100 Sights in Berlin, Germany (with Map and Images)

Looking for premium sights?

Here you can book tickets, guided tours and other activities in Berlin:

Get tickets and guided tours now *

Here you can find interesting sights in Berlin, Germany. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 100 sights are available in Berlin, Germany.

Back to the list of cities in Germany

1. Landschaftspark Herzberge

Show sight on map
Landschaftspark Herzberge Angela M. Arnold, Berlin (=44penguins) / CC BY-SA 3.0

The entire former area around Queen Elizabeth Hertzberg Evangelical Hospital (KEH) has been known as Hertzberg Landscape Park since 2010. It is located in the Lichtenberg district of Berlin. Until 2007, the area was still a mixture of fallow, commercial, residential and green, with no co-development and many problems. Eastern German Agricultural Exchange E. Since 2004, V. Launched a series of projects with Bezirksamt Lichtenberg to promote the region's moderate, close-to-nature development, becoming a model project for Berlin's urban agriculture. Over the years, at different stages, different areas have been merged and redesigned as agricultural land, interconnected biological communities, road systems and recreational areas. Major structural renovation work was basically completed in 2013. Agricultural utilization through extensive grazing of coarse-haired Pomeranian landscape sheep, while protecting and developing a species-rich and valuable landscape reserve in this area. (2) Agricultural utilization through extensive grazing of coarse-haired Pomeranian landscape sheep, while protecting and developing a species-rich and valuable landscape reserve in this area. (2) Through extensive grazing of coarse-haired Pomeranian landscape sheep. An application has been made to the Berlin Senate to designate Herzberge Landscape Park as a landscape protection area. This requirement was met in the spring of 2019.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

2. Deutsches Spionagemuseum

Show sight on map
Deutsches Spionagemuseum Deutsches Spionagemuseum / German Spy Museum Berlin / CC BY-SA 4.0

The Berlin Spy Museum is a private museum in Berlin which was created by former journalist Franz-Michael Günther. The museum opened to the public on the 19th of September 2015. Günther's aspirations were to create a museum devoted to the history of spies and espionage in the former spy capital of Germany. The museum is located in the central area of Potsdamer Platz, formerly known as the "death strip", as it lies on the perimeters of the wall which once divided East and West Berlin. The museum acts as an educational institution, with its permanent exhibitions bridging together centuries of espionage stories and tactics, immersing visitors in a multi-media experience. The museum particularly focuses on the World Wars and the Cold War through a range of a 1000 different exhibits and artefacts. Since its opening in 2015, 1,000,000 people have visited the museum and recently in 2020 it was nominated for the European Museum of the Year Award. The Berlin Spy Museum is partnered with the International Spy Museum in Washington, D. C. , and many of the artefacts and installations within the museum have captured media attention around the world.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

3. Haus der Wannseekonferenz

Show sight on map

The Wannsee Conference was a meeting of senior government officials of Nazi Germany and Schutzstaffel (SS) leaders, held in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee on 20 January 1942. The purpose of the conference, called by the director of the Reich Security Main Office SS-Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich, was to ensure the co-operation of administrative leaders of various government departments in the implementation of the Final Solution to the Jewish question, whereby most of the Jews of German-occupied Europe would be deported to occupied Poland and murdered. Conference participants included representatives from several government ministries, including state secretaries from the Foreign Office, the justice, interior, and state ministries, and representatives from the SS. In the course of the meeting, Heydrich outlined how European Jews would be rounded up and sent to extermination camps in the General Government, where they would be killed.

Wikipedia (EN), Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Website

4. Museumsinsel

Show sight on map

The Museum Island is a museum complex on the northern part of the Spree Island in the historic heart of Berlin. It is one of the most visited sights of Germany's capital and one of the most important museum sites in Europe. Built from 1830 to 1930 by order of the Prussian Kings according to plans by five architects, Museum Island was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999. It consists of the Altes Museum, the Neues Museum, the Alte Nationalgalerie, the Bode-Museum and the Pergamonmuseum. As Museum Island includes all of Spree Island north of the Unter den Linden, the Berliner Dom is also located here, near the Lustgarten. To the south, the reconstructed Berlin Palace houses the Humboldt Forum museum and opened in 2020. Since German reunification, the Museum Island has been rebuilt and extended according to a master plan. In 2019, a new visitor center and art gallery, the James Simon Gallery, was opened.

Wikipedia (EN), Heritage Website, Website

5. Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas

Show sight on map

The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, also known as the Holocaust Memorial, is a memorial in Berlin to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, designed by architect Peter Eisenman and Buro Happold. It consists of a 19,000-square-metre (200,000 sq ft) site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs or "stelae", arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. The original plan was to place nearly 4,000 slabs, but after the recalculation, the number of slabs that could legally fit into the designated areas was 2,711. The stelae are 2.38 m long, 0.95 m wide and vary in height from 0.2 to 4.7 metres. They are organized in rows, 54 of them going north–south, and 87 heading east–west at right angles but set slightly askew. An attached underground "Place of Information" holds the names of approximately 3 million Jewish Holocaust victims, obtained from the Israeli museum Yad Vashem.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

6. Filmmuseum Potsdam

Show sight on map
Filmmuseum Potsdam Florian S. / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The Filmmuseum Potsdam was founded in 1981 as the "Film Museum of the GDR", is therefore considered the oldest film museum with its own collection and exhibitions in Germany and received its current name in 1990. It has been in the Brandenburg State of Brandenburg since 1991 and belongs to the Babelsberg Film University Organizationally. At the center of the collections and the constant exhibition are the oldest film studio in the world in Babelsberg, its film productions and the artists who participated in films from Bioscop, UFA, DEFA and Studio Babelsberg. Change exhibitions, family exhibitions and foyer exhibitions on German and international film and media topics complement the exhibition program. The film museum runs a museum shop and a cinema with several performances daily, silent film demonstrations are accompanied musically on the historical world cinema orgel.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

7. Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin

Show sight on map

The German Museum of Technology opened in 1983 as Museum für Verkehr und Technik and remained in place until 1996. The museum considers itself a successor to various technology museums that existed in Berlin before the Second World War, such as the Transportation and Architecture Museum. DTM has an exhibition area of 26,500 square metres and is located in the former depot and freight terminal of Anhalter Bahnhof. In 2019, 635,382 people visited the museum. The theme focuses on the three main areas of transportation, but the museum wants to show all the technical areas as much as possible, so there are also exhibitions, such as. Used in printing, news, production and film technology. The museum sees itself as a museum of culture and historical technology, showcasing the interplay of technological development with social, economic and political history.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

8. Corbusierhaus

Show sight on map

Unité d'Habitation of Berlin is a 1958 apartment building located in Berlin, Germany, designed by Le Corbusier following his concept of Unité d'Habitation. Le Corbusier's Unité d'Habitation concept was materialised in four other buildings in France with a similar design. The building is constructed in béton brut and is part of the initial architecture style we know today as brutalism. The structure was built with on site prefab cast concrete panels and poured ceiling slabs. The Modulor system is the base measure of the Unité and Corbusier used not more than 15 Modulor measures to construct the entire structure form. Ultimately the work has been eliminated from Le Corbusier's oeuvre, which he confirmed himself until his death in 1965 and which has also been confirmed posthumous in 1967 in his last authorized publication of his work.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

9. Neuer Lustgarten

Show sight on map
Neuer Lustgarten Autor/-in unbekanntUnknown author / Public domain

The Lustgarten is the oldest garden in Potsdam. It is bordered by Breite Straße with the Marstall in the north, the Havel in the east, the railway embankment in the south and the Ministry of the Interior in the west. Created as a baroque garden under the Great Elector Friedrich Wilhelm for the city palace and half transformed into a flat parade area under King Friedrich Wilhelm I, the rest was embellished by Frederick II and redesigned in 1829 by Peter Joseph Lenné. After the Second World War, the construction of the Ernst Thalmann Stadium in the Lustgarten began the removal of the city palace. During the construction of the Interhotel Potsdam in 1969, the Lustgarten disappeared beyond recognition. On the occasion of the Federal Garden Show in 2001, a new pleasure garden was created after the demolition of the Thälmann Stadium.

Wikipedia (DE)

10. St. Lukas-Kirche

Show sight on map

San Lucas Church is a church in Berlin's Croitzberg district. It is built in front of the closed street of Bernburger Straße along with the porch and bell tower. Built between 1859 and 1861, the church is a nave with crossed arms, led by building inspector Gustav Moller. The conceptual style design of the Royal Cathedral was designed by Friedrich August Stler, head of the Prussian court and national building department. I'm 17. The church was completed on March 3, 1861. I'm 29. She was destroyed on 22 April 1945. The church has been listed as a historic monument since 1953 and has been rebuilt under the direction of architect Georg Thofehrn. I'm 19. It was reopened on December 14, 1954. The church belongs to the Stadtmitte church district in Berlin. In 1960, architect Henry Zimendorf built the new administrative building.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

11. Straßenbahndenkmal

Show sight on map
Straßenbahndenkmal Autor/-in unbekanntUnknown author / Public domain

The Groß-Lichterfelde tram was the metre-gauge tram in today's Berlin districts and locations lichterfelde, Lankwitz, Steglitz, Südende and Mariendorf. It originated from the Electric Railway in Lichterfelde, opened in 1881, which is considered the first permanently electrically powered tram in the world. It was built by Siemens & Halske and operated from May 16, 1881. Between 1890 and 1895, the railway was supplemented by further lines and henceforth operated as the Electric Tram Groß-Lichterfelde – Lankwitz – Steglitz – Südende. Siemens remained the owner of the railway until 1906, which was then sold to the district of Teltow. Via the Teltower Kreisbahnen, the railway was ultimately absorbed into the tram network of Greater Berlin. On 14 February 1930, the last trains ran on the metre-gauge network.

Wikipedia (DE)

12. Jelena-Šantić-Friedenspark

Show sight on map
Jelena-Šantić-Friedenspark 44penguins (Angela M. Arnold) / CC BY-SA 3.0

Kienbergpark is a public green and recreational area on the eastern bank of the Wuhle in Berlin's Hellersdorf district. The name was given after the 102.2 meter high Kienberg in the center of the park. It was laid out in 1996 on the initiative of the Hellersdorf district administration on previous brownfield sites and equipped with a peace sign made of natural materials. At the same time, the park is part of a long-term planned and gradually realized superordinate green corridor, the Trianonpark, which extends from Ahrensfelde to Köpenick, where it merges into the Köpenick Forest. The facility, initially called Rohrbruchpark, was renamed in 2003 after the Serbian peace activist and prima ballerina Jelena Šantić. In the course of the IGA 2017, the park was renamed Kienbergpark and slightly redesigned.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

13. Hochbunker

Show sight on map

The Pallassstraße Hochbunker, also referred to as a sports Palace bunker, is a four-storey high bunker on Pallassstraße in the Schöneberg district of Berlin, the shell of which was completed in the Second World War. It was used as a civil protection facility after the final expansion and modernization in the 1980s and 2010 and was used as a warehouse for emergency goods. Since May 2002, the bunker has been used as an event location by the history of the neighboring Sophie-Scholl School as a "place of memory", the Tempelhof-Schöneberg art office and by the Berlin Unterwelten association; The association takes care of the maintenance of the building on behalf of the Berlin Senate. The development as a civil protection system was carried out in 2010, and since 2011 it has been a listed building.

Wikipedia (DE)

14. Alter St.-Matthäus-Kirchhof

Show sight on map

Alter St.-Matthäus-Kirchhof is a cemetery in Schöneberg, Berlin, Germany. It was established in 1856 by the Protestant parish of St. Matthew. It is known for its interment of the Brothers Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, folklore tellers of "Cinderella" ("Aschenputtel"), "The Frog Prince", "Hansel and Gretel", "Rapunzel", "Rumpelstiltskin" ("Rumpelstilzchen"), and "Snow White" ("Schneewittchen"); Rudolf Virchow, variously known as "father of modern pathology", "father of modern medicine" or "father of social medicine"; Talat Pasha, and Claus von Stauffenberg, a German Army officer who almost assassinated Adolf Hitler. As for Stauffenberg, his corpse was exhumed by the SS on 22 July 1944, the day after his burial, and cremated to remove any traces of him. His tombstone, however, remains intact.

Wikipedia (EN)

15. Zum Guten Hirten

Show sight on map

Zum Guten Hirten, an evangelical church in Berlin's Friedenau district, is a nave church with narrow aisles and 70-meter-high neo-Gothic towers designed by Karl Doflein. The slate-covered masonry building was built in an exposed urban setting in Friedrich-Wilhelm Square and is covered with crimson bricks. On Queen August Victoria's birthday, the foundation stone laying ceremony was held in front of her, and she also attended the inauguration ceremony. During the Second World War, the church was damaged by Allied air strikes, including windows, most of the roof was destroyed, and all the frescoes were damaged by the weather. After the war, the interior was simply restored, but in later renovations, it returned to its original appearance. This church is listed as a historical monument.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

16. Ingeborg Kummerow

Show sight on map

Ingeborg Kummerow was a Berlin office worker and housewife who in 1936 had married Dr. Hansheinrich Kummerow, a high-flying telecommunications engineer, employed in the research and development department at Loewe-Radio-AG. Loewe was an electronics company which had taken a lead in developing televisions technology, but which was by this time increasingly concentrating on defence related telecommunications technology. It was through her husband that Ingeborg Kummerow became involved in anti-government resistance. She was one of a batch of seventeen execution victims who died on the guillotine at the Plötzensee execution facility on 5 August 1943. Sources giving the date of her execution, incorrectly, as 5 August 1944 are believed to be based on a self-perpetuating error.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

17. St. Hedwigs-Kathedrale Berlin

Show sight on map

The Roman Catholic Cathedral of St. Hedwig is a monument to Bebelplatz in Berlin's Mitte and part of the Fridericianum Forum. It is the Bishop's Church of the Archdiocese of Berlin and the Diocese Church of St. Hedwig's Cathedral Diocese. The city's most important Catholic church is also considered the most important in the city's history. This circular building was commissioned by Frederick the Great in 1747 and built in Frederick Rococo style according to the plan of Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff. Burned down in World War II, the cathedral was restored in postwar modernist style between 1952 and 1963 under Hans Schwiper's plan. It has been closed since 2018 for renovations and redevelopment, with liturgy taking place at St. Joseph's Church in Berlin-the wedding.

Wikipedia (DE), Architect Wikipedia, Heritage Website, Website

18. Matrosenhaus

Show sight on map

Park Glienicke, is an English landscape garden in the southwestern outskirts of Berlin, Germany. It is located in the locality of Wannsee in the Steglitz-Zehlendorf borough. Close to Glienicke Bridge the park is open to the general public. The park is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin. Within the ensemble it is one of the five main parks, the others being Sanssouci Park, New Garden, Babelsberg Park and Peacock Island (Pfaueninsel). Regarding diversity in gardening styles within the Potsdam park ensemble Park Glienicke is only superseded by Sanssouci Park. Furthermore, it is a park especially characterized by one personality due to the intense involvement of Prince Charles of Prussia. The park covers approximately 116 hectares

Wikipedia (EN)

19. Volkspark Wilmersdorf

Show sight on map

Public green spaces and recreational facilities Volkspark Wilmersdorf is located in the Wilmersdorf district of the Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf district of Berlin, near Wilhelmsaue Street, the former village centre of Alt-Wilmersdorf. Together with the neighboring Schöneberg Rudolph Wilde Park, Volkspark forms a green belt in the city center with a length of about 2.5 kilometers and a width of about 150 meters. The part of Wilmersdorf is about 1,850 meters and extends from Rudolph Wilde Park in Kufsteiner Stra è e in the east to Stadtring in the west. Covering an area of 12.3 hectares, the park is the largest green area in Wilmsdorf, including Fennsee Lake at the western exit and two sports fields between Uhlandstraße and Bundesallee, where Wilmsdorf Lake is located.

Wikipedia (DE)

20. Kollwitzplatz

Show sight on map

Kollwitzplatz is a city square in the Berlin district of Prenzlauer Berg, district of Pankow. The square forms the center of the so-called "Kollwitzkiez". It was named, on 7 October 1947, after the German graphic artist and sculptor Käthe Kollwitz, who spent a large part of her life here in the house at Weissenburger Straße No. 25. Until then, it was called Wörther Platz; a name that was given to it when the area was planned for construction in 1875. Indirectly, this name is also a reminder of her husband Karl Kollwitz, who worked here as a physician until 1940 and thus shaped the area around the square independently of his wife. The triangular complex is bordered by Kollwitzstraße, Knaackstraße and Wörther Straße. In total, the square is about 6000 m2 in size.

Wikipedia (EN)

21. Sankt Marien

Show sight on map

The St. Marien Church of the Evangelical Lutheran St. Marishe community in the independent Evangelical Lutheran church is located in Riemeisterstraße 10–12 in the Zehlendorf district of the Steglitz-Zehlendorf district. The church building designed according to the plans of the architect Hans Schmidt from Hamburg-Harburg was completed by the architectural office Kraul and Jäckel from Hamburg. The architects Manfred F. Manleitner and Erwin SRP, both from Berlin, were commissioned with the local construction management. The church building was consecrated on February 18, 1973 by the later Bishop Gerhard Rost under the assistant of church councilor Matthias Schulz and the then parish priest Jobst Schöne. The parish belongs to the Berlin-Brandenburg church district.

Wikipedia (DE)

22. Museum Barberini

Show sight on map

The Museum Barberini is an art museum in Potsdam opened in 2017. Its exhibitions range from the so-called Old Masters to contemporary art, with an emphasis on impressionist painting. Centered around works from the collection of its founder and patron Hasso Plattner, the Barberini presents three temporary exhibitions per year, featuring loans from international museums and private collections. Academic conferences serve to prepare these exhibitions. At the same time, shorter gallery displays – the so-called “art histories” – put works from the collection into constantly shifting contexts. The museum aims to offer a diverse programme of events and educational activities as well as digital offers like the Barberini App and the 4K Smart Wall in the museum.

Wikipedia (EN), Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Website, Youtube

23. Heilige-Geist-Kirche

Show sight on map

The Evangelical Heilige-Geist-Church, built in 1905–1906 according to plans by Georg Dinklage and Ernst Paulus on the pointed-angled corner plot of Perleberger Straße 36/Birkenstraße 60/61, forms the urban center of the Stephans district in the Moabit district. On December 19, 1906, the church was inaugurated in the presence of Empress Auguste Viktoria. During the Second World War, the Heilige Geist Church suffered little damage. Only the colored glass windows had to be replaced. The church in historicizing Gothic style, reminiscent of Märkische traditions, is a listed building. The Evangelical parish of Heilige-Geist belongs to the Church Circle of Berlin Stadtmitte (KKBS) of the Evangelical Church in Berlin-Brandenburg-Silesian Oberlausitz (Ekbo).

Wikipedia (DE)

24. Der Bevölkerung

Show sight on map

The artwork DER BEVÖLKERUNG by Hans Haacke was as commissioned and installed in 2000. It was erected in the north courtyard of the German Reichstag building in the year 2000 by resolution of the German Bundestag. The work consists of a trough measuring 21 x 7 meters, bounded by wooden beams, from the center of which the words "DER BEVÖLKERUNG" radiate toward the sky in white neon letters. The words can be seen from all levels of the building: from the assembly hall, the floor reserved for the political parties and the press, as well as by visitors on the roof. The public funds allocated to the project were the equivalent of approx. 200,000 euros. The artwork was realized within the framework of the Reichstag's art in architecture program.

Wikipedia (EN)

25. Martin-Luther-Kirche

Show sight on map

The Martin Luther Church in today's Berlin district of Neukölln was built in the style of Fritz Gottlob's neo-Gothic. The foundation stone was laid on July 2, 1908. At the inauguration of the church on November 15, 1909, the Prince of August Wilhelm's imperial house took part. The church was destroyed in the Second World War; The reconstruction began in 1952 under the architect W. Rossa. The tower hood was restored. In 1953 the topping -out ceremony for the nave took place. On January 20, 1957, Bishop Otto Dibelius inaugurated the rebuilt church, which is now a listed building. In 1970, according to the plans of the architect Günter Kohlhaus, a renovation was started, which was preliminary with the inauguration on October 1, 1972.

Wikipedia (DE)

26. Helmholtzplatz

Show sight on map

The Helmholtzplatz, Ugs. Helmi, is a rectangular square in the Prenzlauer Berg district of the Pankow district of Berlin. It forms the central square of the Helmholtzkiez. He is named after the physicist Hermann von Helmholtz. The heavily green space with two children's playgrounds, a football field, several table tennis slabs, a streetball court and a neighborhood meeting is about three meters above the level of the surrounding residential streets Raumerstraße, Lychener Straße, Lettestraße, Schliemannstraße and Dunckerstrasse. It conveys the character of a small park in the middle of the densely settled old building area and fulfills the function of an important recreation area and a social contact point for the residents.

Wikipedia (DE)

27. Preußischer optischer Telegraf, Station 3

Show sight on map

The Prussian Semaphore System was a telegraphic communications system used between Berlin and the Rhine Province from 1832 to 1849. It could transmit administrative and military messages by optical signal over a distance of nearly 550 kilometres (340 mi). The telegraph line comprised 62 stations each furnished with a signal mast with six cable-operated arms. The stations were equipped with telescopes that operators used to copy coded messages and forward them to the next station. Three dispatch departments located in Berlin, Cologne and Koblenz handled the coding and decoding of official telegrams. Although electric telegraphy made the system obsolete for military use, simplified semaphores were still used for railway signals.

Wikipedia (EN)

28. Berliner Dom

Show sight on map

The Berlin Cathedral, also known as, the Evangelical Supreme Parish and Collegiate Church, is a monumental German Evangelical church and dynastic tomb on the Museum Island in central Berlin. Having its origins as a castle chapel for the Berlin Palace, several structures have served to house the church since the 1400s. The present collegiate church was built from 1894 to 1905 by order of German Emperor William II according to plans by Julius Raschdorff in Renaissance and Baroque Revival styles. The listed building is the largest Protestant church in Germany and one of the most important dynastic tombs in Europe. In addition to church services, the cathedral is used for state ceremonies, concerts and other events.

Wikipedia (EN), Architect Wikipedia, Youtube, Heritage Website, Website

29. englische Kirche St. George

Show sight on map
englische Kirche St. George De-okin (talk) 17:55, 31 October 2010 (UTC) / CC BY 3.0

St. George's Church is an Anglican church in Berlin, Germany, a parish of the Diocese in Europe of the Church of England. The original building was erected on Monbijou Park in 1885, but during the Second World War was destroyed in allied bombings. The original site on Oranienburger Straße happened to be in what had become the Soviet sector of Berlin in 1945 and was therefore abandoned and the ruins removed in 1949. In 1950 the congregation built a new church on the corner of Preußenallee and Badenallee in Neu-Westend, part of the Westend locality of Berlin in the British sector. The church served as the garrison church of the British Army during the Allied occupation, and reverted to civilian control in 1994.

Wikipedia (EN)

30. Deutscher Dom

Show sight on map

The New Church, is located in Berlin on the Gendarmenmarkt across from French Church of Friedrichstadt. Its parish comprised the northern part of the then new quarter of Friedrichstadt, which until then belonged to the parish of the congregations of Jerusalem's Church. The Lutheran and Calvinist congregants used German as their native language, as opposed to the French-speaking Calvinist congregation of the adjacent French Church of Friedrichstadt. The congregants' native language combined with the domed tower earned the church its colloquial name Deutscher Dom. While the church physically resembles a cathedral, it is not a cathedral in the formal sense of the word, as it was never the seat of a bishop.

Wikipedia (EN), Heritage Website

31. Hanf Museum Berlin

Show sight on map

The Hemp Museum was opened in Berlin on 6 December 1994. It is the only museum in Germany focused on the cannabis plant. The museum also actively promotes the protection of children and young people and offers individually tailored tours of the exhibition with care staff. It serves as a meeting place for the organisers of the Hanfparade. The Hanf Museum regularly takes part in the "Long Night of Museums", the Berlin Fairytale Days and the Historale which takes place in the Nikolai Quarter. In 2017, the Hanf Museum took part in the Kirchentag in Berlin as a self-organised event on the topic of the war on drugs with speakers from South American victims, including the Reverend Martin Diaz from El Salvador.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

32. Advent-Kirche

Show sight on map
Advent-Kirche 44penguins (Angela M. Arnold) / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Advent Church is an Protestant church in the Berlin district of Prenzlauer Berg of the Pankow district. It is a masonry building blinded with clinkers, which was built according to designs by the architects Georg Dinklage and Ernst Paulus in the years 1910-1911. The architecture style is assigned to the beginning of modernity, but the neo -Gothic has an effect in the pointed arched portals and the tracery windows in the gable facade. The Evangelical Advent-Zacheus-Kirchengemeinde merged with the Bartholomäus-Kirchengemeinde to the Evangelical parish on Friedrichshain in the Kirchenkreis Berlin Stadtmitte from January 1, 2022, and the Advent Church is under monument protection.

Wikipedia (DE)

33. Direktorenhaus Berlin

Show sight on map

The Berlin Director House is a gallery and an art and cultural center in the Mitte district of Berlin. It was founded in 2010 by Pascal Johanssen and Katja Kleiss in Berlin as an exhibition location for applied art. The center is located on the site and building complex of the old coin, the former state minting in the historic center of Berlin. After 20 years of vacancy, the dilapidated building was renovated by the operators of the directors' house and thus retained from decay. The director house is also the seat of the Musicboard Berlin, well -known artists and musicians such as the Berlin rock band Bonaparte use the rooms of the house as studios and rehearsal rooms.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

34. Teufelsberg

Show sight on map

Teufelsberg is a non-natural hill in Berlin, Germany, in the Grunewald locality of former West Berlin. It rises about 80 metres (260 ft) above the surrounding Teltow plateau and 120. 1 metres (394 ft) above the sea level, in the north of Berlin's Grunewald Forest. It was named after the Teufelssee in its southerly vicinity. The hill is made of debris and rubble, and covers an unfinished Nazi military-technical college. During the Cold War, there was a U. S. listening station on the hill, Field Station Berlin. The site of the former field station is now fenced off and is currently being managed by an organisation which charges 5 to 10 euros for public access.

Wikipedia (EN)

35. Ernst Haeckel

Show sight on map
Ernst Haeckel Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel was a German zoologist, naturalist, eugenicist, philosopher, physician, professor, marine biologist and artist. He discovered, described and named thousands of new species, mapped a genealogical tree relating all life forms and connected many terms in biology, including ecology, phylum, phylogeny, and Protista. Haeckel promoted and popularised Charles Darwin's work in Germany and developed the influential but no longer widely held recapitulation theory claiming that an individual organism's biological development, or ontogeny, parallels and summarises its species' evolutionary development, or phylogeny.

Wikipedia (EN)

36. Erwin Gehrts

Show sight on map
Erwin Gehrts Unknown / Fair use

Erwin Gehrts was a German conservative socialist, resistance fighter against the Nazi regime, journalist and colonel in the Luftwaffe. Trained as a teacher, Gehrts was conscripted as a flying officer during World War I. During the interwar period, he became a journalist. However, with the emergence of the Nazi states, his newspaper, the Tägliche Rundschau, was banned. Finding work with the Luftwaffe, he became disillusioned with the Nazis. He became associated with a Berlin-based anti-fascist resistance group that was later called the Red Orchestra by the Abwehr and an informer to Harro Shulze-Boysen, passing secrets from the air ministry.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

37. James-Simon-Galerie

Show sight on map

The James Simon Gallery is a centrally located visitor center and art gallery between the reconstructed Neues Museum and the Kupfergraben arm of the Spree river on Museum Island in Berlin, Germany. Designed by architect David Chipperfield, the gallery is named after the maecenas Henri James Simon (1851–1932) who brought worldwide fame to the Berlin State Museums with his lavish donations. As the ensemble's sixth building, the gallery has a prominent position at the site of the former Packhof designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel, which was demolished in 1938, and its design is inspired by the construction history of Museum Island.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

38. Weiße Kreuze

Show sight on map

White Crosses is a memorial for those who died during the Cold War at the Berlin Wall. It is located at the shore of the river Spree in Berlin next to the Reichstag building, which houses the German parliament. Established by the private group Berliner Bürger-Verein on the 10th anniversary of the Berlin Wall in 1971 it was first located east of the Reichstag on a fence directly in front of the wall. After the German reunification in 1990 it kept its location until construction of the new government buildings next to the Reichstag was started at the end of that century – Berlin was chosen to be the new capital of Germany.

Wikipedia (EN)

39. Wohnanlage ehem. Gertraudenhospital

Show sight on map

The former Gertraudenhospital in Wartenburgstrasse 1 corner of Großbeerenstraße in Berlin's Kreuzberg district is a listed brick building with several wings and a park -like front garden from the 1870s. Originally created around 1406 as a hospital for middle-class citizens in Berlin-Mitte, the house moved to Kreuzberg in 1945 came under the administration of the hospital on the urban. After selling at the beginning of the 21st century, it was converted into a residential park with 103 condominiums and two trade units while maintaining the monument conservation point of view by the Berlin architecture firm Stephan Höhne.

Wikipedia (DE)

40. SA-Gefängnis Papestraße

Show sight on map

From March to December 1933, the Papestraße SA prison was located in the basement of the Werner-Voss-Damm 54A building in the Tempelhof district of Berlin. This house was originally the building of the railway barracks in General Papp Street. The prison is a facility for SA field police. SA-Feldjägerkorps ("SA-Feldjägerkorps") was a special force formed within the National Socialist Sturmabteilung (SA) between 1933 and 1936. During 1933, some 500 known persons were held in SA prison in Papestraße. The unreported figure is likely to be much higher. About 30 of them died of abuse or ill-treatment. Their consequences.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

41. Dorfkirche Marienfelde

Show sight on map

The village church of Marienfelde in the Marienfelde district of Berlin is the center of the central village area. Traditionally, Kurt Pomplun claims that the Feldsteinkirche was built "around 1220" and thus "undoubtedly the oldest of all village churches in Berlin and one of the oldest in the middle mark". A roof beam found in 1995 was dendrochronologically dated to 1230; However, since it was in second use, the church can hardly have been created before 1240. Nevertheless, it is undoubtedly one of the oldest village churches in Berlin and the middle mark, where an older village church is certainly not known.

Wikipedia (DE)

42. Paulus-Kirche

Show sight on map

Pauluskirche in Gro-Lichterfelde was planned and built in brick Gothic style by Fritz Gottlob, one of the main advocates of this style. The construction cost is 250,000 marks. The church was built on February 2, 1862. It was completed on June 14th, 1900. After being destroyed during the Second World War, the church was rebuilt between 1951 and 1957 under the guidance of Erich Luz and Karl Strakbach. He was re-consecrated on March 3, 1957 by Bishop Otto Dibelius. In 1987, a large-scale renovation of the church was carried out under the plan of Peter Lehrecke. The church is now listed as a historical monument.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

43. Rüdesheimer Platz

Show sight on map

Rüdesheimer Square is located in Wilmsdorf District of Berlin, which is the center of Rheingao District. To the west of the square is Rüdesheimer Street and to the east is Ahrweilerstraße. The streets are named after towns and villages in the Rheingao-Taunus district of Hesse. Wilmersdorf District has cooperated with Rheingau-Taunus District since 1972 and has been a partnership since 1991. Since 1984, the partnership has also included vineyards at Wilmsdorf Stadium and grapes from Rheingau-Taunus, which winemakers use to make Wilmsdorf Rheingau pearls. The first harvest was in the autumn of 1986.

Wikipedia (DE)

44. Neues Museum

Show sight on map

The Neues Museum is a listed building on the Museum Island in the historic centre of Berlin and part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Built from 1843 to 1855 by order of King Frederick William IV of Prussia in Neoclassical and Renaissance Revival styles, it is considered as the major work of Friedrich August Stüler. After suffering damage in World War II and decay in East Germany, it was restored from 1999 to 2009 by David Chipperfield. Currently, the Neues Museum is home to the Ägyptisches Museum, the Papyrussammlung, the Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte and parts of the Antikensammlung.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

45. Köllnischer Park

Show sight on map
Köllnischer Park Manfred Brueckels / CC BY-SA 3.0

Köllnischer Park is a public park located near the River Spree in Mitte, Berlin. It is named after Cölln, one of the two cities which came together to form Berlin; the park location was originally just outside it. Approximately 1 hectare in area, the park came into existence in the 18th and 19th centuries on the site of fortifications. It was redesigned as a public park in 1869–73 and was further modified in the 20th century with the addition of first a bear enclosure, the Bärenzwinger, and later a permanent exhibition of sculpture, the Lapidary. The park is a registered Berlin landmark.

Wikipedia (EN)

46. Park am Gleisdreieck - Westpark

Show sight on map
Park am Gleisdreieck - Westpark Lienhard Schulz (picture). Grün Berlin GmbH, Bezirksamt Tempelhof-Schöneberg, Senatsverwaltung für Stadtentwicklung und Umwelt (Information board/map). / CC BY-SA 3.0

The park on the Gleisdreieck is a public green and relaxation system in Berlin. The approximately 31.5 hectare park is located on the fallow of the former hitchhiker and Potsdam freight station on the Gleisdreieck and extends from the Landwehr Canal across Yorckstraße to the Monumenten Bridge. The facility consists of three parking parts that were opened between 2011 and 2014: Ostpark in Kreuzberg, 17 hectares, opened on September 2, 2011, Westpark in Kreuzberg, 9 hectares, opened on May 31, 2013, Dora-Duncker-Park in Berlin-Schöneberg, 5.5 hectares, opened on March 21, 2014.

Wikipedia (DE)

47. St. Marienkirche

Show sight on map

St. Mary's Church, known in German as the Marienkirche, is a church in Berlin, Germany. It is located on Karl-Liebknecht-Straße in central Berlin, near Alexanderplatz. The exact age of the original church site and structure is not precisely known, but it was mentioned as the site of the alleged theft by Jews of the wafers in an act of Host Desecration in 1243. As a result of these charges, a number of Jews were burnt at the stake at a place later called Judenberg. It is also mentioned in German chronicles in 1292. It is presumed to date from earlier in the 13th century.

Wikipedia (EN), Heritage Website, Website

48. Hererostein

Show sight on map

Hererostein is a memorial stone at the Neukölln Columbiadamm cemetery in Berlin. It is dedicated to seven German Schutztrup volunteers who were killed in battle in Germany's southwestern African colonies between 1904 and 1907. After civil society organizations protested such commemorations of the perpetrators of the genocide, a comment board was laid on the ground in front of the stone in 2009 to honor the Herero and Nama victims. The ensemble of Hererostein and the Namibian Memorial Board is the only monument in Berlin commemorating the German occupation of Namibia.

Wikipedia (DE)

49. Berliner U-Bahn-Museum

Show sight on map

The U-Bahn-Museum in Berlin is part of the U-Bahn-Museum in Berlin. It opened on September 3, 1997 and is owned by the U-Bahn E Association in Berlin. It is the third subway museum in Europe, second only to Moscow and Budapest. The Berlin Metro Museum is located in the electromechanical lever interlocking system of Olympia Stadium, which operated from 1931 to 1983. Interlocked adjacent rooms are showrooms with many exhibits. In addition to the occasional photo exhibition, four to six special trips of the train type that are no longer running are organized every year.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

50. Mauermuseum

Show sight on map

The Checkpoint Charlie Museum is a private museum in Berlin. It is named after the famous crossing point on the Berlin Wall, and was created to document the so-called "best border security system in the world". On display are the photos and related documents of successful escape attempts from East Germany, together with the escape apparatus: hot-air balloons, getaway cars, chairlifts, and a mini-U-boat. The museum researches and maintains a list of deaths at the Berlin Wall. It is operated by the Mauermuseum-Betriebs gGmbH, and the director is Alexandra Hildebrandt.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

51. St. Petrus

Show sight on map

The St. Petrus Church in Bellermannstrasse 91 of the Berlin district of Gesundbrunnen, Mitte district, was built for the Catholic residents of the district. The draft in the neo -Gothic architectural style comes from the church architect Wilhelm Rincklake from the Maria Laach Abbey. Hermann Bunning had the construction management. The parish church is consecrated to the apostle Peter. The foundation stone was laid on December 16, 1906; On January 6, 1908, he was blessed liturgically. The consecration of the church took place on April 29, 1934. St. Peter is listed.

Wikipedia (DE)

52. Tränenpalast

Show sight on map
Tränenpalast
Franke, Klaus
/ CC BY-SA 3.0 de

The Tränenpalast is a former border crossing point between East and West Berlin, at Berlin Friedrichstraße station, which was in operation between 1962 and 1989. It is now a museum with exhibitions about Berlin during the Cold War period and about the process of German reunification. It was the border crossing for travellers on the S-bahn, U-bahn and trains going between East and West Germany. It was used only for westbound border crossings. It had separate checkpoints for West Berliners, West Germans, foreigners, diplomats, transit travellers and East Germans.

Wikipedia (EN)

53. Glaubenskirche

Show sight on map

The Church of Faith is a Protestant church in Friedrich-Franz-Straße in Berlin's Tempelhof district. The building was designed by the Charlottenburg architects Ferdinand Köhler and Paul Kranz, who had already taken over the construction of the Realgymnasium opposite. The three-aisled hall church built during the First World War can be attributed to contemporary reform architecture, the plastered masonry building in its external appearance does not require historicizing décor. The church, together with the rectories and the parish hall, is a listed building.

Wikipedia (DE)

54. Martin-Luther-Gedächtniskirche

Show sight on map
Martin-Luther-Gedächtniskirche Die Autorenschaft wurde nicht in einer maschinell lesbaren Form angegeben. Es wird Harald Rossa als Autor angenommen (basierend auf den Rechteinhaber-Angaben). / CC BY-SA 2.5

Martin-Luther-Gedächtniskirche, in Berlin's Mariendorf district, is a special monument and contemporary witness. It was built between 1933 and 1935, based on long-term planning. In the interior design, the symbolism of the state and the church is mixed together, which can still be seen today. For this reason, it has occasionally been called a "Nazi church" since 2004, when it made headlines for its poor architectural condition. In accordance with the 1933 zeitgeist, the municipal authorities treated the ruins of this design as monuments and monuments.

Wikipedia (DE)

55. Kleistgrab

Show sight on map

The small Wannsee is located in the south of the Berlin district of Steglitz-Zehlendorf in the Wannsee district, southwest of the Wannseebrücke. As part of the federal waterway Griebnitz Canal, which is legally part of the Teltow Canal, it represents the connection between the Großer Wannsee and the Pohlesee. It is delimited towards the Pohlesee through the Wehrhorn peninsula. The water flows mainly from the Teltow Canal over the small Wannsee into the Große Wannsee, but also vice versa. The waterway and shipping office Spree-Havel is responsible.

Wikipedia (DE)

56. Wasserturmplatz

Show sight on map

The water tower area is a place with a historic water tower in the Berlin district of Prenzlauer Berg near Kollwitzplatz and the Synagogue Rykestrasse. The water tower place is a listed monument protection as a garden monument. Furthermore, the listed building ensemble water tower, consisting of water tower, deep tank, riser pipe tower, machine house and swimmer houses is also located there. The water tower is the oldest still preserved tower in Berlin. In travel guides, the water tower is often referred to with the alternative name Dicker Hermann.

Wikipedia (DE)

57. Dorfkirche Schmargendorf

Show sight on map
Dorfkirche Schmargendorf Axel Mauruszat / Attribution

The village church of Schmargendorf is the church of the Evangelical Community of Alt-Schmargendorf. It is located in the Schmargendorf district of the Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf district on the corner of Breite Straße and Kirchstraße. The church dates from the end of the 13th century and was the only church in Schmargendorf until 1929. With a base area of 66 square meters and space for around 80 people, it is the smallest of the Berlin village churches preserved. The Alt-Schmargendorf cemetery is located in the immediate vicinity of the church.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

58. Kreuzberg

Show sight on map
Kreuzberg Otto Piltz / Public domain

The Kreuzberg is a hill in the Kreuzberg locality of Berlin, Germany, in former West Berlin. It rises about 66 m (217 ft) above the sea level. It was named by King Frederick William III of Prussia after the Iron Cross which crowns the top of the Prussian National Monument for the Liberation Wars, designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel, on its inauguration on 30 March 1821. On 27 September 1921 the borough assembly of the VIth borough of Berlin decided to name the borough after the hill. The borough was subsequently downgraded to a locality in 2001.

Wikipedia (EN)

59. Dorfkirche Friedrichsfelde Evangl. Paul-Gerhardt-Gemeinde

Show sight on map

The Protestant village church Friedrichsfelde is one of the oldest church buildings in the Berlin district of Lichtenberg and one of four places of worship of the Paul-Gerhardt-Gemeinde. It was built in place of a first village church from the second half of the 13th century. After heavy destruction in the Second World War, it was rebuilt in 1951/1952 and is a listed building. The church building is located on the corner of Alfred-Kowalke-Straße and Am Tierpark on the listed dorfanger in the Friedrichsfelder Kiez of the friedrichsfelde district.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

60. Kulturforum

Show sight on map

The Kulturforum is a collection of cultural buildings in Berlin. It was built up in the 1950s and 1960s at the edge of West Berlin, after most of the once unified city's cultural assets had been lost behind the Berlin Wall. The Kulturforum is characterized by its innovative modernist architecture; several buildings are distinguished by the organic designs of Hans Scharoun, and the Neue Nationalgalerie was designed by Mies van der Rohe. Today, the Kulturforum lies immediately to the west of the redeveloped commercial node of Potsdamer Platz.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

61. Evangelische Kirchengemeinde Jona

Show sight on map

The Evangelical Jona Church inaugurated on December 10, 1967, its name is the Prophet Jona from the Old Testament, is part of a building complex that is located at Roscherstraße 6 in the Charlottenburg district of the Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf district. The community center was designed in 1966-1967 as the branch church of the church on Lietzensee by Georg Lichtfuß. The municipalities of Jona and Grandmeister have been merged with the Evangelical parish of Halenseee since the beginning of January 2016, the Jonagemeinde no longer exists.

Wikipedia (DE)

62. Körnerpark

Show sight on map

The Körnerpark is situated in Berlin Neukölln between Jonasstraße, Schierker Straße, Selkestraße and Wittmannsdorfer Straße. The approximately 2.4 hectare park resembles a palace garden. The feature in the eastern part of the park is a cascade with fountains. Opposite, to the west, an orangery houses a café and a gallery for temporary exhibitions, and forms the boundary of the park. During summer weekends the forecourt of the orangery is used for free concerts and performances. The northern part is dominated by a flower garden.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

63. Portikus des zerstörten Anhalter Bahnhofs

Show sight on map
Portikus des zerstörten Anhalter Bahnhofs Hermann Rückwardt / Public domain

The Anhalter Bahnhof is a former railway terminus in Berlin, Germany, approximately 600 m (2,000 ft) southeast of Potsdamer Platz. Once one of Berlin's most important railway stations, it was severely damaged in World War II, and finally closed for traffic in 1952, when the GDR-owned Deutsche Reichsbahn rerouted all railway traffic between Berlin and places in the GDR avoiding the West Berlin area. The station's name lives on in the Berlin S-Bahn station of the same name, opened in October 1939 as part of the North-South S-Bahn link.

Wikipedia (EN)

64. Absturz eines sowjetischen Kampfflugzeugs 1966

Show sight on map

The Stößensee is a lake educated by a bay of the Havel in the Berlin districts of Spandau and Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf. It lies between the Pichelswerder and the Forst Grunewald and is around 350 meters wide and 1100 meters long. The forested high bank rises up to 35 meters to the Grunewald on Rupenhorn. There are numerous yacht and rowing clubs, sailing clubs, excursion bars and hotels around the lake. In the 19th century, the lake and its surroundings were one of the most popular excursion destinations for Spandauer and Berliner.

Wikipedia (DE)

65. Haus am Waldsee

Show sight on map

The house at the Waldsee in the Berlin district of Zehlendorf in the Steglitz-Zehlendorf district has been an exhibition location of international contemporary art with a focus on all media of visual arts, design, architecture and sound in Berlin since 1946. A sculpture park has been set up on the extensive terrain since 2005. From 2005 to 2021 the art historian Katja Blomberg held the management. In June 2022, art historian Anna Gritz, currently curator of the KW Institute for Contemporary Art, took over the management.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

66. Museumsdorf Düppel

Show sight on map

The Museumsdorf Düppel is a open-air museum located at the Krummes Fenn landscape protection area in Berlin-Nikolassee and founded in 1975, which belongs to the Berlin Stadtmuseum Foundation. His name refers to the surrounding location Düppel. An entire village together with its environment was reconstructed as it was said to have existed in the Middle Ages around 800 years ago. It develops into a place that is committed to participation and sustainability where life in the Middle Ages can be modeled and experienced.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

67. Die Pyramide

Show sight on map
Die Pyramide Andreas Steinhoff / Attribution

Die Pyramide is a high-rise building built in 1994/95 and located in the Berlin region of Marzahn-Hellersdorf, district of Marzahn, at the Rhinstraße / Landsberger Allee intersection. The office building and adjacent outbuildings have a combined floor space of 43,800 square metres. Die Pyramide was built by the Fundus-Gruppe real estate company of Düren and cost approximately €145 million to build. The official completion date was 17 January 1995. At a height of 100 meters, it is the tallest building in the suburb.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

68. Dorfkirche Lichterfelde

Show sight on map

Lichtfeld Protestant Village Church is one of more than 50 village churches in Berlin. The first simple hall church was built in the first half of the 14th century. Built in the early 19th century and made of less elaborate boulders, it was badly damaged during the Thirty Years War. In 1701, the church was restored as a stucco building. It got a semi-wooden roof tower, which was changed in 1735. In the following period, the church was rebuilt and expanded several times. This church is listed as a historical monument.

Wikipedia (DE)

69. Bröhan-Museum

Show sight on map

The Bröhan Museum is a Berlin state museum for Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Functionalism, located in Berlin's Charlottenburg district. The Museum is named after its founder, entrepreneur and art collector Karl. H. Bröhan (1921–2000), who donated his collection to the state of Berlin on the occasion of his 60th birthday. In 1983, the Bröhan Museum opened in its current space, which belongs to the Charlottenburg Palace ensemble and was originally built for the guard regiment. Since 1994, it has been a state museum.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

70. Jüdisches Museum

Show sight on map
Jüdisches Museum Stan Hema Agentur / Public domain

The Jewish Museum Berlin was opened in 2001 and is the largest Jewish museum in Europe. On 3,500 square metres of floor space, the museum presents the history of Jews in Germany from the Middle Ages to the present day, with new focuses and new scenography. It consists of three buildings, two of which are new additions specifically built for the museum by architect Daniel Libeskind. German-Jewish history is documented in the collections, the library and the archive, and is reflected in the museum's program of events.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

71. Nikolaikirche

Show sight on map

The St. Nikolai-Kirche, is the oldest church in Berlin, the capital of Germany. The church is located in the eastern part of central Berlin, the borough of Mitte. The area around the church, bounded by Spandauer Straße, Rathausstraße, the River Spree and Mühlendamm, is known as the Nikolaiviertel 'Nicholas quarter', and is an area of restored medieval buildings. The church was built between 1220 and 1230, and is thus, along with the Church of Our Lady at Alexanderplatz not far away, the oldest church in Berlin.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

72. Fichtebunker

Show sight on map

The Gasometer Fichtestrasse originally belonged to an ensemble of four gas tanks, the gas container station Fichtestrasse. The construction of 1883–1884 is the oldest surviving gasometer in Berlin and the only ones obtained from the only guns. During the Second World War it was converted into an air -raid shelter. In September 2006, the Berlin property fund sold the building to private investors who had apartments built on the roof of the gasometer until spring 2010. The building and the outbuildings are listed.

Wikipedia (DE)

73. Umspannwerk Humboldt

Show sight on map

The Humboldt substation is a monument in the Berlin district of Prenzlauer Berg. It was built from 1924 to 1926 by the architects Hans Heinrich Müller and Felix Thümen for the Berlin Städtische Elektrizitätswerke Aktiengesellschaft (Bewag). It stayed in operation until 1993. The building is one of the architectural -historical testimonials of Berlin's industrial history. It is located in the Gleimviertel at the Copenhagener Straße/Sonnenburger Straße intersection and is now used as a commercial building.

Wikipedia (DE)

74. Quartierspark Rosenfelder Ring

Show sight on map
Quartierspark Rosenfelder Ring Angela M. Arnold, Berlin (=44penguins) / CC BY-SA 3.0

Rosenfeld Ring Park is a park in the Lichtenberg district of Berlin-Friedrichsfield district. It was built in two phases after the demolition of a school building linked to adjacent sports and green spaces, and a civic survey was conducted on behalf of the regional office. It spans three terraces. With the completion of the upper area, the new park was opened on May 5, 1975. It was completed within the framework of Kiezfest on June 14, 2010. The middle and lower classes officially handed over on January 28th.

Wikipedia (DE)

75. Volkspark am Weinberg

Show sight on map

The Volkspark am Weinberg is the only Volkspark in Berlin's Mitte locality in the district of the same name and covers an area of 4.3 hectares. It is bordered by Weinbergsweg to the southeast, Brunnenstraße to the southwest, Veteranenstraße to the northwest and Fehrbelliner Straße to the northeast. The name Weinberg (vineyard) goes back to the vineyards that formerly occupied the hill on which the park is now situated. Since the late 1970s, the park has been designated as a garden monument (Gartendenkmal).

Wikipedia (EN)

76. Pergamonmuseum

Show sight on map

The Pergamon Museum is a listed building on the Museum Island in the historic centre of Berlin and part of the UNESCO World Heritage. It was built from 1910 to 1930 by order of German Emperor Wilhelm II according to plans by Alfred Messel and Ludwig Hoffmann in Stripped Classicism style. Currently, the Pergamon Museum is home to the Antikensammlung including the famous Pergamon Altar, the Vorderasiatisches Museum and the Museum für Islamische Kunst. Parts of the building are closed for renovation until 2025.

Wikipedia (EN), Description, Website

77. Gendarmenmarkt

Show sight on map
Gendarmenmarkt Thomas Huntke, Germany (der Uploader) http://www.huntke.de / CC BY-SA 3.0

The Gendarmenmarkt is a square in Berlin and the site of an architectural ensemble including the Berlin concert hall and the French and German Churches. In the centre of the square stands a monumental statue of poet Friedrich Schiller. The square was created by Johann Arnold Nering at the end of the seventeenth century as the Linden-Markt and reconstructed by Georg Christian Unger in 1773. The Gendarmenmarkt is named after the cuirassier regiment Gens d'Armes, which had stables at the square until 1773.

Wikipedia (EN)

78. Jute-Lofts

Show sight on map

The factory building of the German Jute spinning and weaving in Potsdam is a clinker structure on the Nutheufer in the Potsdam district of Nowawes. It was built in 1863 and then expanded several times. From 2014 it was renovated after years of decay and the former workshop and the machine house were converted into the Jute-Loft residential complex until 2017. The building is under monument protection and is one of the oldest preserved buildings of the Jutespin industry on the European mainland.

Wikipedia (DE), Heritage Website, Website

79. Flensburger Löwe

Show sight on map
Flensburger Löwe Marvin Radke (Ichwarsnur) / CC BY-SA 4.0

The Idstedt Lion is a late classicist monument in Flensburg. The Danish sculptor Herman Wilhelm Bissen created it in 1862 to commemorate the victory of the Danish troops over the rebellious Schleswig-Holsteiners in the Battle of Idstedt (1850). After the Peace of Vienna (1864), the sculpture was brought to Berlin. In 1945 she arrived in Copenhagen. It returned to its original location in Flensburg in 2011 and was unveiled on 10 September 2011. A zinc copy from 1874 stands at Wannsee in Berlin.

Wikipedia (DE)

80. Sankt Martin

Show sight on map

The Roman Catholic Church of St. Martin, located in Wilhelmsruher Damm 144-144B, Märkisches Viertel, Reinickendorf, Berlin, is listed as a historical monument. Built in 1972/1973, it was designed by Werner Dutman and has a concrete structure. Fair-faced concrete is a formative design means; By emphasizing the surface finish of concrete materials, the building is associated with the architectural direction of barbarism in art history, and therefore a concise example of postwar modernism.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

81. Luisenkirche

Show sight on map

The Luisenkirche is a Protestant municipal and parish church in Charlottenburg, now part of Berlin, Germany. The building in Baroque style was begun in 1710, and around 100 years later named after Queen Luise of Prussia. Karl Friedrich Schinkel made suggestions for the addition of a steeple and interior changes in 1821, which were partly carried out from 1823. The Luisenkirche burnt in World War II and was rebuilt in the 1950s. A restoration in 1987/88 revived some of Schinkel's design.

Wikipedia (EN)

82. 1. Berliner DDR Motorrad-Museum

Show sight on map

The GDR Museum: Motorbine is a museum for two -wheelers from the German Democratic Republic in Berlin. It is located under the S-Bahnbögen between Alexanderplatz and Hackeschen Markt. It was opened on September 27, 2008 and has since presented over 130 motorcycles, scooters and mopeds from the manufacturer MZ, Simson, IWL and EMW/BMW on an area of around 800 square meters. Since September 1, 2021, the motorcycle exhibition is officially part of the collection of the DDR Museum Berlin.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

83. Alter Markt

Show sight on map

The Old Market Square is a centrally located square in downtown Potsdam which forms the historical centre of the city. The square consists of the area around St. Nicholas' Church. Today the term refers in particular to the area directly in front of the church. It is bordered by several prestigious historical buildings. The square has been the site of much architectural reconstruction work in recent years which has restored much historic building fabric that was lost in World War Two.

Wikipedia (EN), Heritage Website

84. Platz der Luftbrücke

Show sight on map

Platz der Luftbrücke is a landmarked square and transport node in Berlin, Germany, on the border between the localities of Tempelhof and Kreuzberg. The entrance to the former Tempelhof International Airport is on the square. The buildings around the square are now mostly government agencies, in particular police headquarters. The name of the square commemorates the Berlin airlift of 1948/49 in which Tempelhof was the main airfield used; the Berlin Airlift Monument is in the square.

Wikipedia (EN)

85. Johann-Sebastian-Bach-Kirche

Show sight on map

The Evangelical Johann-Sebastian Bach Church was created between 1980 and 1981 according to Deschen from Reinhold Barwich. It represents the building style of postmodern architecture and is located in Lucerne Strasse 10–12 in the Berlin district of Lichterfelde of the Steglitz-Zehlendorf district. The parish belongs to the Steglitz church district in the Sprengel Berlin of the Evangelical Church in Berlin-Brandenburg-Silesian Upper Lusatia and comprises around 3,000 parishioners.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

86. Dorfkirche Lietzow

Show sight on map

The Evangelical Church of Alt-Lietzow is a Protestant church in the former town of Lietzow, today part of Berlin-Charlottenburg. It is the fifth church on this site, whose predecessor buildings were demolished after partial damage. The current church complex, built according to designs by the architect Ludolf von Walthausen, was consecrated in 1961. It belongs to the Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf church district of the Evangelical Church Berlin-Brandenburg-Silesian Upper Lusatia.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

87. Ernst-Thälmann-Denkmal

Show sight on map

The Ernst Thälmann Monument, located at Greifswalder Straße in Berlin's Prenzrauerberg district, is a huge statue commemorating Ernst Thälmann, leader of the German Communist Party. It was created by Soviet sculptor Lev Kerber. It was inaugurated on April 4, 1986 at Ernst-Thälmann-Parkanlage (Ernst-Thälmann-Parkanlage). The next day, on the centenary of Tellman's birth, the eleventh began. The party congress of the German Socialist Solidarity Party (SED) held in Berlin.

Wikipedia (DE)

88. Fichtenberg

Show sight on map

At 68 meters over NHN, the Fichtenberg is the highest elevation in the Berlin district of Steglitz. It lies between Schloßstraße and botanical garden. The village of Steglitz, which was later mentioned in 1242, developed around the mountain, which was later called Steglitz. The mountain was called Kiefernberg until around 1900. The term Steglitzer Fichtenberg, on the other hand, was common for the hills to the east of the village, which were later called Rauhe mountains.

Wikipedia (DE)

89. Dorfkirche Gatow

Show sight on map

Gatow Village Church is one of more than 50 protected village churches in Berlin. It has been a Protestant since the Brandenburg Reformation in 1539 and is still used in worship today. The church, located in what is now Berlin's Gato district, was rebuilt or restored several times in 1741, 1816, 1844, 1913 and 1935, as can be seen from its exterior. Its origin can be traced back to the 14th century. However, the year 1350 on the weather vane of 1953 is arbitrarily chosen.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

90. Bundeskanzleramt

Show sight on map

The Federal Chancellery in Berlin is the official seat of the chancellor of Germany as well as their executive office, the German Chancellery. As part of the move of the German Federal Government from Bonn to Berlin, the office moved into the new building planned by the architects Axel Schultes and Charlotte Frank. The building, which is the largest government headquarters in the world, is part of the "Federal Belt" in the Spreebogen, Willy-Brandt-Straße 1, 10557 Berlin.

Wikipedia (EN), Description, Website

91. Schiller-Denkmal

Show sight on map

The Schiller Monument is located in central Berlin (Berlin-Mitte) on Gendarmenmarkt, in front of the flight of steps leading up to the former royal theater, today a concert hall. It honors the poet, philosopher and historian Friedrich Schiller, who is also regarded as one of the most significant dramatists and lyricists of the German language. The set of statues was executed by Reinhold Begas a prominent 19th-century German sculptor. It is a registered historic monument.

Wikipedia (EN)

92. Murellenberg

Show sight on map

Murellenberge, Murellenschlucht and Schanzenwald are ice-age hilly landscapes of Weichsel at Ruhleben at the western end of Berlin's Charlottenburg-Wilmsdorf district. The area lies to the west of the Olympic venues. Much of the area has been designated as the Murellenschlucht and Schanzenwald Nature Reserves, belonging to the biome network of Ruhleben, Tiefwerder Wiesen and Grunewald. The Murellenteich Natural Monument is located about 11.2 km northeast of the region.

Wikipedia (DE)

93. Mahnmal für die im Nationalsozialismus verfolgten Juden in Spandau

Show sight on map
Mahnmal für die im Nationalsozialismus verfolgten Juden in Spandau OTFW, Berlin / CC BY-SA 3.0

Spandau Synagogue was a synagogue at 12 Lindenufer in the Old Town area of Spandau, Berlin, Germany. It was also known as Spandauer Vereinssynagoge. The synagogue was built in 1894–95 and was destroyed on 9 November 1938 (Kristallnacht) when it was set on fire. The ruins were removed, probably in 1942. The site is now marked by a memorial tablet, installed in 1988. The congregation maintained a Jewish cemetery, on Spandau's Neue Bergstrasse, which was closed in 1940.

Wikipedia (EN)

94. Urania-Weltzeituhr

Show sight on map

The World Clock, also known as the Urania World Clock, is a large turret-style world clock located in the public square of Alexanderplatz in Mitte, Berlin. By reading the markings on its metal rotunda, the current time in 148 major cities from around the world can be determined. Since its erection in 1969, it has become a tourist attraction and meeting place. In July 2015, the German government declared the clock as a historically and culturally significant monument.

Wikipedia (EN)

95. Wandervogel Gedenkstein

Show sight on map
Wandervogel Gedenkstein
Unknown authorUnknown author
/ CC BY-SA 3.0 de

Wandervogel is the name adopted by a popular movement of German youth groups from 1896 to 1933, who protested against industrialization by going to hike in the country and commune with nature in the woods. Drawing influence from medieval wandering scholars, their ethos was to revive old Teutonic values, with a strong emphasis on German nationalism. According to historians, a major contribution of the Wandervögel was the revival of folk songs in wider German society.

Wikipedia (EN)

96. Gedenkstätte der Sozialisten

Show sight on map

The Socialist Memorial is a grave and memorial within the Friedrichsfelde Central Cemetery in Berlin. The complex, which was officially inaugurated in 1951, together with the adjacent Pergolenweg grave complex during the GDR, served as a cemetery of honour for people who had rendered outstanding services to the socialist idea. It follows the tradition of the Friedrichsfelde cemetery as a burial place of the workers' movement, which began in the late 19th century.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

97. St. Antonius & St. Shenouda Kirche

Show sight on map
St. Antonius & St. Shenouda Kirche Angela Monika Arnold / CC BY-SA 2.0 de

Glaubenskirche is a former Protestant church built between 1903 and 1905 in the Lichtenberg district of Berlin, now Roedeliusplatz. As early as 1980s, East Berlin magistrates listed it as a historical site. The building has been the property of the Coptic Church since 1998, which is gradually rebuilding, developing the church as the seat of Coptic bishops and transforming it into a universal center. The church was renamed St. Anthony and St. Shenouda Church.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

98. Evangelisch-Lutherische Kirche

Show sight on map

The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Berlin, Annenstraäe 52/53, is a place of worship of an independent Evangelical Lutheran Church (SELK) located in the Luisenstadt district of Mitte in Berlin. It is the first church of the Evangelical Lutheran Church (Old Lutheran Church) in the city. The diocese belongs to the Berlin-Brandenburg Church District. The church, also known as Annenkirche, is a listed architectural monument due to its location in Annenstra ® e.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

99. Musikinstrumenten-Museum

Show sight on map
Musikinstrumenten-Museum Photo: Andreas Praefcke / CC BY 3.0

The Berlin Musical Instrument Museum is located at the Kulturforum on Tiergartenstraße in Berlin, Germany. The Museum holds over 3,500 musical instruments from the 16th century onward and is one of the largest and most representative musical instrument collections in Germany. Objects include a portable harpsichord once owned by Prussia’s Queen Sophie Charlotte, flutes from the collection of Frederick the Great, and Benjamin Franklin’s glass harmonica.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

100. Museum Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf in der Villa Oppenheim

Show sight on map

Villa Oppenheim, also Villa Sorgfrei, in Berlin's Schloßstraße in the Charlottenburg district is a villa built in the 19th century in the style of the Neorenaissance, which was served as a residential building until 1911. After that there was a change of ownership and usage and from 1995 to 2009 a Museum of Contemporary Art. Since 2012, the villa has been used as a home and historical museum of today's Berlin districts of Charlottenburg and Wilmersdorf.

Wikipedia (DE), Website

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.