14 Sights in Würzburg, Germany (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Würzburg, Germany. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 14 sights are available in Würzburg, Germany.

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1. Sankt Stephan

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St. Stephen's Church, also known as St. Stephen's Church, has been the first long-standing Protestant church in Wurzburg since 1803. It can be traced back to the Abbey Church of St. Stephen's Benedictine Monastery, which was dissolved due to secularization. A few years ago, in 1788/89, most of the old building of the Abbey Church was demolished and a new building was built according to the plan of John Philip Geiger. The ancient building and its affiliated monastery building date back to 1014, the former monastery of St. Peter's and Paul's College, which was converted into a Benedictine monastery by Bishop Adabello in 1057. After St Stephen's relic was moved, it was named only after him, while the names of St Peter and Paul were moved to the new parish church. The monastery's buildings were desecrated after 1803 and completely destroyed and demolished in 1945. The new building accommodates the government of Lower Franconia. The church was rebuilt as a flat-roofed hall from 1949 to 1955, completed in 1952, and is now the Abbot's Church in Wurzburg. In addition to the existing YMCA, institutions such as the Rudolph-Alexander-Schroeder House, the Protestant Bookstore and the Diakonia Counseling Centre were established around the church in 1963, making the town the Protestant centre of Wurzburg.

Wikipedia (DE), Description, Url

2. Dom St. Kilian

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Dom St. Kilian Christian Horvat, modified by xavax (perspective). / Public domain

Würzburg Cathedral is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, dedicated to Saint Kilian. It is the seat of the Bishop of Würzburg and has served as the burial place for the Prince-Bishops of Würzburg for hundreds of years. With an overall length of 103 metres, it is the fourth largest Romanesque church building in Germany, and a masterpiece of German architecture from the Salian period. Notable later additions include work by Tilman Riemenschneider and Balthasar Neumann. The cathedral was heavily damaged by British bombs in March 1945 but rebuilt post-World War II.

Wikipedia (EN), Website, Website

3. St. Johannis

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St. Johannis Tors / Public domain

The St. Johannis Church is the second Evangelical Lutheran parish church in Würzburg after St. Stephan and at the same time the first to be built by the Evangelical Community itself. It was consecrated to the Baptist on June 24, 1895. The church, which was newly destroyed after war and newly inaugurated in 1957, is located in the downtown of Würzburg about 200 meters northeast of the residence at the confluence of Hofstallstrasse into Husarenstrasse. Due to the road network, it is not exactly eaten, but points to the northeast.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

4. Kardinal Michael von Faulhaber

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Kardinal Michael von Faulhaber Studio of Wilhelm Knarr / Public domain

Michael Cardinal Ritter von Faulhaber was a German Catholic prelate who served as Archbishop of Munich for 35 years, from 1917 to his death in 1952. Created Cardinal in 1921, von Faulhaber criticized the Weimar Republic as rooted in treason in a speech at the 62nd German Catholics' Day of 1922. Cardinal von Faulhaber was a leading member and co-founder of the Amici Israel, a priestly association founded in Rome in 1926 with the goal of advocating Jewish-Christian reconciliation.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

5. Karmelitenkirche

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The Carmelite Church St. Joseph and St. Maria Magdalena in Würzburg was built by Antonio Petrini from 1662 to 1669. The cross -shaped baroque building with a well -structured facade is the monastery church of the Würzburg Carmelite monastery St. Maria Magdalena. It was not until 1997 to 2001 that the church received a new equipment as a replacement for the one under the Second World War. It is still referred to as a fire church today.

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6. Adolf Frank

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This list of stumbling blocks in Wurzburg includes the stumbling blocks laid by Gaunt Demniger within the framework of the art project of the same name in Wurzburg, the capital of Lower Franconia. On the sidewalk in front of the victim's old residence, a brass plaque is fixed to the top of each 10 cm long concrete cuboid. This provides information about the name, year of birth and fate of the person to be remembered.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

7. Oegg-Denkmal

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Oegg-Denkmal Georg Anton Urlaub / Public domain

John Georg Og was an Austrian court locksmith and blacksmith who worked in Vienna and Wurzburg. He was commissioned by Prince Eugene to design the gates of the gardens for his Belvedi and Hove palaces in Vienna, and by three or four bishops of the Prince of Wurzburg to design the gates for the Honorary Court of the official residence of Wurzburg and its adjacent court gardens.

Wikipedia (DE)

8. Lusamgärtchen

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Lusamg ä rtchen is a small walled courtyard in Martinstaße 4, north of Neumünsterkirche in Wurzburg, Germany, formerly known as Grashof. It was originally built in the center of the late Romanesque cloister of Neumünster Monastery. In the garden is the tomb of the bard Walter von de Vogelwade.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

9. Berliner Meilenstein

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The Berlin milestones are modern small monuments with kilometers to Berlin, which are located at numerous locations in the West German countries. They are not to be confused with the historical, Prussian milestones that indicate or provide the distance to Berlin in Prussian miles.

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10. Universelles Leben

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Universelles Leben User:Mattes / Public domain

Universal Life is the name of a controversial new religious movement based in Würzburg, Germany, which is described by members as a part of the new revelation movement. The group was originally called Heimholungswerk Jesu Christi, but has been known as Universal Life since 1984.

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11. Schönbornkapelle

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Schönbornkapelle on the north side of Wurzburg Cathedral was built primarily by Balthasar Neumann under the orders of Johann Philipp Franz von Schönborn until 1724 (shell) and by Friedrich Carl von Schönborn from 1731 to 1736 as a burial site for the Schönborn family.

Wikipedia (DE)

12. Hofkirche

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Wurzburg House is a Baroque palace located on the edge of downtown Wurzburg. It was built in 1720 and completed in 1744. The interior design of this house was built under the guidance of Balthasar Neumann during the Schönborn period and was completed in 1781.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

13. Frankoniabrunnen

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The Frankonia valley is a monumental fountain on the Residenzplatz in Würzburg. It was created in 1894 by the architect Gabriel von Seidl and by the sculptor Ferdinand von Miller in the style of the new baroque for the prince regent Luitpold of Bavaria.

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14. Seligmann Bär Bamberger

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Seligman Baer Bamberger was a Talmudist and a leader of Orthodox Judaism in Germany. Between 1840 and his death he served as rabbi of Würzburg, and is therefore often referred to by his position as the Würzburger Rav.

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