35 Sights in Jerusalem, Israel (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Jerusalem, Israel. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 35 sights are available in Jerusalem, Israel.

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1. קבר בת פרעה

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קבר בת פרעה No machine-readable author provided. דניאל צבי assumed (based on copyright claims). / Public domain

The Monolith of Silwan, also known as the Tomb of Pharaoh's Daughter, is a cuboid rock-cut tomb located in Silwan, Jerusalem dating from the period of the Kingdom of Judah; the latter name refers to a 19th-century hypothesis that the tomb was built by Solomon for his Egyptian wife. The structure, a typical Israelite rock-cut tomb, was previously capped by a pyramid structure like the Tomb of Zechariah. It is one of the more complete and distinctive First Temple-period structures. The pyramidal rock cap was cut into pieces and removed for quarry during the Roman era, leaving a flat roof. The tomb contains a single stone bench, indicating that it was designed for only one burial. Recent research indicates that the bench was the base of a sarcophagus hewn into the original building.

Wikipedia (EN)

2. Mamilla Pool

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Mamilla Pool Auguste Salzmann / Public domain

Mamilla Pool is one of several ancient reservoirs that supplied water to the inhabitants of the Jerusalem. It is located outside the walls of the Old City about 650 metres (710 yd) northwest of Jaffa Gate in the centre of the Mamilla Cemetery. With a capacity of 30,000 cubic metres, it is connected by an underground channel to Hezekiah's Pool in the Christian Quarter of the Old City. It was thought as possible that it has received water via the so-called Upper or High-Level Aqueduct from Solomon's Pools, but 2010 excavations have discovered the aqueduct's final segment at a much lower elevation near the Jaffa Gate, making it impossible to function as a feeding source for the Mamilla Pool.

Wikipedia (EN)

3. קבר בני חזיר

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קבר בני חזיר No machine-readable author provided. Eman assumed (based on copyright claims). / Public domain

The Tomb of Benei Hezir, previously known as the Tomb of Saint James, is the oldest of four monumental rock-cut tombs that stand in the Kidron Valley, adjacent to the Tomb of Zechariah and a few meters from the Tomb of Absalom. It dates to the period of the Second Temple. It is a complex of burial caves. The tomb was originally accessed from a single rock-cut stairwell which descends to the tomb from the north. At a later period an additional entrance was created by quarrying a tunnel from the courtyard of the monument known as "the Tomb of Zechariah". This is also the contemporary entrance to the burial complex.

Wikipedia (EN)

4. טחנת הרוח

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The Montefiore Windmill is a landmark windmill in Jerusalem. Designed as a flour mill, it was built in 1857 on a slope opposite the western city walls of Jerusalem, where three years later the new Jewish neighbourhood of Mishkenot Sha'ananim was erected, both by the efforts of British Jewish banker and philanthropist Moses Montefiore. Jerusalem at the time was part of Ottoman-ruled Palestine. Today the windmill serves as a small museum dedicated to the achievements of Montefiore. It was restored in 2012 with a new cap and sails in the style of the originals. The mill can turn in the wind.

Wikipedia (EN)

5. פיר וורן

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Warren's Shaft is a vertical shaft next to the Gihon Spring, the main source of water of Bronze and Iron Age Jerusalem, discovered in 1867 by British engineer and archaeologist, Sir Charles Warren (1840–1927). The term is currently used in either a narrower, or a wider sense:In the narrower, initial sense, Warren's Shaft is the almost vertical natural shaft leading down to a pool fed by the Gihon Spring. In the wider sense, as the Warren's Shaft system, it is the Bronze Age water system allowing protected access from the city to the Gihon Spring.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

6. כנסיית הקבר

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The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is a church in the Christian Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem. According to traditions dating back to the fourth century, it contains the two holiest sites in Christianity: the site where Jesus was crucified, at a place known as Calvary or Golgotha, and Jesus's empty tomb, where he is believed by Christians to have been buried and resurrected. The tomb is enclosed by a 19th-century shrine called the Aedicula. The Status Quo, an understanding between religious communities dating to 1757, applies to the site.

Wikipedia (EN), Mapillary

7. כנסיית העליה

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The Chapel of the Ascension is a chapel and shrine located on the Mount of Olives, in the At-Tur district of Jerusalem. Part of a larger complex consisting first of a Christian church and monastery, then an Islamic mosque, it is located on a site the faithful traditionally believed to be the earthly spot where Jesus ascended into Heaven after his Resurrection. It houses a slab of stone believed to contain one of his footprints. The Status Quo, a 250-year-old understanding between religious communities, applies to the site.

Wikipedia (EN)

8. קבר דוד המלך

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קבר דוד המלך Berthold Werner / Public domain

David's Tomb is a site believed by some to be the burial place of biblical king David of Israel, according to a Late Medieval tradition beginning in the 9th CE, some two millennia after the time of David. Historians, archaeologists and Jewish religious authorities do not consider the site to be the actual resting place of King David. It occupies the ground floor of the Cenacle, the "Upper Room" traditionally identified as the place of Jesus' Last Supper and the original meeting place of the early Christian community.

Wikipedia (EN)

9. מערת הנביאים

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מערת הנביאים no idea - see source / Public domain

The Tomb of the Prophets Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi is an ancient burial site located on the upper western slope of the Mount of Olives, Jerusalem. According to a medieval Jewish tradition also adopted by Christians, the catacomb is believed to be the burial place of Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi, the last three Hebrew Bible prophets who are believed to have lived during the 6th-5th centuries BC. Archaeologists have dated the three earliest burial chambers to the 1st century BC, thus contradicting the tradition.

Wikipedia (EN)

10. Dome Of The Rock • כיפת הסלע • قبة الصخرة

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The Dome of the Rock is an Islamic shrine located on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem. Its initial construction was undertaken by the Umayyad Caliphate on the orders of Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna in 691–692 CE, and it has since been situated on top of the site of the Second Jewish Temple, which was destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE. The original dome collapsed in 1015 and was rebuilt in 1022–23. The Dome of the Rock is in its core one of the oldest extant works of Islamic architecture.

Wikipedia (EN), Mapillary

11. אוהל יצחק

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The Ohel Yitzchak Synagogue also known as the Shomrei ha-Chomos Synagogue and the Ungarin Shul is located in the Muslim Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem. It was built as a yeshiva in the 1870s by Kolel Shomrei HaChomos, an organization of Hungarian Jews, but was abandoned after the riots of 1938. Although the building was destroyed after 1948, it has recently been acquired by a Religious Zionist group for refurbishment and was reopened after restoration work finished in October 2008.

Wikipedia (EN)

12. Ecce Homo Basilica

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Ecce Homo Basilica James McDonald / Public domain

The Convent of the Sisters of Zion is a Roman Catholic convent of the Congregation of Notre-Dame de Sion, located near the eastern end of the Via Dolorosa in the Old City of Jerusalem. The convent was built in 1857 by Marie-Alphonse Ratisbonne. The site includes the Church of Ecce Homo, also known as the Basilica of Ecce Homo, named for Pontius Pilate's Ecce homo speech which is traditionally thought to have taken place on the pavement below the church.

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13. מנורת הכנסת

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The Knesset Menorah is a bronze Menorah 4.30 meters high, 3.5 meters wide, and weighs 4 tons. It is located at the edge of Wohl Rose Park opposite the Knesset. It was designed by Benno Elkan (1877–1960), a Jewish sculptor who escaped from his native Germany to Britain. It was presented to the Knesset as a gift from the Parliament of the United Kingdom on April 15, 1956 in honour of the eighth anniversary of Israeli independence.

Wikipedia (EN), Mapillary

14. מרכז מידע הר הזיתים

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The Mount of Olives or Mount Olivet is a mountain ridge east of and adjacent to Jerusalem's Old City. It is named for the olive groves that once covered its slopes. The southern part of the mount was the Silwan necropolis, attributed to the ancient Judean kingdom. The mount has been used as a Jewish cemetery for over 3,000 years and holds approximately 150,000 graves, making it central in the tradition of Jewish cemeteries.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

15. فبة الخلیلی

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The Dome of al-Khalili or the Hebronite is a small domed-building located in the central platform of the Temple Mount, north of the Dome of the Rock in the Old City of Jerusalem. The building is made of bricks which are currently tarnished. The Dome of al-Khalili was built in the early 18th century during Ottoman rule of Palestine in dedication to Shaykh Muhammad al-Khalili, a scholar of fiqh who died in 1734.

Wikipedia (EN)

16. Dome Of The Chain • כיפת השרשרת • قبة السلسلة

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Dome of the Chain is an Islamic free-standing domed building located adjacently east of the Dome of the Rock in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is one of many small buildings that can be found scattered around the Temple Mount. Its exact historical use and significance are under scholarly debate. Erected in 691-92 CE, the Dome of the Chain is one of the oldest surviving structures on the Temple Mount.

Wikipedia (EN)

17. ארבעת בתי הכנסת הספרדיים

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ארבעת בתי הכנסת הספרדיים Survey of Palestine / Public domain

The Four Sephardic Synagogues are located in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem. They form a complex of four adjoining synagogues. The first three synagogues were built at different periods to accommodate the religious needs of the Sephardic community, each congregation practising a different rite; later the courtyard was converted into what became known as the "middle synagogue".

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18. הר ציון

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Mount Zion is a hill in Jerusalem, located just outside the walls of the Old City. The term Mount Zion has been used in the Hebrew Bible first for the City of David and later for the Temple Mount, but its meaning has shifted and it is now used as the name of ancient Jerusalem's Western Hill. In a wider sense, the term is also used for the entire Land of Israel.

Wikipedia (EN)

19. Tomb of the Virgin Mary

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Church of the Sepulchre of Saint Mary, also Tomb of the Virgin Mary, is a Christian tomb in the Kidron Valley – at the foot of Mount of Olives, in Jerusalem – believed by Eastern Christians to be the burial place of Mary, the mother of Jesus. The Status Quo, a 250-year old understanding between religious communities, applies to the site.

Wikipedia (EN), Mapillary, Website

20. Chapelle Saint Vincent de Paul

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Chapelle Saint Vincent de Paul ד"ר אבישי טייכר / CC BY 2.5

The St. Vincent de Paul Chapel is a Catholic chapel that serves the Hospice of St. Vincent de Paul in Jerusalem. It is dedicated to the founder of the Daughters of Charity who also run a hospital and an adjoining nursery. This is one of the largest Catholic churches in the city. The sisters are present in the Holy Land since 1884.

Wikipedia (EN)

21. דגם ירושלים בימי בית שני

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דגם ירושלים בימי בית שני Berthold Werner / Public domain

The Holyland Model of Jerusalem, also known as Model of Jerusalem at the end of the Second Temple period is a 1:50 scale model of the city of Jerusalem in the late Second Temple period. The model was moved from its original location at the Holyland Hotel in Bayit VeGan, Jerusalem, to a new site at the Israel Museum in June 2006.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

22. ברכת השילוח

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The term Pool of Siloam refers to a number of rock-cut pools on the southern slope of the Wadi Hilweh, considered by some archaeologists to be the original site of Jerusalem, located outside the walls of the Old City to the southeast. The pools were fed by the waters of the Gihon Spring, carried there by the Siloam Tunnel.

Wikipedia (EN), Description

23. וירי גלילאי

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The Viri Galilaei Church is a Greek Orthodox church located at the northern peak of the Mount of Olives in East Jerusalem. It is part of the Monastery of Little Galilee on the Mount of Olives, which belongs to the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem, and serves as the private residence of the Patriarch.

Wikipedia (EN)

24. קבר יאסון

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קבר יאסון Neta / Attribution

Jason's Tomb is a rock-cut tomb dating to the first century BCE in the Hasmonean period, discovered in the Rehavia neighborhood in Jerusalem, Israel. It has been identified as the burial site of a certain Jason, possibly a naval commander, based on the charcoal drawing of two warships discovered in the cave.

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25. שער האשפות

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שער האשפות Berthold Werner / Public domain

The Dung Gate or Silwan Gate, also known as the Mughrabi Gate, is one of the Gates of the Old City of Jerusalem. It was built as a small postern gate in the 16th century by the Ottomans, first widened for vehicular traffic in 1952 by the Jordanians, and again in 1985 by the Israeli authorities.

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26. Ratisbonne Monastery

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Ratisbonne Monastery Fade to Black / Public domain

Ratisbonne Monastery is a monastery in the Rehavia neighborhood of Jerusalem, Israel, established by Marie-Alphonse Ratisbonne, a French convert from Judaism. Work on the building, designed by the French architect M. Daumat, began in 1874 on a barren hill, now in the center of West Jerusalem.

Wikipedia (EN)

27. Dominus Flevit Church

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Dominus Flevit is a Roman Catholic church on the Mount of Olives, opposite the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem. During construction of the sanctuary, archaeologists uncovered artifacts dating back to the Canaanite period, as well as tombs from the Second Temple and Byzantine eras.

Wikipedia (EN), Mapillary, Website

28. قبة النبي

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The Dome of the Prophet, also known as the Dome of the Messenger and the Dome of Muhammed is a free-standing dome in the northern Temple Mount, in Jerusalem. It is located on the northwest part of the elevated platform where the Dome of the Rock stands.

Wikipedia (EN)

29. קבר זכריה

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The Tomb of Zechariah is an ancient stone monument adjacent to the Tomb of Benei Hezir that is considered in Jewish tradition to be the tomb of Zechariah ben Jehoiada. It is a few meters from the Tomb of Absalom and adjacent to the Tomb of Benei Hezir.

Wikipedia (EN)

30. בית כנסת עדס

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בית כנסת עדס dr. avishai teicher User:Avi1111 / Public domain

The Ades Synagogue,, also known as the Great Synagogue Ades of the Glorious Aleppo Community, located in Jerusalem's Nachlaot neighborhood, was established by Syrian immigrants in 1901. It is considered to be the center of Syrian Hazzanut in Israel.

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31. חדר הסעודה האחרונה

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The Cenacle, also known as the Upper Room, is a room in Mount Zion in Jerusalem, just outside the Old City walls, traditionally held to be the site of the Last Supper, the final meal that, in the Gospel accounts, Jesus held with the apostles.

Wikipedia (EN), Mapillary

32. קבר אחים חללי הרובע היהודי

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The Tomb of the Harley Brothers in the Ghetto is a brother's tomb on the Mount of Olives, adjacent to the Tomb of the Prophet, and in Jerusalem, the tomb contains 48 Harley of the Ghetto who were killed in the War of Independence.

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33. בית הכנסת תפארת ישראל

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בית הכנסת תפארת ישראל Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Tiferet Yisrael Synagogue, most often spelled Tiferet Israel, also known as the Nisan Bak Shul, after its co-founder, Nisan Bak was a prominent synagogue between 1872 and 1948 in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem.

Wikipedia (EN)

34. ישבת פורת יוסף

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ישבת פורת יוסף The original uploader was Chesdovi at English Wikipedia. at 13:14 on 21 September, 2006; Size: 2681×1365× (908932 bytes) / Public domain

Porat Yosef Yeshiva is a Sephardic yeshiva in Jerusalem, with locations in both the Old City and the Geula neighborhood. The name Porat Yosef means "Joseph is a fruitful tree" after the biblical verse Genesis 49:22.

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35. בית הכנסת הגדול

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בית הכנסת הגדול Ariel Horowitz / CC BY 2.5

The Great Synagogue of Jerusalem,, is located at 56 King George Street, Jerusalem, Israel. Rabbi Zalman Druck was the spiritual leader from the synagogue's establishment until his death on 11 December 2009.

Wikipedia (EN)

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