20 Sights in Lübeck, Germany (with Map and Images)

Here you can find interesting sights in Lübeck, Germany. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 20 sights are available in Lübeck, Germany.

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1. St.-Aegidien-Kirche

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St.-Aegidien-Kirche / Public domain

The St.-Aegidien-Kirche or Aegidienkirche is a church building in the north German city of Lübeck, dedicated to saint Giles. It is the smallest and westernmost church in the city centre. It is first mentioned as dedicated to St Giles in 1227 - this is unusual for a north German and may link it to an earlier 1172-1182 wooden church built under bishop Henry I, formerly the abbot of the abbey dedicated to the same saint in Braunschweig. The church's coat of arms includes a "T", short for "Tilgenkark", the Low German form of the church's name, and "St Tilgen" or "St. Illigen", the Low German forms of the saint's name.

Wikipedia (EN)

2. Holstentor

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The Holsten Gate is a city gate marking off the western boundary of the old center of the Hanseatic city of Lübeck. Built in 1464, the Brick Gothic construction is one of the relics of Lübeck's medieval city fortifications and one of two remaining city gates, the other being the Citadel Gate ("Burgtor"). Known for its two-round towers and arched entrance, it is regarded today as a symbol of the city. Together with the old city centre (Altstadt) of Lübeck it has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987.

Wikipedia (EN)

3. St.-Marien-Kirche

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St.-Marien-Kirche Arnold Paul / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The Lübeck Marienkirche was built between 1265 and 1351. The Lübeck market and main parish church is located on the highest point of Lübeck's old town island, is part of the Lübeck Old Town UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the largest brick churches. It is referred to as the "mother church of brick Gothic" and is considered a major work of church building in the Baltic Sea region. St. Marien belongs to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Northern Germany.

Wikipedia (EN)

4. St.-Gertrud-Kirche

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St.-Gertrud-Kirche User:Kresspahl / Public domain

The St. Gertrud Church in Lübeck is the community church of the Evangelical parish built after a design by the Charlottenburg architects Jürgensen & Bachmann in the St. Gertrud district of Lübeck, which is consecrated by the St. Gertrud of Nivelles. The patronal feast has been historical for the suburb on the castle field in front of the Burgtor since the Middle Ages. In 1373 the Lübeck Bishop Burkhard von Serkem consecrated the first St. Gertruden chapel.

Wikipedia (DE)

5. St.-Petri Kultur- und Universitätskirche

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St. Peter's Church in Lubeck is a church, which was first mentioned in 1170. It was expanded several times over the centuries and was not built until the 15th century. It was badly damaged in World War II and did not fully recover until 1987. As the equipment could not be restored, only special services were held in the church. It is mainly used for cultural and religious activities and art exhibitions.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

6. Brahms-Institut an der Musikhochschule Lübeck

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Brahms-Institut acquired the largest private collection of Johannes Brahms engravings, manuscripts and first and early prints in 1990. In addition to Brahms, the focus is on Robert and Clara Schumann, Theodor Kirchner, Joseph Joachim, and some lesser known performers and composers of the era. In addition to music manuscripts, the collection also includes correspondence, photos, and drawings.

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7. Carlebach-Synagoge

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The Lübeck synagogue, now also called Carlebach Synagogue, is located in Lübeck's old town, St. -annen-Straße 13, between the Evangelical-Lutheran Aegidienkirche and the neighboring St.annen monastery, which is now a city museum. It is the only fully preserved Jewish church in Schleswig-Holstein and was named after her first rabbi Salomon Carlebach (1845–1919).

Wikipedia (DE)

8. Dom

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Dom Torstein Frogner / CC BY-SA 2.0

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck World Heritage Site. It was started in 1173 by Henry the Lion as a cathedral for the Bishop of Lübeck. It was partly destroyed in a bombing raid in World War II (1942), when the Arp Schnitger organ was destroyed by fire, but was subsequently reconstructed.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

9. Heiligen-Geist-Hospital

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The Heiligen-Geist-Hospital am Koberg in Lubeck, completed in 1286, is one of the oldest living social facilities in the world and one of the most important buildings in the city. It follows the tradition of the Holy Spirit Hospital, modeled after San Spirito in Sasia, Rome. These hospitals are looked after by the brothers of the Holy Spirit Church.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

10. KZ Fürstengrube-Todesmarsch

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The Fürstengrube death march is a death march carried out by prisoners in concentration camps during the evacuation of prisoners in Fürstengrube concentration camp and other concentration camps. Lack of nutrition, disease, exhaustion, abuse and murder caused many victims during the death march from January to May 1945, including several stopovers.

Wikipedia (DE)

11. Stein zum Gedenken an die Opfer des Lübecker Brandanschlags

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As an arson attack in Lubeck, the attack on asylum seekers' houses at night is considered to be 18. In that arson, ten people died. They come from Zaire, Angola, Togo and Lebanon, and the youngest was born in Germany. Another 38 residents were injured. The crime has not been solved and the investigation has been strongly criticized by the public.

Wikipedia (DE)

12. Doktor Julius Leber

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The cemetery of honor is a central memorial in Lübeck for the civilian and military victims of both world wars. It is about five hectares (50,000 m2) in size, comprises 1882 graves and approx. 500 memorial stones. It is located at the Travemünder Allee at the Sandberg/Heiligen-Geist-Kamp intersection and opposite the Burgtorfriedhof.

Wikipedia (DE)

13. Sternwarte Lübeck

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Sternwarte Lübeck Anonymous photographer, not identified anywhere; no publisher mentioned either / Public domain

The Lubeck Observatory is a school and public observatory run by Arbeitskreis Sternfreunde Lübeck E. V. Management. Operation. It was on the roof of Johannes Kepler School in Elenfield until it was demolished in early 2017. A new site was found at Grönauer Baum School. It cooperates with Lubeck University of Applied Sciences.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

14. St. Johannis Jungfrauenkloster

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St. Johannis Jungfrauenkloster Elias Diebel (16. Jahrhundert) / Public domain

St. John's Monastery in Lubeck is a Benedictine monastery founded by Bishop Henry I in the time of Henry the Lion and dedicated to the evangelist John in 1177. It belongs to Lubeck Parish. In 1246, it was converted into a Cisternaut monastery, and after the Reformation, it remained as a virgin monastery until 1803.

Wikipedia (DE)

15. Wasserkunst

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Lübecker Wasserkunst is located in St. of the Hanseatic city of Lubeck. Jürgen district, located directly on the Wakenitz River. The central building is the water tower. As a historical building, it adopts the formal language of brick Gothic. It was built in 1867 and expanded in 1890.

Wikipedia (DE)

16. Europäisches Hansemuseum

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Europäisches Hansemuseum BS Hochschulstadtteil (Diskussion) 20:27, 11. Jun. 2015 (CEST) / CC BY 4.0

The European Hansemuseum is a museum in Lübeck, Germany dedicated to the history of the Hanseatic League. Covering an area of in total 7,405 square metres (79,710 sq ft), is the largest museum in the world specifically dedicated to this subject. The museum was opened in May 2015.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

17. Sankt Bonifatius

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The church building of St. Bonifatius was in 1952 by the architect Emil Steffann in the suburb of Lübeck-St. Lorenz-Nord built as an emergency church, since the number of Catholics with the refugees of the Second World War had increased by five times.

Wikipedia (DE)

18. Burgtor

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The Burgtor, built 1444 in late Gothic style, was the northern city gate of Hanseatic Lübeck, now in Germany. It is one of two towered gates remaining from the medieval fortifications, the other being the more famous Holstentor.

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19. Ende des Kreuzweges

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Lubeck Cross Station, one of the oldest in Germany, has been celebrated since 1994. There are seven stations on the 1,650-metre trail, with only the first and last-the start and end of the Cross Road-surviving.

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20. Trägerstecksperre

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Trägerstecksperre Bundeswehr Verteidigungsbezirkskommando 47 Gießen / CC BY-SA 2.0 de

A prepared barrier is a device installed on a transportation facility. Once triggered, its purpose is to slow down and guide an opponent's attack. A common form of preparation barrier is blasting shaft.

Wikipedia (DE)

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.