36 Sights in Hyde Park Township, United States (with Map and Images)

Here you can find interesting sights in Hyde Park Township, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 36 sights are available in Hyde Park Township, United States.

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1. Monument to Great Northern Migration

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Monument to Great Northern Migration United States Bureau of the Census. / Public domain

The Great Migration, sometimes known as the Great Northward Migration or the Black Migration, was the movement of six million African Americans out of the rural Southern United States to the urban Northeast, Midwest, and West between 1910 and 1970. It was caused primarily by the poor economic conditions for African American people, as well as the prevalent racial segregation and discrimination in the Southern states where Jim Crow laws were upheld. In particular, continued lynchings motivated a portion of the migrants, as African Americans searched for social reprieve. The historic change brought by the migration was amplified because the migrants, for the most part, moved to the then-largest cities in the United States at a time when those cities had a central cultural, social, political, and economic influence over the United States. There, African Americans established influential communities of their own. Despite the loss of leaving their homes in the South, and all the barriers faced by the migrants in their new homes, the migration was an act of individual and collective agency, which changed the course of American history, a "declaration of independence" written by their actions.

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2. Statue of the Republic

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Statue of the Republic J. Crocker Sculptor: Daniel Chester French ; / Public domain

The Statue of The Republic is a 24-foot-high (7.3 m) gilded bronze sculpture in Jackson Park, Chicago, Illinois by Daniel Chester French. The colossal original statue, a centerpiece of the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893, was destroyed by fire. The present statue is a smaller-scale replica, sculpted by the same artist, which was erected in 1918 in commemoration of both the 25th anniversary of the Exposition and the Illinois' statehood centennial. The statue is now located on the south end of the park at the intersection of East Hayes and South Richards Drive, adjacent the golf course and approximately where the exposition's Administration Building and Electricity Building once stood. The statue was funded by the Benjamin Ferguson Fund, which commissioned French to cast this recreation of the original 65-foot-tall (20 m) statue that stood on the grounds of the Exposition of 1893. Edith Minturn Stokes served as French's model for the original statue. Henry Bacon, the architect of the Lincoln Memorial, designed the festooned pedestal for the replica statue.

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3. Harold Washington Park

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Harold Washington Park is a small park in the Chicago Park District located in the Hyde Park community area on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, USA. In 1992, it was named for lawyer, state legislator, U. S. congressman, Hyde Park resident, and the first African American Chicago Mayor Harold Washington (1922–1987). The Park District officially calls the park Harold Washington Playlot Park with a designated address of 5200 S. Hyde Park Blvd Chicago, IL 60615. It is one of 4 Chicago Park District parks named after persons surnamed Washington. It is one of 40 Chicago Park District parks named after influential African Americans. The Park is bounded by East 53rd Street on the south, South Hyde Park Boulevard on the west, and Lake Shore Drive to the east. Architecturally, it is flanked to the north by Regents Park and The Hampton House to the south. In addition its southwest corner opposes two National Register of Historic Places Properties.

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4. Hamilton Park

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Hamilton Park is a public park at 513 W. 72nd Street in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois. The park opened in 1904 as part of a plan led by the South Park Commission to add small neighborhood parks on Chicago's South Side. It was the first public park in Englewood. Landscape designers the Olmsted Brothers and architecture firm D. H. Burnham & Company collaborated on the park's design. The park opened with a fieldhouse, baseball field, wading pool, and walkways; within the decade, the designers added gymnasiums, a playground, and tennis courts. The fieldhouse has a Beaux-Arts design, and its inside features several murals of prominent figures in American history. The park was heavily used after it opened, and the fieldhouse in particular was booked so consistently that it was expanded in the 1920s.

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5. 1919 Race Riot Plaque

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The Chicago race riot of 1919 was a violent racial conflict started by white Americans against black Americans that began on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, on July 27 and ended on August 3, 1919. During the riot, 38 people died. Over the week, injuries attributed to the episodic confrontations stood at 537, with two thirds of the injured being black and one third white, and approximately 1,000 to 2,000, most of whom were black, lost their homes. Due to its sustained violence and widespread economic impact, it is considered the worst of the scores of riots and civil disturbances across the United States during the "Red Summer" of 1919, so named because of the racial and labor violence and fatalities. The prolonged conflict made it one of the worst riots in the history of Illinois.

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6. Fountain of Time

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Fountain of Time Photograph: Conrad Lee ; Sculpture: Lorado Taft (1860–1936); / Public domain

Fountain of Time, or simply Time, is a sculpture by Lorado Taft, measuring 126 feet 10 inches (38.66 m) in length, situated at the western edge of the Midway Plaisance within Washington Park in Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. The sculpture is inspired by Henry Austin Dobson's poem "Paradox of Time". Its 100 figures passing before Father Time were created as a monument to the 100 years of peace between the United States and the United Kingdom following the Treaty of Ghent in 1814. Father Time faces the 100 from across a water basin. The fountain's water was turned on in 1920, and the sculpture was dedicated in 1922. It is a contributing structure to the Washington Park United States Registered Historic District, which is a National Register of Historic Places listing.

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7. Mayor Harold Washington

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Mayor Harold Washington US Federal Government / Public domain

Harold Lee Washington was an American lawyer and politician who was the 51st Mayor of Chicago. Washington became the first African American to be elected as the city's mayor in April 1983. He served as mayor from April 29, 1983 until his death on November 25, 1987. Born in Chicago and raised in the Bronzeville neighborhood, Washington became involved in local 3rd Ward politics under Chicago Alderman and future Congressman Ralph Metcalfe after graduating from Roosevelt University and Northwestern University School of Law. Washington was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from 1981 to 1983, representing Illinois's first district. Washington had previously served in the Illinois State Senate and the Illinois House of Representatives from 1965 until 1976.

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8. Enrico Fermi

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Enrico Fermi Department of Energy. Office of Public Affairs / Public domain

Enrico Fermi was an Italian physicist and the creator of the world's first nuclear reactor, the Chicago Pile-1. He has been called the "architect of the nuclear age" and the "architect of the atomic bomb". He was one of very few physicists to excel in both theoretical physics and experimental physics. Fermi was awarded the 1938 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on induced radioactivity by neutron bombardment and for the discovery of transuranium elements. With his colleagues, Fermi filed several patents related to the use of nuclear power, all of which were taken over by the US government. He made significant contributions to the development of statistical mechanics, quantum theory, and nuclear and particle physics.

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9. Paul Cornell

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Paul Cornell TonyTheTiger at en.wikipedia / Public domain

Paul Cornell was an American lawyer and Chicago real estate speculator who founded the Hyde Park Township that included most of what are now known as the south and far southeast sides of Chicago in Cook County, Illinois, United States. He turned the south side Lake Michigan lakefront area, especially the Hyde Park community area and neighboring Kenwood and Woodlawn neighborhoods, into a resort community that had its heyday from the 1850s through the early 20th century. He was also an urban planner who paved the way for and preserved many of the parks that are now in the Chicago Park District. Additionally, he was a successful entrepreneur with interests in manufacturing, cemeteries, and hotels.

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10. Washington Park

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Washington Park Night Ranger / CC BY 2.5

Washington Park is a 372-acre (1.5 km2) park between Cottage Grove Avenue and Martin Luther King Drive, located at 5531 S. Martin Luther King Dr. in the Washington Park community area on the South Side of Chicago. It was named for President George Washington in 1880. Washington Park is the largest of four Chicago Park District parks named after persons surnamed Washington. Located in the park is the DuSable Museum of African American History. This park was the proposed site of the Olympic Stadium and the Olympic swimming venue for Chicago's bid to host the 2016 Summer Olympics. Washington Park was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 20, 2004.

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11. First Church of Deliverance

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First Church of Deliverance Zol87 from Chicago, IL USA / CC BY-SA 2.0

First Church of Deliverance is a landmark Spiritual church located at 4315 South Wabash Avenue in Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. First Church of Deliverance was founded by Reverend Clarence H. Cobbs on May 8, 1929. The church began with nine members and held its first service in the basement of his mother's home located in the Bronzeville area on the south side of Chicago. The church was built in 1939 by Walter T. Bailey, and two towers were added to it in 1946 by Kocher, Buss & DeKlerk. It is a rare example of the Streamline Moderne design being used for a house of worship, and was designated a Chicago Landmark on October 5, 1994.

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12. Mosque Maryam

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Mosque Maryam Zol87 from Chicago, IL, USA / CC BY-SA 4.0

Mosque Maryam, also known as Muhammad Mosque #2 or Temple #2, is the headquarters of the Nation of Islam, located in Chicago, Illinois. It is at 7351 South Stony Island Avenue in the South Shore neighborhood. Louis Farrakhan's headquarters are on the premises. The building was originally the Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church before it relocated to suburban Palos Hills. Elijah Muhammad purchased the building in 1972. Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi had also lent Elijah Muhammad, his predecessor as head of the Nation of Islam, $3 million to convert the former Greek Orthodox church in Chicago into the Mosque Maryam.

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13. Midway Plaisance

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Midway Plaisance / Public domain

The Midway Plaisance, known locally as the Midway, is a public park on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois. It is one mile long by 220 yards wide and extends along 59th and 60th streets, joining Washington Park at its west end and Jackson Park at its east end. It divides the Hyde Park community area to the north from the Woodlawn community area to the south. Near Lake Michigan, the Midway is about 6 miles (10 km) south of the downtown "Loop". Today, the Midway runs through the southern portion of the University of Chicago campus, with university and related buildings fronting it on both sides.

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14. Chinese American Museum of Chicago

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The Chinese American Museum of Chicago (CAMOC) seeks to advance the appreciation of Chinese American culture through exhibitions, education, and research and to preserve the past, present, and future of Chinese Americans primarily in the American Midwest. The museum opened in 2005 in Chicago's Chinatown neighborhood. Although it suffered a damaging fire in 2008, it reopened its renovated quarters, the Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center, in 2010. CAMOC is governed by the Board of Directors of the Chinatown Museum Foundation (CMF), a 501(C)(3) non-profit corporation located in Chicago, Illinois.

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15. George Washington Memorial

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George Washington Memorial Gilbert Stuart / Public domain

George Washington was an American military officer, statesman, and Founding Father who served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797. Appointed by the Continental Congress as commander of the Continental Army, Washington led the Patriot forces to victory in the American Revolutionary War and served as the president of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, which created the Constitution of the United States and the American federal government. Washington has been called the "Father of the Nation" for his manifold leadership in the formative days of the country.

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16. Stony Island Arts Bank

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The Stony Island Trust and Savings Bank Building is a historic bank building at 6760 S. Stony Island Avenue in the South Shore neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois. The building opened in 1923 for the Stony Island Trust and Savings Bank, which was founded in 1917 and had outgrown its first building. The bank was one of Chicago's many neighborhood banks in the early twentieth century; as Illinois law at the time barred banks from opening branches, smaller standalone banks provided the residents and businesses of Chicago's outlying neighborhoods with nearby banking services.

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17. Museum of Science and Industry

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Museum of Science and Industry Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

The Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) is a science museum located in Chicago, Illinois, in Jackson Park, in the Hyde Park neighborhood between Lake Michigan and The University of Chicago. It is housed in the former Palace of Fine Arts from the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. Initially endowed by Julius Rosenwald, the Sears, Roebuck and Company president and philanthropist, it was supported by the Commercial Club of Chicago and opened in 1933 during the Century of Progress Exposition.

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18. DuSable Museum of African-American History

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DuSable Museum of African-American History The original uploader was TonyTheTiger at English Wikipedia.
(Original text: en:User:TonyTheTiger) / CC-BY-SA-3.0

The DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago is dedicated to the study and conservation of African-American history, culture, and art. It was founded in 1961 by Margaret Taylor-Burroughs, her husband Charles Burroughs, Gerard Lew, Eugene Feldman, Bernard Goss, Marian M. Hadley, and others. They established the museum to celebrate black culture, at the time overlooked by most museums and academic establishments. The museum has an affiliation with the Smithsonian Institution.

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19. Staples Family

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Staples Family In upper left corner of the page is the notation that this section was sponsored by friends and associated of Soul Train. This separates it from any Billboard editorial content. / Public domain

The Staple Singers were an American gospel, soul, and R&B singing group. Roebuck "Pops" Staples, the patriarch of the family, formed the group with his children Cleotha, Pervis, and Mavis. Yvonne replaced her brother when he was drafted into the U. S. Army, and again in 1970. They are best known for their 1970s hits "Respect Yourself", "I'll Take You There", "If You're Ready ", and "Let's Do It Again". While the family name is Staples, the group used "Staple" commercially.

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20. Hadiya Pendleton Park

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The murder of Hadiya Pendleton occurred on January 29, 2013. Pendleton, a 15-year-old Black girl from Chicago, Illinois, was shot in the back and killed while standing with friends inside Harsh Park in Kenwood, Chicago after taking her final exams. As a student at King College Prep High School, she was killed only one week after performing at events for President Barack Obama’s second inauguration. First Lady Michelle Obama attended the funeral for Pendleton in Chicago.

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21. Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church

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Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church Historic American Building Survey / Public domain

Quinn Chapel AME Church, also known as Quinn Chapel of the A. M. E. Church, houses Chicago's first African-American congregation, formed by seven individuals as a nondenominational prayer group that met in the house of a member in 1844. In 1847, the group organized as a congregation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the first independent black denomination in the United States. They named the church for Bishop William Paul Quinn.

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22. Chess Studio

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Chess Records was an American record company established in 1950 in Chicago, specializing in blues and rhythm and blues. It was the successor to Aristocrat Records, founded in 1947. It expanded into soul music, gospel music, early rock and roll, and jazz and comedy recordings, released on the Chess and its subsidiary labels Checker and Argo/Cadet. The Chess catalogue is owned by Universal Music Group and managed by Geffen Records.

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23. Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ

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Emmett Louis Till was a 14-year-old African American boy who was abducted, tortured and lynched in Mississippi in 1955, after being accused of offending a white woman in her family's grocery store. The brutality of his murder and the fact that his killers were acquitted drew attention to the long history of violent persecution of African Americans in the United States. Till posthumously became an icon of the civil rights movement.

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24. Frederick C. Robie House

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The Frederick C. Robie House is a U. S. National Historic Landmark now on the campus of the University of Chicago in the South Side neighborhood of Hyde Park in Chicago, Illinois. Built between 1909 and 1910, the building was designed as a single family home by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. It is considered perhaps the finest example of Prairie School, the first architectural style considered uniquely American.

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25. Paul Laurence Dunbar Monument

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Paul Laurence Dunbar Monument The African-American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920, / Public domain

Paul Laurence Dunbar was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Dayton, Ohio, to parents who had been enslaved in Kentucky before the American Civil War, Dunbar began writing stories and verse when he was a child. He published his first poems at the age of 16 in a Dayton newspaper, and served as president of his high school's literary society.

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26. Rockefeller Memorial Chapel

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Rockefeller Chapel is a Gothic Revival chapel on the campus of the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois. A monumental example of Collegiate Gothic architecture, it was meant by patron John D. Rockefeller to be the "central and dominant feature" of the campus; at 200.7 feet it is by covenant the tallest building on campus and seats 1700. The current dean is Maurice Charles, an Episcopal priest.

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27. Gotthold Ephraim Lessing

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Gotthold Ephraim Lessing Anna Rosina de Gasc / Public domain

Gotthold Ephraim Lessing was a German writer, philosopher, dramatist, publicist and art critic, and a representative of the Enlightenment era. His plays and theoretical writings substantially influenced the development of German literature. He is widely considered by theatre historians to be the first dramaturg in his role at Abel Seyler's Hamburg National Theatre.

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28. Amos Blakemore (Junior Wells)

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Junior Wells was an American singer, harmonica player, and recording artist. He is best known for his signature song "Messin' with the Kid" and his 1965 album Hoodoo Man Blues, described by the critic Bill Dahl as "one of the truly classic blues albums of the 1960s". Wells himself categorized his music as rhythm and blues.

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29. Armour Square Park

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Armour Square Park Olmsted Brothers, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Frances Loeb Library / Public domain

Armour Square Park, also known as Armour Square or Park No. 3, is a park in Chicago, Illinois featuring Beaux Arts architecture, designed by D. H. Burnham and the Olmsted Brothers. The park was opened in March 1905, at a cost of $220,000. It was named after Philip Danforth Armour, philanthropist and captain of industry.

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30. First Unitarian Church of Chicago

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First Unitarian Church of Chicago Unknown authorUnknown author / Public domain

The First Unitarian Church of Chicago is a Unitarian Universalist ("UU") church in Chicago, Illinois. Unitarians do not have a common creed and include people with a wide variety of personal beliefs, and include atheists, agnostics, deists, monotheists, pantheists, polytheists, pagans, as well as other belief systems.

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31. Gwendolyn Brooks: The Oracle of Bronzeville

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Gwendolyn Brooks: The Oracle of Bronzeville William Noel / Fair use

Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks was an American poet, author, and teacher. Her work often dealt with the personal celebrations and struggles of ordinary people in her community. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry on May 1, 1950, for Annie Allen, making her the first African American to receive a Pulitzer Prize.

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32. Nativity of Our Lord Catholic Church

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Nativity of Our Lord Catholic Church Zol87 from Chicago, IL USA / CC BY-SA 2.0

Nativity of Our Lord Catholic Church is one of the oldest churches in Chicago, Illinois, founded in 1868. The church was designed by noted architect Patrick Keely, an architectural designer prominent throughout the 19th century. He also designed Holy Name Cathedral in downtown Chicago.

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33. Nuclear Energy

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Nuclear Energy Pearson Scott Foresman / Public domain

Nuclear Energy (1964–66) is a bronze sculpture by Henry Moore on the campus of the University of Chicago at the site of the world's first nuclear reactor, Chicago Pile-1. The first human-made self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction was created here on December 2, 1942.

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34. KAM Isaiah Israel Temple

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KAM Isaiah Israel Temple Self-created photograph by Jonathunder / GFDL

KAM Isaiah Israel is a Reform synagogue located at 1100 E. Hyde Park Boulevard in the historic Kenwood neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois. It is the oldest Jewish congregation in Chicago, with its oldest core founded in 1847 as Kehilath Anshe Ma'arav.

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35. South Shore Cultural Center

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South Shore Cultural Center Zol87 from Chicago, IL, USA / CC BY-SA 4.0

The South Shore Cultural Center, in Chicago, Illinois, is a cultural facility located at 71st Street and South Shore Drive, in the city's South Shore neighborhood. It encompasses the grounds of the former South Shore Country Club.

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36. David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art

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The David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art is an art museum located on the campus of the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois. The permanent collection has over 15,000 objects. Admission is free and open to the general public.

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Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.