55 Sights in Athens, Greece (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Athens, Greece. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 55 sights are available in Athens, Greece.

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1. Πολεμικό Μουσείο

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The Athens War Museum, established on July 18, 1975, is the museum of the Greek Armed Forces. Its purpose is the exhibition of weapon artifacts and the relevant research in the history of war. It covers the history of war in all ages. The museums' collections include the collection of the Greek Army, with artifacts from other civilizations such as Ancient China and Ancient Japan. In 1964, the Hellenic State decided to found the War Museum, wishing to honor all those who fought for Greece and its freedom. The design of the museum was undertaken by a team of distinguished scientists, headed by Professor Thoukidides Valentis of the National Technical University of Athens (N. T. U. A). On July 18, 1975, the President of the Hellenic Republic H. E. Constantine Tsatsos and the Minister of National Defense Evangelos Averoff-Tositsas inaugurated the museum. Its various activities include the publication of books, the establishment and maintenance of monuments and memorials and the aid to services and agencies all over Greece. The Museum's exhibition areas are distributed over four levels (floors) and present images of Greek history from antiquity to the present. The museum's centerpieces are weaponry from wars in which Greece was involved.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

2. Άγιοι Ανάργυροι Κολοκύνθη

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Saints Anargyri is a medieval church, in the Plaka district, in Athens, which is located on the northern footsteps of the Acropolis, on the contribution of Rectaniou and Erechtheus streets. Its alternative name as Kolokynthos is associated with the Kolokimnthi family, Athenian family, which is allegedly the owner of the monastery's area during the 17th century. From the 18th century until today, the site has been part of the Patriarchate of Jerusalem and is a metochi, while, in the past, the place of residence of Exarchos, the Holy Sepulcher. It was erected during the 17th century, initially functioning as the Catholic Monastery, which included it. It is a single -aisled arched basilica with a cylindrical dome that was exclusively formed in Athens during the Ottoman period of domination, influenced by the Ottoman public buildings. It is built at the site of Aphrodite's earlier church, as well as, according to tradition, on graves of members of the Paleologian family. In this temple, the Holy Light of Resurrection reaches first in Greece by Jerusalem. The day before becoming a magnificent Epitaph on the streets of the area.

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3. Μνημείο Λυσικράτους

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Μνημείο Λυσικράτους User:Greenshed / Public domain

The Lysikratus monument, also known as the "Diogenes Lantern", is a stone -built stone building, the best surviving sponsorship of antiquity. It is located in Athens, on the ancient Tripods Road and was built by Lysikratis in 335-334 BC. In order to support and highlight an important object at its top: the bronze tripod given to him as a prize for his role as a sponsor of the winning play in the latest dramatic struggles. The sponsors were wealthy citizens who, at their expense, took over the formation of the dance, that is, the group of people who participated in plays and official ceremonies. The bronze tripod was the first prize of the theatrical events and was awarded to the sponsor of the dramatic work. The tripods were assumed to the sanctuary of Dionysus or placed on the neighboring tripod road. In order to expose themselves in a more magnificent way, the tripods sometimes entered a high basis, which could be in the form of a column, or even a naisk -shaped monument, such as that of Lysikratos.

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4. Μουσείο Μπενάκη

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The Benaki Museum, established and endowed in 1930 by Antonis Benakis in memory of his father Emmanuel Benakis, is housed in the Benakis family mansion in downtown Athens, Greece. The museum houses Greek works of art from the prehistorical to the modern times, an extensive collection of Asian art, hosts periodic exhibitions and maintains a state-of-the-art restoration and conservation workshop. Although the museum initially housed a collection that included Islamic art, Chinese porcelain and exhibits on toys, its 2000 re-opening led to the creation of satellite museums that focused on specific collections, allowing the main museum to focus on Greek culture over the span of the country's history. This Museum in Athens houses over 100,000 artifacts from Greek history and showcases the many eras, civilizations and cultures which have influenced the development of Greece. Spread over a number of locations, the museum ranks among Greece’s foremost cultural institutions.

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5. Λόφος Ελικώνας

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Helicon or Alepotrypa is a low hill of Athens, located in Kypseli district, north of Kypseli Square and on the borders with the Municipality of Galatsi. It is located east of Patision Avenue, at the end of Amorgos and Anafi streets. It is a small hill at an altitude of 184 meters, which occupies an area of ​​about 140 acres. It is surrounded by the streets of Travllandoni, Amorgos, Megisti, Astypalaia, Harmony and Helicos from which the hill has been named. In the past, the ownership quarries of the Kouroussi brothers worked. Since 1934 he has been declared a reforest. In the late 1980s it was built on part of the youth hill that includes sports facilities, located by the Athenian football team. Underground from the hill will cross the Metro Line 4 and near the hill, at the park at the intersection of Hopf Streets, Parnithos and Agia Glykeria, will be the Helicic Metro Station, which will have the name of the hill.

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6. Σωκράτης

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Σωκράτης
Copy of Lysippos (?)
/ CC BY-SA 2.5

Socrates was a Greek philosopher from Athens who is credited as the founder of Western philosophy and among the first moral philosophers of the ethical tradition of thought. An enigmatic figure, Socrates authored no texts and is known mainly through the posthumous accounts of classical writers, particularly his students Plato and Xenophon. These accounts are written as dialogues, in which Socrates and his interlocutors examine a subject in the style of question and answer; they gave rise to the Socratic dialogue literary genre. Contradictory accounts of Socrates make a reconstruction of his philosophy nearly impossible, a situation known as the Socratic problem. Socrates was a polarizing figure in Athenian society. In 399 BC, he was accused of impiety and corrupting the youth. After a trial that lasted a day, he was sentenced to death. He spent his last day in prison, refusing offers to help him escape.

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7. Χοσέ Μαρτί

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Χοσέ Μαρτί Cuba. Secretaría de Instrucción Pública y Bellas Artes. / CC0

José Julián Martí Pérez was a Cuban nationalist, poet, philosopher, essayist, journalist, translator, professor, and publisher, who is considered a Cuban national hero because of his role in the liberation of his country from Spain. He was also an important figure in Latin American literature. He was very politically active and is considered an important philosopher and political theorist. Through his writings and political activity, he became a symbol of Cuba's bid for independence from the Spanish Empire in the 19th century, and is referred to as the "Apostle of Cuban Independence". From adolescence, he dedicated his life to the promotion of liberty, political independence for Cuba, and intellectual independence for all Spanish Americans; his death was used as a cry for Cuban independence from Spain by both the Cuban revolutionaries and those Cubans previously reluctant to start a revolt.

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8. Επιγραφικό μουσείο

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Επιγραφικό μουσείο Hoverfish / Public domain

The Epigraphical Museum of Athens, Greece, is unique in Greece and the largest of its kind in the world. Its collection comprises 14,078, mostly Greek, inscriptions, which cover the period from early historical times to the Late Roman period, primarily in Greece. It is situated in the south wing of the National Archaeological Museum of Athens. It comprises an internal and external courtyard (atrium), a lobby, eleven rooms, a large hypostyle Pi-shaped corridor, a gallery, offices, a laboratory for the conservation of inscribed stone monuments and lavatories. Only the courtyards, lobby and four rooms are open to the public, while the rest is reserved for researchers. A full photographic archive of the collection is being assembled for future visitors.

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9. Ναός του Ολυμπίου Διός

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Ναός του Ολυμπίου Διός Jean-Pierre Dalbéra from Paris, France / CC BY 2.0

The Temple of Olympian Zeus, also known as the Olympieion or Columns of the Olympian Zeus, is a former colossal temple at the center of the Greek capital Athens. It was dedicated to "Olympian" Zeus, a name originating from his position as head of the Olympian gods. Construction began in the 6th century BC during the rule of the Athenian tyrants, who envisaged building the greatest temple in the ancient world, but it was not completed until the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD, some 638 years after the project had begun. During the Roman period the temple, which included 104 colossal columns, was renowned as the largest temple in Greece and housed one of the largest cult statues in the ancient world.

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10. Άγιος Γεώργιος

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Άγιος Γεώργιος Křžut / Public domain

Holy Potato is a medieval church in steam, which is at the top of the prairie. In this regard, I would like to emphasize that we must act at the European level to ensure that action is taken at the European level. What was there initially, we know, was the "pause and pause grave". "Our goal is to ensure that our citizens can contribute at the European level." When the first temple was destroyed, it built a new monastery, a unicorn, a royal chapel, on the same basis, for the Holy Potato. There is a passage on the floor indicating that St. George's Church was established by Athens Veside Metropolis (1782-1785). Later the temple was expanded by adding two churches, the Prophet's Saints and the Saints' Dome.

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11. Μουσείο Μαρίκας Κοτοπούλη

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The Marika Kotopouli Museum is a modern art museum in Zografou, Athens, Greece. The building housing the museum was built by the famous Greek theater actress Marika Kotopouli (1887–1954) as her holiday home in 1926. During the Second World War, the house was requisitioned by the Germans and after the war it housed the local Police Station. The Zographou Municipality with support of the Association of Greek Actors restored the building with its distinctive architecture and beautiful interiors. In 1990, it opened to the public as a museum of modern art. It hosts various interim art exhibitions as well as the permanent collection of Konstantinos Ioannides.

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12. Θέατρο του Διονύσου

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The Theatre of Dionysus is an ancient Greek theatre in Athens. It is built on the south slope of the Acropolis hill, originally part of the sanctuary of Dionysus Eleuthereus. The first orchestra terrace was constructed on the site around the mid- to late-sixth century BC, where it hosted the City Dionysia. The theatre reached its fullest extent in the fourth century BC under the epistates of Lycurgus when it would have had a capacity of up to 17,000, and was in continuous use down to the Roman period. The theatre then fell into decay in the Byzantine era and was not identified, excavated and restored to its current condition until the nineteenth century.

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13. Περικλής

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Περικλής
Copy of Kresilas
/ Public domain

Pericles was a Greek politician and general during the Golden Age of Athens. He was prominent and influential in Athenian politics, particularly between the Greco-Persian Wars and the Peloponnesian War, and was acclaimed by Thucydides, a contemporary historian, as "the first citizen of Athens". Pericles turned the Delian League into an Athenian empire and led his countrymen during the first two years of the Peloponnesian War. The period during which he led Athens, roughly from 461 to 429 BC, is sometimes known as the "Age of Pericles", but the period thus denoted can include times as early as the Persian Wars or as late as the following century.

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14. Άρειος Πάγος

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The Areopagus is a prominent rock outcropping located northwest of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. Its English name is the Late Latin composite form of the Greek name Areios Pagos, translated "Hill of Ares". The name Areopagus also referred, in classical times, to the Athenian governing council, later restricted to the Athenian judicial council or court that tried cases of deliberate homicide, wounding and religious matters, as well as cases involving arson of olive trees, because they convened in this location. The war god Ares was supposed to have been tried by the other gods on the Areopagus for the murder of Poseidon's son Halirrhothius.

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15. Παλαιό Μουσείο της Ακρόπολης

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Παλαιό Μουσείο της Ακρόπολης
Ricardo André Frantz (User:Tetraktys)
/ CC BY-SA 3.0

The Old Acropolis Museum was an archaeological museum located in Athens, Greece on the archeological site of Acropolis. It is built in a niche at the eastern edge of the rock and most of it lies beneath the level of the hilltop, making it largely invisible. It was considered one of the major archaeological museums in Athens. Due to its limited size, the Greek government decided in the late 1980s to build a new museum. The New Acropolis Museum is now built at the foot of the Acropolis. In June 2007 the old museum closed its doors so that its antiquities could be moved to their new home, which opened on 20 June 2009.

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16. Ευάγγελος Ζάππας

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Ευάγγελος Ζάππας Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Evangelis or Evangelos Zappas was a Greek patriot, philanthropist and businessman who spent most of his life in Romania. He is recognized today as one of the founders of the modern Olympic Games, which were held in 1859, 1870, 1875, and 1888 and preceded the Olympic Games that came under the auspices of the International Olympic Committee. These Games, known at the time simply as Olympics, came before the founding of the International Olympic Committee itself. The legacy of Evangelis Zappas, as well as the legacy of his cousin Konstantinos Zappas, was also used to fund the Olympic Games of 1896.

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17. Νομισματικό Μουσείο

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The Numismatic Museum of Athens is one of the most important museums in Greece and it houses a collection of over 500,000 coins, medals, gems, weights, stamps and related artefacts from 1400BC to modern times. The collection constitutes one of the richest in the world, paralleled by those of the British Museum in London, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, the Bode Museum in Berlin, and the American Numismatic Society in New York. The museum itself is housed in the mansion of the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann, formally known as Iliou Melathron.

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18. Ιωάννης Μακρυγιάννης

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Ιωάννης Μακρυγιάννης Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Yannis Makriyannis, born Ioannis Triantaphyllou, was a Greek merchant, military officer, politician and author, best known today for his Memoirs. Starting from humble origins, he joined the Greek struggle for independence, achieving the rank of general and leading his men to notable victories, most notably the successful defence of Nafplio in the Battle of the Lerna Mills. Following Greek independence, he had a tumultuous public career, playing a prominent part in the granting of the first Constitution of the Kingdom of Greece and later being sentenced to death and pardoned.

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19. Άγιος Γεώργιος Καρύτσης

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Nuts or nuts of the Holy Grail are the Holy Grail of Christianity. The original medieval temples were destroyed during the revolution in 1821 and rebuilt on opium. It then reconstructed Hykhorzoglou's design in a broader form in 1845-1849. He didn't keep any traces of the old temple. The architecture of the temple today is Greek-Byzantine and features an obvious central pillar made of gray marble with a white code at the top. In the circumstances, the Commission was of the view that, in the circumstances, the Commission should take this into account in its proposals.

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20. Βυζαντινό και Χριστιανικό Μουσείο

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Βυζαντινό και Χριστιανικό Μουσείο G.dallorto / Attribution

The Byzantine and Christian Museum is situated at Vassilissis Sofias Avenue in Athens, Greece. It was founded in 1914, and houses more than 25,000 exhibits with rare collections of pictures, scriptures, frescoes, pottery, fabrics, manuscripts, and copies of artifacts from the 3rd century AD to the Late Middle Ages. It is one of the most important museums in the world in Byzantine Art. In June 2004, in time for its 90th anniversary and the 2004 Athens Olympics, the museum reopened to the public after an extensive renovation and the addition of another wing.

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21. Άγαλμα Ελευθερίου Βενιζέλου

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Άγαλμα Ελευθερίου Βενιζέλου Photoprint copyrighted by Harris & Ewing (No known restrictions on publication) / Public domain

Eleftherios Kyriakou Venizelos was a Greek statesman and a prominent leader of the Greek national liberation movement. He is noted for his contribution to the expansion of Greece and promotion of liberal-democratic policies. As leader of the Liberal Party, he was elected eight times as Prime Minister of Greece, serving from 1910 to 1920 and from 1928 to 1933. Venizelos had such profound influence on the internal and external affairs of Greece that he is credited with being "The Maker of Modern Greece", and is still widely known as the "Ethnarch".

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22. Λόφος Νυμφών

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The Nymph hill or an Observatory hill is a rocky hill of Athens opposite the Temple of Hephaestus. It is associated with the adjacent hills of Philopappus and Pnika. At the top there is the building of the National Observatory of Athens, which has given its name to the hill and the adjacent district. Apart from the district of the Observatory, there are also the districts of Thissio and Petralona around the hill, while the hill is separated from the archaeological site of Thissio and the Ancient Agora from Apostolou Pavlou Street.

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23. Βιβλιοθήκη τού Πανταίνου

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The Library of Pantinos was a building in ancient Athens. It was located on the southeast edge of the ancient market of Athens, south of the Antalos arcade, to the left of Panathinai Street. It was built by the Athenian philosopher Titus Flavius always between 98 and 102 AD, at the time of the Roman Emperor Trajan. The Library building was dedicated to Athena Chiefs, Trajan himself and the people of Athens, according to an inscription on the lintel of the main entrance and preserved integrated into the Late Roman Wall.

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24. Στοά Ευμένους

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The Stoa of Eumenes was a Hellenistic colonnade built on the South slope of the Acropolis, Athens and which lay between the Theater of Dionysus and the Odeon of Herodes Atticus The gallery was donated to the city of Athens by the king of Pergamon, Eumenes II, around 160 BC. Vitruvius makes reference to the building when speaking about the purpose of stoai erected near theatres that served as a refuge for the spectators in inclement weather conditions or as stores for theatre props.

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25. Στρατηγός Χοσέ ντε Σαν Μαρτίν

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Στρατηγός Χοσέ ντε Σαν Μαρτίν / Public domain

José Francisco de San Martín y Matorras, known simply as José de San Martín or the Liberator of Argentina, Chile and Peru, was an Argentine general and the primary leader of the southern and central parts of South America's successful struggle for independence from the Spanish Empire who served as the Protector of Peru. Born in Yapeyú, Corrientes, in modern-day Argentina, he left the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata at the early age of seven to study in Málaga, Spain.

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26. Ιωάννης Καποδίστριας

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Ιωάννης Καποδίστριας Thomas Lawrence / Public domain

Count Ioannis Antonios Kapodistrias, sometimes anglicized as John Capodistrias, was a Greek statesman who served as the Foreign Minister of the Russian Empire and was one of the most distinguished politicians and diplomats of Europe. After a long and distinguished career in European politics and diplomacy he was elected as the first head of state of independent Greece (1827–31). He is considered the founder of the modern Greek state, and the architect of Greek independence.

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27. Αδαμάντιος Κοραής

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Αδαμάντιος Κοραής
{{Creator:}}
/ Public domain

Adamantios Korais or Koraïs was a Greek scholar credited with laying the foundations of Modern Greek literature and a major figure in the Greek Enlightenment. His activities paved the way for the Greek War of Independence and the emergence of a purified form of the Greek language, known as Katharevousa. Encyclopædia Britannica asserts that "his influence on the modern Greek language and culture has been compared to that of Dante on Italian and Martin Luther on German".

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28. Αλεξάντερ Φλέμινγκ

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Αλεξάντερ Φλέμινγκ Official photographer / Public domain

Sir Alexander Fleming was a Scottish physician and microbiologist, best known for discovering the world's first broadly effective antibiotic substance, which he named penicillin. His discovery in 1928 of what was later named benzylpenicillin from the mould Penicillium rubens is described as the "single greatest victory ever achieved over disease." For this discovery, he shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Howard Florey and Ernst Boris Chain.

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29. Βασιλιάς Κωνσταντίνος Α'

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Constantine I was King of Greece from 18 March 1913 to 11 June 1917 and from 19 December 1920 to 27 September 1922. He was commander-in-chief of the Hellenic Army during the unsuccessful Greco-Turkish War of 1897 and led the Greek forces during the successful Balkan Wars of 1912–1913, in which Greece expanded to include Thessaloniki, doubling in area and population. He succeeded to the throne of Greece on 18 March 1913, following his father's assassination.

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30. Ναός Ηφαίστου

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Ναός Ηφαίστου Storeye / Public domain

The Temple of Hephaestus or Hephaisteion, is a well-preserved Greek temple dedicated to Hephaestus; it remains standing largely intact today. It is a Doric peripteral temple, and is located at the north-west side of the Agora of Athens, on top of the Agoraios Kolonos hill. From the 7th century until 1834, it served as the Greek Orthodox church of Saint George Akamates. The building's condition has been maintained due to its history of varied use.

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31. Ταράς Σεβτσένκο

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Ταράς Σεβτσένκο Andrey Denyer / Public domain

Taras Hryhorovych Shevchenko, also known as Kobzar Taras, or simply Kobzar, was a Ukrainian poet, writer, artist, public and political figure, folklorist and ethnographer. His literary heritage is regarded to be the foundation of modern Ukrainian literature and, to a large extent, the modern Ukrainian language though it is different from the language of his poems. Shevchenko is also known for his many masterpieces as a painter and an illustrator.

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32. Θεόδωρος Κολοκοτρώνης

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Θεόδωρος Κολοκοτρώνης Dionysios Tsokos / Public domain

Theodoros Kolokotronis was a Greek general and the pre-eminent leader of the Greek War of Independence (1821–1829) against the Ottoman Empire. Kolokotronis's greatest success was the defeat of the Ottoman army under Mahmud Dramali Pasha at the Battle of Dervenakia in 1822. In 1825, he was appointed commander-in-chief of the Greek forces in Peloponnese. Today, Kolokotronis ranks among the most prominent figures in Greece's War of Independence.

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33. Παρθενών

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The Parthenon is a former temple on the Athenian Acropolis, Greece, dedicated to the goddess Athena, whom the people of Athens considered their patroness. Construction started in 447 BC when the Delian League was at the peak of its power. It was completed in 438 BC, although decoration of the building continued until 432 BC. It is the most important surviving building of Classical Greece, generally considered the zenith of the Doric order.

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34. Αλέξανδρος Παναγούλης

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Αλέξανδρος Παναγούλης Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Alexandros Panagoulis was a Greek politician and poet. He took an active role in the fight against the Regime of the Colonels (1967–1974) in Greece. He became famous for his attempt to assassinate dictator Georgios Papadopoulos on 13 August 1968, but also for the torture to which he was subjected during his detention. After the restoration of democracy, he was elected to the Greek parliament as a member of the Centre Union (E. K. ).

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35. Μελίνα Μερκούρη

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Μελίνα Μερκούρη Björn Roos / CC-BY-SA-3.0

Maria Amalia "Melina" Mercouri was a Greek actress, singer, activist, and politician. She came from a political family that was prominent over multiple generations. She received an Academy Award nomination and won a Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award for her performance in the film Never on Sunday (1960). Mercouri was also nominated for one Tony Award, three Golden Globes and two BAFTA Awards in her acting career.

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36. Μνημείο επωνύμων ηρώων

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The Monument of the Eponymous Heroes, located in the Ancient Agora of Athens, Greece and adjacently situated near the Metroon, was a marble podium that bore the bronze statues of the ten heroes representing the tribes of Athens. Being an important information center for the ancient Athenians, it was used as a monument where proposed legislation, decrees and announcements were posted.

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37. Μνημείο πεσόντων του Πολυτεχνείου

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Μνημείο πεσόντων του Πολυτεχνείου Unknown authorUnknown author / CC BY-SA 4.0

The Athens Polytechnic uprising occurred in November 1973 as a massive student demonstration of popular rejection of the Greek military junta of 1967–1974. It began on 14 November 1973, escalated to an open anti-junta revolt, and ended in bloodshed in the early morning of 17 November after a series of events starting with a tank crashing through the gates of the Athens Polytechnic.

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38. Μουσείο Ακρόπολης

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The Acropolis Museum is an archaeological museum focused on the findings of the archaeological site of the Acropolis of Athens. The museum was built to house every artifact found on the rock and on the surrounding slopes, from the Greek Bronze Age to Roman and Byzantine Greece. It also lies over the ruins of part of Roman and early Byzantine Athens.

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39. Λυκαβηττός

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Mount Lycabettus, also known as Lycabettos, Lykabettos or Lykavittos, is a Cretaceous limestone hill in the Greek capital Athens. At 277 meters (908 feet) above sea level, its summit is the highest point in Central Athens and pine trees cover its base. The name also refers to the residential neighbourhood immediately below the east of the hill.

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40. Γεώργιος Αβέρωφ

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Γεώργιος Αβέρωφ Pantelis Prosalentis / Public domain

George M. Averoff, alternately Jorgos Averof or Georgios Averof, was a businessman and philanthropist. He is one of the great national benefactors of Greece. Born in the town of Metsovo, Averoff moved to Alexandria while still young. He was known through most of his life for founding numerous schools in both Egypt and Greece.

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41. Μουσείο Κεραμεικού

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The Kerameikos Archaeological Museum is located in Kerameikos, Athens, Greece and was built in 1937. It houses many important early Geometric art pieces that date as far back as 860 BC. It was expanded in the 1960s by the Boehringer brothers of Boehringer Ingelheim fame. Its official address is Ermou, Athens 125, Greece.

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42. Πύλη του Αδριανού

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The Arch of Hadrian, most commonly known in Greek as Hadrian's Gate, is a monumental gateway resembling—in some respects—a Roman triumphal arch. It spanned an ancient road from the center of Athens, Greece, to the complex of structures on the eastern side of the city that included the Temple of Olympian Zeus.

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43. Γουλιέλμος Γλάδστων

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Γουλιέλμος Γλάδστων Samuel Alexander Walker / Public domain

William Ewart Gladstone was a British statesman and Liberal politician. In a career lasting over 60 years, he served for 12 years as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, spread over four terms beginning in 1868 and ending in 1894. He also served as Chancellor of the Exchequer four times, serving over 12 years.

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44. Αρρηφόριον

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Αρρηφόριον Madmedea. / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Arrephorion or House of the Arrephoroi is a building conjectured to have been on the Acropolis of Athens based on a passage in Pausanias. The discovery of the foundations of a substantial building on the north-west edge of the Acropolis has led to the identification of this structure with the Arrephorion.

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45. Εθνικό Αστεροσκοπείο Αθηνών

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The National Observatory of Athens is a research institute in Athens, Greece. Founded in 1842, it is the oldest research foundation in Greece, as it was the first scientific research institute built after Greece became independent in 1829, and one of the oldest research institutes in Southern Europe.

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46. Ψυρρή

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The small town of the town is located in the historic center of Athens and is one of the oldest areas of the town. It pervades the squares, or Heroes' squares, of the five main roads in the area: Mullite Street, Karia Kakitsky Street, Saints Street, Noble Street and Accessibility Street.

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47. Τζωρτζ Κάνινγκ

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George Canning was a British Tory statesman. He held various senior cabinet positions under numerous prime ministers, including two important terms as Foreign Secretary, finally becoming Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for the last 118 days of his life, from April to August 1827.

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48. Ελληνικό Μουσείο Αυτοκινήτου

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The Hellenic Motor Museum is a car museum in Athens. It is owned by the Theodore Charagionis Foundation and opened in March 2011. The museum is situated in central Athens near the National Archaeological Museum, on the three top floors of the Athenian Capitol shopping mall.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

49. Πνύκα

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The Pnyx is a hill in central Athens, the capital of Greece. Beginning as early as 507 BC, the Athenians gathered on the Pnyx to host their popular assemblies, thus making the hill one of the earliest and most important sites in the creation of democracy.

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50. Κωστής Παλαμάς

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Kostis Palamas was a Greek poet who wrote the words to the Olympic Hymn. He was a central figure of the Greek literary generation of the 1880s and one of the cofounders of the so-called New Athenian School along with Georgios Drosinis and Ioannis Polemis.

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51. Εθνικό Ιστορικό Μουσείο

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Εθνικό Ιστορικό Μουσείο Reinhard Dietrich / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The National Historical Museum is a historical museum in Athens. Founded in 1882, is the oldest of its kind in Greece. It is located in the Old Parliament House at Stadiou Street in Athens, which housed the Hellenic Parliament from 1875 until 1932.

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52. Θησεύς σώζων την Ιπποδάμειαν

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The sculptural complex "Theseus saving Hippodamia" is located in Viktoria Square in Athens and is a sculptural creation of great artistic value. It is considered one of the most important outdoor sculpture works of the 20th century in Athens.

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53. Άγιοι Πάντες

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Agioi Pantes is a small church of Byzantine style of the 11th century. in Ampelokipoi of Athens. It is located at 39 Tsocha Street, a short distance from the Panathinaikos stadium and the metro station "Ampelokipoi".

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54. Ιωάννης Βαρβάκης

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Ιωάννης Βαρβάκης / Public domain

Ioannis Varvakis, also known as Ivan Andreevich Varvatsi, was a Greek distinguished member of the Russian and Greek communities, national hero, member of the Filiki Eteria and benefactor of the places where he lived.

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55. Πλάτων

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Πλάτων Marie-Lan Nguyen / Public domain

Plato was a Greek philosopher born in Athens during the Classical period in Ancient Greece. He founded the Platonist school of thought and the Academy, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

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Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.