42 Sights in Dublin, Ireland (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Dublin, Ireland. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 42 sights are available in Dublin, Ireland.

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1. Sir John Gray Knt MD JP

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Sir John Gray Knt MD JP The original uploader was GrahamH at English Wikipedia. / CC BY-SA 2.5

Sir John Gray JP, sometimes spelled John Grey, was an Irish physician, surgeon, newspaper proprietor, journalist and politician. Gray was active both in municipal and national government for much of his life, and had nationalist ideals – which he expressed as owner of the Freeman's Journal, chairman of the Dublin Corporation Water Works Committee between 1863 and 1875, and Member of Parliament in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland for Kilkenny city from 1865 until his death. He was a supporter of Daniel O'Connell, and later of Charles Stewart Parnell, and advocated a repeal of the Act of Union. Through his offices with Dublin Corporation, the Vartry Reservoir water supply works were completed, introducing a fresh water supply to Dublin city and suburbs. He died at Bath in England on 9 April 1875. Shortly after his death, his contributions to the provision of the water supply, and the beneficial impact this had to conditions of public health in Dublin, were recognised in a memorial statue on O'Connell Street.

Wikipedia (EN)

2. Daniel O'Connell

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Daniel O'Connell Bernard Mulrenin / Public domain

Daniel O'Connell, hailed in his time as The Liberator, was the acknowledged political leader of Ireland's Roman Catholic majority in the first half of the 19th century. His mobilisation of Catholic Ireland through to the poorest class of tenant farmer helped secure Catholic emancipation in 1829 and allowed him to take a seat in the United Kingdom Parliament to which he had twice been elected. At Westminster O'Connell championed liberal and reform causes but failed in his declared objective for Ireland: the restoration of a separate Irish Parliament through repeal of the 1800 Act of Union. Against the background of a growing agrarian crisis and, in his final years, of the Great Irish Famine, O'Connell contended with dissension at home. Criticism of his political compromises and system of patronage led to a split in the national movement he had singularly led.

Wikipedia (EN)

3. Book of Kells

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Book of Kells Abbey of Kells / Public domain

The Book of Kells is an illuminated manuscript Gospel book in Latin, containing the four Gospels of the New Testament together with various prefatory texts and tables. It was created in a Columban monastery in either Ireland, Scotland or England, and may have had contributions from various Columban institutions from each of these areas. It is believed to have been created c. 800 AD. The text of the Gospels is largely drawn from the Vulgate, although it also includes several passages drawn from the earlier versions of the Bible known as the Vetus Latina. It is a masterwork of Western calligraphy and represents the pinnacle of Insular illumination. The manuscript takes its name from the Abbey of Kells, County Meath, which was its home for centuries.

Wikipedia (EN)

4. St Stephen's Green

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St Stephen's Green Dronepicr (edited by King of Hearts) Edit corrects CA and sharpens image; / CC BY 3.0

St Stephen's Green is a garden square and public park located in the city centre of Dublin, Ireland. The current landscape of the park was designed by William Sheppard. It was officially re-opened to the public on Tuesday, 27 July 1880 by Lord Ardilaun. The square is adjacent to one of Dublin's main shopping streets, Grafton Street, and to a shopping centre named after it, while on its surrounding streets are the offices of a number of public bodies as well as a stop on one of Dublin's Luas tram lines. It is often informally called Stephen's Green. At 22 acres (8.9 ha), it is the largest of the parks in Dublin's main Georgian garden squares. Others include nearby Merrion Square and Fitzwilliam Square.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

5. Stone of Remembrance

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Stone of Remembrance Vignaccia76 / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The Stone of Remembrance is a standardised design for war memorials that was designed in 1917 by the British architect Sir Edwin Lutyens for the Imperial War Graves Commission (IWGC). It was designed to commemorate the dead of World War I, to be used in IWGC war cemeteries containing 1,000 or more graves, or at memorial sites commemorating more than 1,000 war dead. Hundreds were erected following World War I, and it has since been used in cemeteries containing the Commonwealth dead of World War II as well. It is intended to commemorate those "of all faiths and none", and has been described as one of Lutyens' "most important and powerful works", with a "brooding, sentinel-like presence wherever used".

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6. Spanish Civil War International Brigade

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The International Brigades were military units set up by the Communist International to assist the Popular Front government of the Second Spanish Republic during the Spanish Civil War. The organization existed for two years, from 1936 until 1938. It is estimated that during the entire war, between 40,000 and 59,000 members served in the International Brigades, including 15,000 who died in combat. Beyond the Spanish Civil War, International Brigades is also sometimes used interchangeably with the term foreign legion in reference to military units comprising foreigners who volunteer to fight in the military of another state, often in times of war.

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7. Magazine Fort

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The Magazine Fort is a bastion fort and magazine located within the Phoenix Park, in Dublin, Ireland. Built in 1735, it was occupied by British Armed Forces until 1922 when it was turned over to the Irish Defence Forces after the Anglo-Irish Treaty. The Irish Army continued to operate the site as an ammunition store through the mid-20th century. It was fully demilitarised by the 1980s. The fort is now managed by the Office of Public Works. As of 2015, it was in a derelict state and not open to the public, however some repairs were undertaken and the site partially opened for "limited guided tours" from 2016.

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8. 1974 Dublin and Monaghan Bombings Memorial

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The Dublin and Monaghan bombings of 17 May 1974 were a series of co-ordinated bombings in counties Dublin and Monaghan, Ireland. Three bombs exploded in Dublin during the evening rush hour and a fourth exploded in Monaghan almost ninety minutes later. They killed 33 civilians and a full-term unborn child, and injured almost 300. The bombings were the deadliest attack of the conflict known as the Troubles, and the deadliest attack in the Republic's history. Most of the victims were young women, although the ages of the dead ranged from pre-born up to 80 years.

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9. Universal Links on Human Rights

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Universal Links on Human Rights is a memorial sculpture located in Dublin, Ireland, on the traffic island at the junction of Amiens Street, Beresford Place, and Memorial Road, close to Busáras and The Customs House. It is a sphere of welded interlinked chains and bars, 260 cm in diameter, housing an eternal flame in its center, powered by natural gas from the Kinsale Head gas field. It was commissioned by Amnesty International in 1995 and designed by Tony O'Malley. It represents the jails holding prisoners of conscience.

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10. Humphrey Lloyd FRS

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Humphrey Lloyd FRS Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Humphrey Lloyd FRS FRSE MRIA (1800–1881) was an Irish physicist. He was Erasmus Smith's Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy at Trinity College Dublin (1831-1843) and much later Provost (1867–1881). Lloyd is known for experimentally verifying conical refraction, a theoretical prediction made by William Rowan Hamilton about the way light is bent when travelling through a biaxial crystal. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society, and President of both the British Association and the Royal Irish Academy.

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11. Jim Larkin 1876-1947

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Jim Larkin 1876-1947 Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

James Larkin, sometimes known as Jim Larkin or Big Jim, was an Irish republican, socialist and trade union leader. He was one of the founders of the Irish Labour Party along with James Connolly and William O'Brien, and later the founder of the Irish Worker League, as well as the Irish Transport and General Workers' Union (ITGWU) and the Workers' Union of Ireland. Along with Connolly and Jack White, he was also a founder of the Irish Citizen Army. Larkin was a leading figure in the Syndicalist movement.

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12. Stella Maris - Star of the Sea

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The Bull Wall, or North Bull Wall, at the Port of Dublin, extending from the estuary of the River Tolka and the district of Clontarf out nearly 3 km into Dublin Bay, is one of the two defining sea walls of the port, and faces the earlier-constructed Great South Wall. It has one of a trio of port lighthouses at the end of its extension breakwater, and a statue of Realt na Mara partway along, and was responsible for the formation of North Bull Island with its nearly 5 km of beach.

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13. Wolfe Tone Square

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Wolfe Tone Square William Murphy from Dublin, Ireland / CC BY-SA 2.0

Wolfe Tone Park, also known as Wolfe Tone Square, is a public space in Dublin, Ireland. Named for Theobald Wolfe Tone (1763–1798), the park is the site of a graveyard that was attached to St. Mary's Church. The graveyard was deconsecrated in 1966 and laid out as a green park. In 1998, Dublin City Council held an international competition to redesign the park, which was won by Peter Cody of Boyd Cody Architects. The park in its current form was completed in 2001.

Wikipedia (EN)

14. Iveagh Gardens

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The Iveagh Gardens is a public park located between Clonmel Street and Upper Hatch Street, near the National Concert Hall in Dublin, Ireland. It is a national, as opposed to a municipal park, and designated as a National Historic Property. The gardens are almost completely surrounded by buildings making them less noticeable and a little hard to find, unlike other green spaces in Dublin. This makes them one of Dublin's hidden gems.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

15. Saint Audoen's Gate

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Saint Audoen's Gate Leonard Strangways / Public domain

The walls and fortifications around Dublin were raised by the Ostmen in the 9th Century, and the majority of the cities in Ireland remained subject to incursions by native clans until the seventeenth century. The defences of Dublin would eventually fall into disrepair but continued to serve a purpose as late as 1762 when the auction of the rights to collect tolls at each of the then seven city gates raised £4,000 for the city.

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16. General Post Office

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General Post Office Copyright © 2006 Kaihsu Tai / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The General Post Office in Dublin is the headquarters of An Post, the Irish Post Office, and Dublin's principal post office. Sited in the centre of O'Connell Street, the city's main thoroughfare, it is one of Ireland's most famous buildings, not least because it served as the headquarters of the leaders of the Easter Rising. It was the last of the great Georgian public buildings erected in the capital.

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17. St Audoen's

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St Audoen's Church is the church of the parish of Saint Audoen in the Church of Ireland, located south of the River Liffey at Cornmarket in Dublin, Ireland. This was close to the centre of the medieval city. The parish is in the Diocese of Dublin and Glendalough. St Audoen's is the oldest parish church in Dublin and still used as such. There is a Roman Catholic church of the same name adjacent to it.

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18. Hungry Tree

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The Hungry Tree is a tree in the grounds of the King's Inns in Dublin, Republic of Ireland. An otherwise unremarkable specimen of the London plane, it has become known for having partially consumed a nearby park bench. It has become a tourist attraction and is frequently photographed. The Hungry Tree was the subject of a campaign by Green Party politician Ciarán Cuffe to ensure its preservation.

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19. Garden Of Remembrance

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The Garden of Remembrance is a memorial garden in Dublin dedicated to the memory of "all those who gave their lives in the cause of Irish Freedom". It is located in the northern fifth of the former Rotunda Gardens in Parnell Square, a Georgian square at the northern end of O'Connell Street. The garden was opened by Eamon de Valera during the semicentennial of the Easter Rising in 1966.

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20. Jeanie Johnston

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Jeanie Johnston Jnestorius / Public domain

Jeanie Johnston is a replica of a three masted barque that was originally built in Quebec, Canada, in 1847 by the Scottish-born shipbuilder John Munn. The replica Jeanie Johnston performs a number of functions: an ocean-going sail training vessel at sea and in port converts into a living history museum on 19th century emigration and, in the evenings, is used as a corporate event venue.

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21. St Stephen's Church

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St Stephen's Church William Murphy / CC BY-SA 2.0

Saint Stephen's Church, popularly known as The Pepper Canister, is the formal Church of Ireland chapel-of-ease for the parish of the same name in Dublin, Ireland. The church is situated on Mount Street Upper. It was begun in 1821 by John Bowden and completed by Joseph Welland after the former's death. The nickname derives from the shape of the spire, resembling a pepper canister.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

22. St Werburgh's

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St. Werburgh's Church is a Church of Ireland church building in Dublin, Ireland. The original church on this site was built in 1178, shortly after the arrival of the Anglo-Normans in the town. It was named after St. Werburgh, abbess of Ely and patron saint of Chester. The current building was constructed in 1719. It is located in Werburgh Street, close to Dublin Castle.

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23. 1913 Lockout

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1913 Lockout Joseph Cashman / PD-US

The Dublin lock-out was a major industrial dispute between approximately 20,000 workers and 300 employers which took place in Ireland's capital city of Dublin. The dispute lasted from 26 August 1913 to 18 January 1914, and is often viewed as the most severe and significant industrial dispute in Irish history. Central to the dispute was the workers' right to unionise.

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24. Temple Bar

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Temple Bar / Public domain

Temple Bar is an area on the south bank of the River Liffey in central Dublin, Ireland. The area is bounded by the Liffey to the north, Dame Street to the south, Westmoreland Street to the east and Fishamble Street to the west. It is promoted as Dublin's 'cultural quarter' and, as a centre of Dublin's city centre's nightlife, is a tourist destination.

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25. Theobald Mathew

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Theobald Mathew Thomas Kelly (fl. 1871-1874) / Public domain

Theobald Mathew was an Irish Catholic priest and teetotalist reformer, popularly known as Father Mathew. He was born at Thomastown, near Golden, County Tipperary, on 10 October 1790, to James Mathew and his wife Anne, daughter of George Whyte, of Cappaghwhyte. Of the family of the Earls Landaff, he was a kinsman of the clergyman Arnold Mathew.

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26. National Leprechaun Museum

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The National Leprechaun Museum is a privately owned museum dedicated to Irish folklore and mythology, through the oral tradition of storytelling. It is located on Jervis Street in Dublin, Ireland, since 10 March 2010. It claims to be the first leprechaun museum in the world. The Irish Times has referred to it as the "Louvre of leprechauns".

Wikipedia (EN), Website

27. Miami Showband Killings

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The Miami Showband killings was an attack on 31 July 1975 by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), a loyalist paramilitary group. It took place on the A1 road at Buskhill in County Down, Northern Ireland. Five people were killed, including three members of The Miami Showband, who were one of Ireland's most popular cabaret bands.

Wikipedia (EN)

28. National Museum of Ireland, Natural History

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National Museum of Ireland, Natural History William Murphy / CC BY-SA 2.0

The National Museum of Ireland – Natural History, sometimes called the Dead Zoo, a branch of the National Museum of Ireland, is housed on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland. The museum was built in 1856 for parts of the collection of the Royal Dublin Society and the building and collection were later passed to the State.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

29. Cúchulainn

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Cúchulainn Stephen Reid / Public domain

Cú Chulainn, sometimes known in English as Cuhullin, is a warrior hero and demigod in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology, as well as in Scottish and Manx folklore. He is believed to be an incarnation of the Irish god Lugh, who is also his father. His mother is the mortal Deichtine, sister of king Conchobar mac Nessa.

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30. Kilmainham Gaol

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Kilmainham Gaol is a former prison in Kilmainham, Dublin, Ireland. It is now a museum run by the Office of Public Works, an agency of the Government of Ireland. Many Irish revolutionaries, including the leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising, were imprisoned and executed in the prison by the orders of the UK Government.

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31. Catherine McAuley

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Catherine McAuley Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Catherine McAuley was an Irish religious sister who founded the Sisters of Mercy in 1831. The women's congregation has always been associated with teaching, especially in Ireland, where the sisters taught Catholics at a time when education was mainly reserved for members of the established Church of Ireland.

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32. Mary Aikenhead

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Mary Aikenhead unknown artist / Public domain

Mother Mary Frances Aikenhead was born in Daunt's Square off Grand Parade, Cork, Ireland. Described as one of nursing's greatest leaders, she was the founder of the Catholic religious institute, the Religious Sisters of Charity, the Sisters of Charity of Australia, and of St. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin.

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33. Sir Samuel Ferguson

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Sir Samuel Ferguson Mary Catharine Ferguson / Public domain

Sir Samuel Ferguson was an Irish poet, barrister, antiquarian, artist and public servant. He was an acclaimed 19th-century Irish poet, and his interest in Irish mythology and early Irish history can be seen as a forerunner of William Butler Yeats and the other poets of the Irish Literary Revival.

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34. Irish National War Memorial Gardens

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Irish National War Memorial Gardens Osioni / Public domain

The Irish National War Memorial Gardens is an Irish war memorial in Islandbridge, Dublin, dedicated "to the memory of the 49,400 Irish soldiers who gave their lives in the Great War, 1914–1918", out of a total of 206,000 Irishmen who served in the British forces alone during the war.

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35. Spire of Dublin

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The Spire of Dublin, alternatively titled the Monument of Light, is a large, stainless steel, pin-like monument 120 metres (390 ft) in height, located on the site of the former Nelson's Pillar and statue of William Blakeney on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland.

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36. Ludwig Wittgenstein

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Ludwig Wittgenstein Clara Sjögren / Public domain

Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein was an Austrian-British philosopher who worked primarily in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language. He is considered by some to be the greatest philosopher of the 20th century.

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37. Famine Memorial

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Famine Memorial No machine-readable author provided. Sebb assumed (based on copyright claims). / Public domain

The Famine Memorial, officially titled Famine, is a memorial in Dublin, Ireland. The memorial, which stands on Customs House Quay, is in remembrance of the Great Famine (1845-1849), which saw the population of the country halved through death and emigration.

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38. Ha'penny Bridge

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Ha'penny Bridge / Public domain

The Ha'penny Bridge, known later for a time as the Penny Ha'penny Bridge, and officially the Liffey Bridge, is a pedestrian bridge built in May 1816 over the River Liffey in Dublin, Ireland. Made of cast iron, the bridge was cast in Shropshire, England.

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39. Clondalkin Round Tower

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Clondalkin Round Tower is an Irish round tower or cloigtheach founded by Saint Mochua, also known as Saint Cronan, and located in Clondalkin, South Dublin, Ireland. It is now a National Monument of Ireland. It's also become a museum that houses a cafe.

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40. Saint Mary's Pro-Cathedral

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St Mary's Church, known also as St Mary's Pro-Cathedral or simply the Pro-Cathedral, the Chapel in Marlborough Street or the Pro, is a pro-cathedral and is the episcopal seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Dublin and Primate of Ireland.

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41. Irish Jewish Museum

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The Irish Jewish Museum is a small museum located in the once highly Jewish populated area of Portobello, around the South Circular Road, Dublin 8, dedicated to the history of the Irish Jewish community.

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42. Jonathan Swift

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Jonathan Swift Charles Jervas / Public domain

Jonathan Swift was an Anglo-Irish satirist, author, essayist, political pamphleteer, poet, and Anglican cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, hence his common sobriquet, "Dean Swift".

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Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.