9 Sights in Reims, France (with Map and Images)

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Here you can find interesting sights in Reims, France. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 9 sights are available in Reims, France.

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1. Statue Baptème de Clovis

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Statue Baptème de Clovis Maître de Saint Gilles / Public domain

Clovis' baptism is a sacrament symbolizing the conversion of King Clovis I of Frank to Christianity. The service was held by Bishop Remy on Christmas Eve, December 24 or 25, at the church's Baptist Hall, which, according to almost identical tradition, is on the original site of Reims Cathedral, with an uncertain date, causing controversy among historians. Historiography, according to the history of the Franks of Gregory in Tours, for a long time the date was Christmas 496 after the Battle of Torbiak, but according to most historians the date was more likely to be between 498 or 499, although some tended to convert after 505 or 508.

Wikipedia (FR)

2. Borne Vauthier

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Western Front demarcation stones, also known as Bornes du Front and Bornes Vauthier, are monuments erected in France and Belgium to mark the limit of the German advance during the First World War. The stones were the idea of sculptor Paul Moreau-Vauthier, a veteran of the war, and were erected between 1921 and 1930. The total number of stones erected is unclear but it is thought that there were 118 official stones, of which 93 survive. The stones identify the army that held that sector in 1918 and are engraved with the text "Here the invader was brought to a standstill 1918" in English, Dutch, and French.

Wikipedia (EN)

3. Ancien Collège des Jésuites

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The former Jesuit College of Reims is a 16th century building located in Reims in the Marne, a French department in the Champagne area of the Grand Est region. Founded in 1608 by Jesuits, the college was closed in 1762 when the Jesuits were banished from France. The buildings were used for other educational projects during the 19th century. Since 1976 they have belonged to the City of Reims, which has used it to provide a space for various regional and international organisations. Its library and refectory are recognised monuments of Baroque art.

Wikipedia (EN)

4. Palais du Tau

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The Palace of Tau in Reims, France, was the palace of the Archbishop of Reims. It is associated with the kings of France, whose coronation was held in the nearby cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims and the following coronation banquet in the palace itself. Because of its historical importance for the French monarchy, the Palace of Tau was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1991. Today, it serves to host cultural events for the city of Reims. In recent years it has been the setting for Sciences Po Paris's RIMUN association's annual gala.

Wikipedia (EN), Website

5. Jeanne d'Arc

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Jeanne d'Arc
AnonymousUnknown author
/ Public domain

After the French lifted the siege of Orléans and won a decisive victory at the Battle of Patay, the English and Burgundians no longer posed a threat. Joan of Arc convinced the Dauphin Charles to go to Reims for his coronation. Successfully marching their army though the heart of territory held by the hostile Burgundians solidified the Dauphin’s grasp on the throne of France. He had been disinherited from it through the Treaty of Troyes.

Wikipedia (EN)

6. Basilique Saint-Remi

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The Basilica of Saint-Remi is a medieval abbey church in Reims, France. It was founded in the 11th century "over the chapel of St. Christophe where St. Remi was buried." It is "the largest Romanesque church in northern France, though with later additions." The church has been a monument historique since 1840, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1991 as a part of Cathedral of Notre-Dame, former Abbey of Saint-Remi and Palace of Tau.

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7. Église Saint-Nicaise

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In Reims, the Church of Saint Nichols is a parish church built in the 1920s in the Roman-Byzantine garden city. It was designed by architect Jean-Marcel Obertin and decorated by famous artists of the time: Maurice Dennis, Roger de Villiers, Gustav Giormes, Emma Tiolier, Jean Burke, Rene Lalik, Jacques Simon, Ernest Laurent. It is listed as a "historical monument".

Wikipedia (FR)

8. Ruines du couvent des Cordeliers

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The Cordeliers de Reims convent is a former Franciscan convent of the French commune of Reims, dating from the Middle Ages. These remains since the end of the First World War have been a square which made the corner of the Voltaire, Troisinets and Isle streets and faces the Voltaire school.

Wikipedia (FR)

9. Vestiges du Couvent des Jacobins

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Lance Jacobin Abbey is an ancient Dominican monastery in the French city of Lance, then known as Jacobin Abbey, dating back to the Middle Ages. Since the end of the First World War, the ruins have been a square between Sinkema Street and Jacobin Street.

Wikipedia (FR)

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