17 Sights in Chemnitz, Germany (with Map and Images)

Here you can find interesting sights in Chemnitz, Germany. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 17 sights are available in Chemnitz, Germany.

Back to the list of cities in Germany

1. Saxoniabrunnen

Show sight on map
Saxoniabrunnen Fotograf unbekannt; Druck und Verlag "Körner und Lauterbach" / Public domain

Saxoniabrunnen, which once decorated Chemnitz's Ro ️ markt, has been standing on the redesigned Johannisplatz since early July 2011. Existing pedestals and accessories have been repaired. Bronze statues of blacksmiths and spinners on the side, and statues of Saxony, sacrificed in the war by metal donations, were all cast with donated money. During the reconstruction process, the fountain was placed on a single-layer pedestal instead of the previous two-layer pedestal. According to Saxoniabrunnen-Verein chairman Peter Fritzsche, the previous fence was deliberately omitted during the rebuilding process so that people could more consciously approach the fountain and experience it. The newly cast "Saxony" is much smaller than the original one, and its implementation is slightly simplified. Therefore, for example, lack. The great Saxon coat of arms clearly indicated in the early days that this character is the embodiment of Saxons.

Wikipedia (DE)

2. Vier Tageszeiten

Show sight on map
Vier Tageszeiten Autor/-in unbekanntUnknown author / Public domain

"Four Times of the Day" is a set of four characters designed by Johannes Schilling for the North Slope of Dresden Bruhr Terrace. Viewed from left to right, in 1868, the allegorical incarnations of "Night" and "Night" were placed at the bottom of the stairs, and in 1871, the allegorical incarnations of "Morning" and "Noon" were placed at the top of the stairs. The original remained here until 1908; In 1936, they were taken to Chemnitz and placed in the park of Castle Pond. In Dresden, these figures were replaced by bronze castings.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

3. St. Markus

Show sight on map
St. Markus André Pistotnik Der ursprünglich hochladende Benutzer war Pisty in der Wikipedia auf Deutsch / CC-BY-SA-3.0

Built between 1893 and 1895, the Protestant Church of St. Mark in Körnerplatz Sonnenberg was designed by Berlin architects Abesser and Kröger in the North German brick Gothic style. What is striking is the double helmet tower that can be seen from a distance. The stained glass windows remain as they are. The organ at that time came from Jehmlich, an organ maker in Dresden. Only part of the original paint on the wall remained. The church has 1350 seats.

Wikipedia (DE)

4. Museum Gunzenhauser

Show sight on map

The Gunzenhauser Museum is a museum and art gallery located in Chemnitz, the third largest city of Saxony, Germany. It contains 2,459 works by 270 modern artists of the 20th century that have been collected by the art dealer Dr. Alfred Gunzenhauser. The Gunzenhauser Museum was inaugurated in December 2007 in the presence of German President Horst Köhler and is one of the most important museums of modern art in Germany.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

5. Parkeisenbahn Chemnitz

Show sight on map
Parkeisenbahn Chemnitz Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

The Parkeisenbahn Chemnitz (PEC) is a narrow gauge children's railway in Chemnitz, Saxony, Germany. It is 2.3 kilometres long and has one station, two stops, one depot and one block post. Until 1990 it was operated as a Pioniereisenbahn. The Parkeisenbahn has six diesel locomotives, two steam locomotives, nine passenger wagons and some other vehicles. It has the route number 12248.

Wikipedia (EN), Url

6. Karl-Marx-Monument

Show sight on map
Karl-Marx-Monument Robert Steffens / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The Karl Marx Monument is a 7.10m (23.29ft)-tall stylized head of Karl Marx in Chemnitz, Germany. The heavy-duty sculpture, together with the base platform, stand over 13 meters tall and weighs approximately 40 tonnes. On a wall just behind the monument, the phrase "Workers of the world, unite!" is inscripted in four languages: German, English, French and Russian.

Wikipedia (EN)

7. Museum für Naturkunde Chemnitz

Show sight on map

The Chemnitz Museum of Natural History has been located in Dastietz, Chemnitz since 2004. In addition to more than 300,000 exhibits, the exhibition space on the first floor also includes Sterzeleanum, a historical cabinet, insect museum and temporary exhibition. In the large atrium, there is a petrified forest, which is the largest plant fossil in Europe.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

8. Schloßteichpark

Show sight on map
Schloßteichpark Diktator / Public domain

Chemnitz Castle is a district of Chemnitz, Germany. The area was formed in 1859 by two rural communities, "Schloßgasse" and "Schloßvorwerk". The town was merged on October 1, 1880. B95 and B107 go through Chemnitz Castle. Adjacent to Chemnitz Castle are Zentrum, Kassberg, Altendorf, Borna-Heinersdorf, Furth and Hilbersdorf districts.

Wikipedia (DE)

9. Propsteikirche St. Johannes Nepomuk

Show sight on map
Propsteikirche St. Johannes Nepomuk M.Uebel / Public domain

The Church of the Provost of St. John Nebomuk is a Roman Catholic church in Chemnitz, Germany. Today's church was built between 1953 and 1955 and was designed by Chemnitz architect Willie Schenefeld. The church is located in the southeastern part of the Ka å berg district, adjacent to Reichsstra å e and Hohe Stra å e.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

10. St. Matthäus

Show sight on map

Evangelical Lutheran Church St. Zinzendorfstraße 16, Altendorf District, Chemnitz. Matthäus was built in 1885 according to the plan of architect Christian Friedrich Arnold and is now listed as a historical site. The associated St. Matthew's Cemetery is a protected complex with cemetery chapels and tombstones.

Wikipedia (DE)

11. Kreuzkirche

Show sight on map

St. Jacob's Cross Church was built in 1935/36 in the Carsenberg district of Chemnitz by Otto Batnen, a prominent 20th-century church builder. Its 40-meter-high Independence Tower, reminiscent of Italy's bell tower, is a striking place in the region. After being destroyed in 1945, it was rebuilt until 1954.

Wikipedia (DE)

12. St. Petri Kirche

Show sight on map
St. Petri Kirche Reinhard Höll / CC-BY-SA-3.0

St. Peter's Church is a Protestant church in Chemnitz, Germany. It was built between 1885 and 1888 and designed by Leipzig architect Hans Engel. It is a neo-Gothic hall church. The church is located in Theaterplatz, so it is close to the Opera House and Chemnitz Art Collection.

Wikipedia (DE)

13. Sächsisches Industriemuseum Chemnitz

Show sight on map

The Chemnitz Industrial Museum is a comprehensive collection of Saxon industrial history in Chemnitz and is part of the Saxon Industrial Museum Association. The exhibition is located in the former casting hall of Werkzeugmaschinenfabrik Hermann und Alfred Escher AG.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

14. Schlosskirche St.Marien

Show sight on map
Schlosskirche St.Marien Reinhard Höll / CC-BY-SA-3.0

Chemnitz Castle Church is located on Castle Hill in Chemnitz Castle District and is considered the most valuable building in the city. It is one of two churches in the parish of St. Peter's Castle of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Saxony.

Wikipedia (DE)

15. Johanna Zuer

Show sight on map
Johanna Zuer Dr. Bernd Gross / Copyrighted free use

The list of stumbling blocks in Chemnitz contains all the stumbling blocks that were laid as part of Gunter Demnig's art project in Chemnitz. They are intended to think of the victims of National Socialism who lived and worked in Chemnitz.

Wikipedia (DE)

16. Schloßbergmuseum Chemnitz

Show sight on map
Schloßbergmuseum Chemnitz Roman Grabolle (Krtek76) / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Schloßberg Museum is the Museum of City History of the City of Chemnitz. It is located in the Schloßchemnitz district on the site of an old Benedictine monastery, the Emperor Lothar III. around 1136 on a mountain near the Chemnitz.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

17. Schillerplatz

Show sight on map

Schiller Square in Chemnitz is a park in the center of Chemnitz. It got its name on the 100th anniversary in 1859. It was built to commemorate Friedrich Schiller's birthday and has been expanded as planned since 1890.

Wikipedia (DE)

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.