship and evidence from archaeology indicate a date in the fourth century BC. The archway of the gate was rededicated in 262 as the Arch of Gallienus.

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53. Tempio di Ercole Vincitore

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The Temple of Hercules Victor or Hercules Olivarius ( is a Roman temple in Piazza Bocca della Verità in the area of the Forum Boarium near the Tiber in Rome. It is a tholosa round temple of Greek 'peripteral' design completely surrounded by a colonnade. This layout caused it to be mistaken for a temple of Vesta until it was correctly identified by Napoleon's Prefect of Rome, Camille de Tournon.

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54. Santi Vito e Modesto

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Santi Vito e Modesto user:Lalupa / Public domain

Santi Vito e Modesto is a Roman Catholic church, and appears to have two facades, a 20th-century marble facade on Via Carlo Alberto, but a rustic brick older entrance, in reality the apse, on the Via San Vito in the Rione Esquilino of Rome, Italy. It has also been called Santi Vito, Modesto e Crescenzia. It is located, adjacent to the Servian Wall, near the former Monastery of the Viperesche.

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55. Chiesa di Sant'Anna dei Palafrenieri

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The Church of Saint Anne in the Vatican, known as Sant'Anna de' Parafrenieri, is a Catholic parish church dedicated to Saint Anne in Vatican City. The church is the parish church of the State of Vatican City and is placed under the jurisdiction of the Vicariate of the Vatican City and is located beside the Porta Sant'Anna, an international border crossing between Vatican City State and Italy.

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56. Museo delle Mura

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Museo delle Mura Karelj / Public domain

The Museo delle Mura is an archaeological museum in Rome, Italy. It is housed in the first and second floors of the Porta San Sebastiano at the beginning of the Appian Way. It provides an exhibition on the walls of Rome and their building techniques, as well as the opportunity to walk along the inside of one of the best-preserved stretches of the Aurelian Wall. The museum is free of charge.

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57. Chiesa di Santa Maria Annunziata

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The church of Santa Maria Annunziata in Tor de 'Specchi, also known as the church of the Santissima Annunziata, is a church in Rome, in the Campitelli district, in via Tor de Specchi, annexed to the monastery of Santa Francesca Romana. The church is open to the public only on the day of the feast of the Saint, on March 9, and is annexed to the church of Santa Maria in Portico in Campitelli.

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58. Chiesa di San Patrizio a Villa Ludovisi

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Chiesa di San Patrizio a Villa Ludovisi Croberto68 / Public domain

San Patrizio a Villa Ludovisi is a Roman Catholic parish and titular church in Rome. It was one of the national churches in Rome of Ireland until 2017 when it became the national church of the United States of America. Since August 2017, it has been under the pastoral care of the Missionary Society of Saint Paul the Apostle, a religious order which originated and is based in New York City.

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59. Fontana della Navicella

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Fontana della Navicella MM / Public domain

The Fontana della Navicella is a fountain built around a marble and travertine replica of an Ancient Roman sculpture, depicting a decorated Roman Galley, and erected in front of the church of Santa Maria in Domnica of Rome, Italy. While the statue is a copy (1518-1519) made by Andrea Sansovino on commission from Pope Leo X based on fragments discovered near the church.

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60. Mosè

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Moses is a sculpture by the Italian High Renaissance artist Michelangelo Buonarroti, housed in the church of San Pietro in Vincoli in Rome. Commissioned in 1505 by Pope Julius II for his tomb, it depicts the biblical figure Moses with horns on his head, based on a description in chapter 34 of Exodus in the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Bible used at that time.

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61. Museo Pietro Canonica

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The Pietro Canonica museum is the sculptor home-museum Pietro Canonica and is part of the system of museums in the municipality of Rome. It is located in via Pietro Canonica 2, near Piazza di Siena, in Villa Borghese, near the Fortezzuola. The house, where the artist lived until his death was given to him by the Municipality of Rome who now manages the museum.

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62. Porta Asinaria

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Porta Asinaria user:Lalupa / Public domain

The Porta Asinaria is a gate in the Aurelian Walls of Rome. Dominated by two protruding tower blocks and associated guard rooms, it was built between 270 and 273, at the same time as the Wall itself. It is through this gate that East Roman troops under General Belisarius entered the city in 536, reclaiming the city for the Byzantine Empire from the Ostrogoths.

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63. Basilica parrocchiale dei Santi Pietro e Paolo

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The basilica of Santi Pietro e Paolo a Via Ostiense is one of the titular churches in Rome, to which Cardinal-Priests are appointed. It is a modern building at Piazzale dei Santi Pietro e Paolo 8 in EUR. It is at the west end of the Viale Europa, the last two blocks of which is a monumental approach reserved for pedestrians and paved with polychrome marble.

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64. San Nicola dei Lorenesi

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San Nicola dei Lorenesi Jensens / Public domain

The Church of Saint Nicholas of the Lorrainers is a Roman Catholic church dedicated to Saint Nicholas and the apostle Saint Andrew. It is one of the national churches in Rome dedicated to France. Given to the Lorrainers by Pope Gregory XV in 1622, the pre-existing church of St. Nicholas was redesigned by Lorrainer architect François Desjardins, in 1632.

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65. Fontana delle Naiadi

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The Fountain of the Naiads is a fountain in Rome, Italy, located at the centre of the Piazza della Repubblica on the Viminal Hill. The fountain was created by the architect Alessandro Guerrieri in 1888. Its four bronze sculptures of naiads created by Mario Rutelli were added in 1901 and Rutelli's central sculpture of the god Glaucus was added in 1912.

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66. Chiesa di Sant'Antonio in Campo Marzio

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The church of Saint Anthony in Campo Marzio, known as Saint Anthony of the Portuguese, is a Baroque Roman Catholic titular church in Rome, dedicated to Saint Anthony of Lisbon. The church functions as a national church of the Portuguese community residing in that city and pilgrims visiting Rome and the Vatican. It also serves the Brazilian community.

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67. Chiesa di Santo Spirito in Sassia

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Chiesa di Santo Spirito in Sassia Riccardov / Public domain

Church of the Holy Spirit in the Saxon District is a 12th-century titular church in Rome, Italy. It is in Borgo Santo Spirito, a street which got its name from the church, placed in the southern part of Rione Borgo. The current holder of the titulus is Cardinal-Deacon Dominique Mamberti. It has been the official sanctuary of Divine Mercy since 1994.

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68. Fontana delle Cariatidi

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The Fontana della Piazza dei Quiriti is a fountain in the Piazza dei Quiriti in Rome, in the middle of the Prati rione. The plaza is named after the inhabitants of the city of Cures, the Curites or later Quirites, namely the Sabines, who became inhabitants and co-founders of Rome. Another theory derives the name from the god Quirinus, a Roman deity.

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69. Chiesa di Santa Lucia del Gonfalone

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Santa Lucia del Gonfalone is a church in the diocese of Rome, Italy. It is located on Via dei Banchi Vecchi just one block south of Corso Vittorio Emanuele. The last reconstruction was by Marco David in 1764; the interior was frescoed by Francesco Azzurri in 1866. The church was made a cardinalate deaconry by Pope John Paul II on 21 October 2003.

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70. Chiesa di Santa Maria in Dominica alla Navicella

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The Minor Basilica of St. Mary in Domnica alla Navicella, or simply Santa Maria in Domnica or Santa Maria alla Navicella, is a Roman Catholic basilica in Rome, Italy, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary and active in local charity according to its long tradition. It has been the titular church of Cardinal Marcello Semeraro since 28 November 2020.

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71. Basilica di Sant'Agostino

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The Basilica of St. Augustine in Campo Marzio, commonly known as Basilica of St. Augustine and locally as Sant'Agostino, is a Roman Catholic titular minor basilica dedicated to Saint Augustine of Hippo in Rome, Italy. It is the mother church of the Order of Saint Augustine and it is located near the Piazza Navona in the rione Sant'Eustachio.

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72. Villa di Massenzio

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The Villa of Maxentius is an imperial villa in Rome, built by the Roman emperor Maxentius. The complex is located between the second and third miles of the ancient Appian Way, and consists of three main buildings: the palace, the circus of Maxentius and the dynastic mausoleum, designed in an inseparable architectural unit to honor Maxentius.

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73. Insula dell'Ara Coeli

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The Insula dell'Ara Coeli is one of the few surviving examples of an insula, the kind of apartment blocks where many Roman city dwellers resided. It was built during the 2nd century AD, and rediscovered, under an old church, when Benito Mussolini initiated a plan for massive urban renewal of Rome's historic Capitoline Hill neighbourhood.

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74. Chiesa del Santissimo Nome di Maria

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Chiesa del Santissimo Nome di Maria Croberto68 / Public domain

Santissimo Nome di Maria a Via Latina is a modern parish and titular church at Via Centirupe 18/22 in the Appio Latino quarter, just to the east of the Parco della Caffarella in Rome, Italy. The dedication is to the Holy Name of Mary. The parish is administered by the Marianists and the present head is Gaudencio Borbon Rosales.

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75. Santa Passera

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Santa Passera Croberto68 / Public domain

Santa Passera is a church in the south of Rome on the other bank of the curve in the river Tiber from the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls. The current church, erected in the ninth century, incorporated a Roman tomb. The church served a small community of miners who worked in the tuff quarries of the nearby hills.

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76. Basilica di San Pancrazio

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Basilica di San Pancrazio Croberto68 / Public domain

The basilica of San Pancrazio is a Roman Catholic ancient basilica and titular church founded by Pope Symmachus in the 6th century in Rome, Italy. It stands in via S. Pancrazio, westward beyond the Porta San Pancrazio that opens in a stretch of the Aurelian Wall on the Janiculum. It covers the Catacomb of San Pancrazio.

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77. Basilica di San Martino ai Monti

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San Martino ai Monti, officially known as Santi Silvestro e Martino ai Monti, is a minor basilica in Rome, Italy, in the Rione Monti neighbourhood. It is located near the edge of the Parco del Colle Oppio, near the corner of Via Equizia and Viale del Monte Oppio, about five to six blocks south of Santa Maria Maggiore.

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78. Chiesa di San Gioacchino in Prati

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Chiesa di San Gioacchino in Prati Croberto68 at Italian Wikipedia / Public domain

San Gioacchino ai Prati Castello is a church in Rome dedicated to Saint Joachim, the father of Mary, mother of Jesus. Construction began in 1891 and the building was opened to the public in 1898. It was consecrated on 6 June 1911 by Cardinal Pietro Respighi. Pope John XXIII made it a cardinal's titular church in 1960.

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79. Basilica di Santa Prassede

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The Basilica of Saint Praxedes, commonly known in Italian as Santa Prassede, is an early medieval titular church and minor basilica located near the papal basilica of Saint Mary Major, on Via di Santa Prassede, 9/a in rione Monti of Rome, Italy. The current Cardinal Priest of Titulus Sancta Praxedis is Paul Poupard.

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80. Basilica di Sant'Aurea

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The Basilica of Santa Aurea is a church situated in the Ostia Antica district of Ostia, Italy. Ostia became an episcopal see as early as the 3rd century AD. The present-day church, completed in 1483, it was the seat of the suburbicarian diocese of Ostia until 1966, when Ostia became part of the diocese of Rome.

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81. Parco Regionale Urbano del Pineto

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The Pineto Regional Park is a protected natural area of Lazio, Italy, instituted in 1987. It has an area of approximately 240 hectares, which includes Pineta Sacchetti. The park is in the northwest area of the city of Rome, in Municipio XIX, shared between the districts of Aurelio, Primavalle, and Trionfale.

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82. Chiesa dei Santi Fabiano e Venanzio

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Chiesa dei Santi Fabiano e Venanzio Croberto68 / Public domain

Santi Fabiano e Venanzio a Villa Fiorelli is a church on Via Terni, Rome. The parish was set up by Pope Pius XI, and the church opened for worship as the regional church of the Camerino region in 1936. It was designed by Clemente Busciri Vici, with 3 naves, narrow side-aisles and a slightly slanting roof.

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83. Porta San Paolo

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The Porta San Paolo is one of the southern gates in the 3rd-century Aurelian Walls of Rome, Italy. The Via Ostiense Museum is housed within the gatehouse. It is in the Ostiense quarter; just to the west is the Roman Pyramid of Cestius, an Egyptian-style pyramid, and beyond that is the Protestant Cemetery.

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84. Fontana delle Anfore

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The Fontana delle Anfore, located in Testaccio, a quarter of Rome, Italy. It was completed in 1927, by Pietro Lombardi after he won a competition the municipality of Rome set in 1924 for new local fountains. The motive of the amphorae refers to the Monte Testaccio and to the symbol of the whole quarter.

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85. Casa di Goethe

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The Casa di Goethe is a museum in Rome, in Via del Corso 18, dedicated to Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, his Italian Journey and his life at Rome in the years from 1786 through 1788. During his journey Goethe wrote a journal and also many letters which would be published in 1816-17 as the Italian Journey.

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86. Tor Boacciana

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Tor Boacacciana is a medieval tower located along the shore of the Tiber river, about 4 km from the mouth, in the territory of Rome Capital on the border with that of the municipality of Fiumicino. It stands a short distance from the Scafa bridge, which also took the name of "Tor Boacciana bridge".

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87. Santissima Trinità dei Pellegrini ai Catinari

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The Chiesa della Santissima Trinità dei Pellegrini is a Roman Catholic church located on Via dei Pettinari #36 In the rione of Regola of central Rome, Italy. It stands a block away from the Palazzo Spada on Via Capo di Ferro, while a few blocks away on the Via dei Pettinari stands the Ponte Sisto.

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88. Galleria Colonna

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Galleria Colonna user:Lalupa / Public domain

The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings in central Rome, Italy, at the base of the Quirinal Hill, and adjacent to the church of Santi Apostoli. It is built in part over the ruins of an old Roman serapeum, and it has belonged to the prominent Colonna family for over twenty generations.

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89. Parco Valle dell'Aniene

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Parco Valle dell'Aniene Patafisik / Public domain

The Valle dell'Aniene Natural Reserve is a protected natural area of the Lazio Region, located in the north-east suburbs of Rome. It extends for 650 hectares along the urban course of the Aniene river from the GRA to the confluence with the Tiber river, where the Valli Park is located nearby.

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90. Vigamus - Museo del Videogioco

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Vigamus - Museo del Videogioco Barbiere1138 / Public domain

The Video Game Museum of Rome (VIGAMUS) is an interactive video game museum that displays the history of video games. The first official announcement for the museum was at the Italian Videogame Developer Conference (IVDC) in 2010, and the museum opened its doors to the public in October 2012.

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91. Basilica di San Paolo fuori le mura

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Basilica di San Paolo fuori le mura Berthold Werner / Public domain

The Papal Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls, commonly known as Saint Paul's Outside the Walls, is one of Rome's four major papal basilicas, along with the basilicas of Saint John in the Lateran, Saint Peter's, and Saint Mary Major, as well as one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome.

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92. Porta San Pellegrino

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Porta San Pellegrino is a gate in the outer wall of Vatican City. It is located beside Bernini's Colonnade and the small Vatican post; it is also known as Porta Viridaria. The gate was rebuilt by Pope Alexander VI in 1492 and his arms are at the top of the gate. The gate is little used.

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93. Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi

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Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi
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Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi is a fountain in the Piazza Navona in Rome, Italy. It was designed in 1651 by Gian Lorenzo Bernini for Pope Innocent X whose family palace, the Palazzo Pamphili, faced onto the piazza as did the church of Sant'Agnese in Agone of which Innocent was the sponsor.

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94. San Lazzaro in Borgo

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The Church of San Lazaro, also known as San Lazaro de Leprosy or San Lazaro in Borgo, is a Catholic place of worship in Rome in the Vittoria district of Via Borgo San Lazzaro; It is a rector of the parish of San Giuseppe El Trio Farr, located in the parish of San Giuseppe El Trio Farr.

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95. Santi Biagio e Carlo ai Catinari

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San Carlo ai Catinari, also called Santi Biagio e Carlo ai Catinari is an early-Baroque style church in Rome, Italy. It is located on Piazza Benedetto Cairoli, 117 just off the corner of Via Arenula and Via dei Falegnami, a few blocks south of the church of Sant'Andrea della Valle.

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96. Basilica di Santa Sofia

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Basilica di Santa Sofia Universal Postal Union / Public domain

Santa Sofia a Via Boccea is a church in Rome, Italy. It is dedicated to Holy Wisdom, one of the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit. It served as the mother church of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church while St. George's Cathedral in Lviv was controlled by the Russian Orthodox Church.

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97. Foro Boario

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Foro Boario / Public domain

The Forum Boarium was the cattle forum venalium of ancient Rome. It was located on a level piece of land near the Tiber between the Capitoline, the Palatine and Aventine hills. As the site of the original docks of Rome, the Forum Boarium experienced intense commercial activity.

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98. Basilica Constaninana

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Basilica Constaninana Alessandro Zangrilli / Public domain

Villa Gordiani is a park along the Via Prenestina, in Rome, Italy. It is home to several ancient Roman remains, traditionally identified with the villa of the Gordian imperial family, which included three Roman emperors of the 3rd century, Gordian I, Gordian II and Gordian III.

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99. Chiesa dei Santi Nereo e Achilleo

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Chiesa dei Santi Nereo e Achilleo user:Lalupa / Public domain

Santi Nereo ed Achilleo is a fourth-century basilica church in Rome, Italy, located in via delle Terme di Caracalla in the rione Celio facing the main entrance to the Baths of Caracalla. It has been the titular church of Cardinal Celestino Aós Braco since 28 November 2020.

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100. Ponte Milvio

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The Milvian Bridge is a bridge over the Tiber in northern Rome, Italy. It was an economically and strategically important bridge in the era of the Roman Empire and was the site of the famous Battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312, which led to the imperial rule of Constantine.

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Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.