23 Sights in Groton, United States (with Map and Images)

Here you can find interesting sights in Groton, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about the sight. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 23 sights are available in Groton, United States.

List of cities in United States Sightseeing Tours in Groton

1. Groton Monument

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The Groton Monument, sometimes called the Fort Griswold Monument, is a granite monument in Groton, Connecticut. It is dedicated to the defenders who fell during the Battle of Groton Heights on September 6, 1781. The monument was originally 127 feet (39 m) high, but it was changed in 1881 to commemorate the centennial of the Battle of Groton Heights; the cupola was removed and replaced by an iron-capped pyramid in emulation of the Bunker Hill Monument. The Groton monument bears a plaque describing the events of the Battle of Groton Heights, and another plaque with the names of the Americans who died in the battle. Lightning destroyed the capstone in 1918 and damaged the adjacent Monument House Museum which features exhibits about the Revolutionary War. Visitors can climb the monument and visit the museum from Memorial Day through Labor Day. The Groton Monument is located in Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park, which includes Fort Griswold.

Wikipedia: Groton Monument (EN)

2. Montauk Avenue Historic District

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The Montauk Avenue Historic District encompasses a residential area of New London, Connecticut that was a planned subdivision developed in the early 20th century as a "streetcar suburb". The district consists of 341 buildings and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on December 18, 1990. The district's main thoroughfares are Montauk Avenue and Ocean Avenue, which roughly define its western and eastern bounds, and it includes small cross streets between Willetts Avenue and Fair Harbour Place. Most of the district's houses were built after 1895, and are wood-frame structures in vernacular renditions of architectural revival styles popular in the early 20th century. Transitional forms between Queen Anne and other styles predominate. There are only four non-residential buildings in the district, all of which are masonry : two schools, a church, and a fire station.

Wikipedia: Montauk Avenue Historic District (EN)

3. Rossie Velvet Mill Historic District

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The Rossie Velvet Mill Historic District is located in the village of Mystic in Stonington, Connecticut. Its main focus is the former Rossie Velvet Mill, a large brick industrial facility on the east side of Greenmanville Avenue that is now a research center for the nearby Mystic Seaport Museum. The district extends along Greenmanville Avenue between Pleasant Street in the north and the museum complex in the south. Most of the buildings in the district are residential housing built to house workers at the mill, and were built between about 1850 and 1950. The district includes 51 properties in 120 acres (49 ha). The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 9, 2007.

Wikipedia: Rossie Velvet Mill Historic District (EN)

4. Williams Memorial Park Historic District

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The Williams Memorial Park Historic District is located in New London, Connecticut, roughly bounded by Hempstead, Broad, Mercer and Williams Streets, with houses on Broad Street south to Cottage Street included. Williams Memorial Park – which was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted – is also included, as is the Civil War monument located there; 16 houses are part of the district, while two buildings – a brick office building at 43 Broad Street and an apartment building at 127 Hempstead Street, are non-contributing properties. Four of the six outbuildings in the district are contributing. Nine different architectural styles are represented in the district.

Wikipedia: Williams Memorial Park Historic District (EN)

5. Charles W. Morgan

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Charles W. Morgan is an American whaling ship built in 1841 that was active during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Ships of this type were used to harvest the blubber of whales for whale oil which was commonly used in lamps. Charles W. Morgan has served as a museum ship since the 1940s and is now an exhibit at the Mystic Seaport museum in Mystic, Connecticut. She is the world's oldest surviving (non-wrecked) merchant vessel, the only surviving wooden whaling ship from the 19th century American merchant fleet, and second to the USS Constitution, the oldest seaworthy vessel in the world. The Morgan was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966.

Wikipedia: Charles W. Morgan (ship) (EN)

6. Coit Street Historic District

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The Coit Street Historic District in New London, Connecticut is a historic district that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. It includes 33 contributing buildings over a 4 acres (1.6 ha) area, located just southwest of the city's central business district. The area included in the district was formerly known as Bream Cove, which was filled in and developed in the 19th century. The area includes four out of twelve surviving 18th-century buildings in the city. It includes all of the properties on Coit and Brewer Streets, as well as those on Blinman Street between those two streets.

Wikipedia: Coit Street Historic District (EN)

7. Nathaniel Hempstead House

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Nathaniel Hempstead House Jerry Dougherty. / CC BY 2.5

The Nathaniel Hempstead House, also known as the Old Huguenot House, is a historic house museum on Hempstead Street in New London, Connecticut. Built about 1759, it is an architecturally unusual stone house with a gambrel roof, a style not otherwise seen in the city. Because of its unusual form, it was thought to have been built by French Huguenot immigrants at an earlier date. The house is owned by Connecticut Landmarks, along with the adjacent Joshua Hempsted House, operating the pair as the Hempstead Houses museum. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 2, 1970.

Wikipedia: Nathaniel Hempstead House (EN)

8. Custom House Maritime Museum

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The New London Custom House is a historic custom house at 150 Bank Street in New London, Connecticut, built in 1833-35. It was designed by Robert Mills, one of the country's first formally trained architects. From 1839-40, the schooner La Amistad, on which captured Africans meant for the slave trade rebelled, was impounded at a wharf behind the customhouse. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places for its architecture in 1970, and is now a local museum covering the city's maritime history.

Wikipedia: New London Customhouse (EN)

9. Huntington Street Baptist Church

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The Huntington Street Baptist Church is a historic Baptist Church meeting house at 29 Huntington Street in New London, Connecticut. Built in 1843 by John Bishop, who also designed it, it is one of the last major examples of Greek Revival architecture to be built in the city. The church was built by a Universalist congregation and then purchased by a Baptist one. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. As of 2017, the church is still in use as a Baptist house of worship.

Wikipedia: Huntington Street Baptist Church (EN)

10. L. A. Dunton

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L. A. Dunton is a National Historic Landmark fishing schooner and museum exhibit located at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, Connecticut. Built in 1921, she is one of three remaining vessels afloat of this type, which was once the most common sail-powered fishing vessel sailing from New England ports. In service in New England waters until the 1930s and Newfoundland into the 1950s. After a brief period as a cargo ship, she was acquired by the museum and restored to her original condition.

Wikipedia: L. A. Dunton (schooner) (EN)

11. Mystic Bridge Historic District

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The Mystic Bridge Historic District is a historic district in the village of Mystic, Connecticut on the Stonington side of the Mystic River. It includes the Mystic Seaport Museum, whose grounds and floating vessels represent the area's history, and the 1924 Mystic River Bascule Bridge. The district is significant as a well-preserved shipbuilding and maritime village of the 19th and early 20th centuries, and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Wikipedia: Mystic Bridge Historic District (EN)

12. Hempstead Historic District

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The Hempstead Historic District of New London, Connecticut encompasses a residential area north of the city's harbor and central business district, extending mainly along three roughly parallel streets: Franklin and Hempstead Streets, and Mountain Avenue. The area was settled in the 17th century, and has three centuries of architecture depicting an increasingly urban area. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on July 31, 1986.

Wikipedia: Hempstead Historic District (EN)

13. Mystic Seaport Marine Museum

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Mystic Seaport Museum or Mystic Seaport: The Museum of America and the Sea in Mystic, Connecticut is the largest maritime museum in the United States. It is notable for its collection of sailing ships and boats and for the re-creation of the crafts and fabric of an entire 19th-century seafaring village. It consists of more than 60 historic buildings, most of them rare commercial structures moved to the 19-acre (0.077 km2) site and meticulously restored.

Wikipedia: Mystic Seaport (EN)

14. Centro de la Comunidad

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The Ohev Sholem Synagogue is a historic synagogue building at 109 Blinman Street in New London, Connecticut. Built in 1919, the building is good example of the Classical Revival and Colonial Revival style applied to synagogue architecture. The building served a religious function until 1974, when it was sold to a Latino community organization. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995 for its architectural significance.

Wikipedia: Ohev Sholem Synagogue (New London, Connecticut) (EN)

15. Fort Trumbull State Park

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Fort Trumbull State Park Seth Eastman / Public domain

Fort Trumbull is a fort near the mouth of the Thames River on Long Island Sound in New London, Connecticut and named for Governor Jonathan Trumbull. The original fort was built in 1777, but the present fortification was built between 1839 and 1852. The site lies adjacent to the Coast Guard Station New London and is managed as the 16-acre Fort Trumbull State Park by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

Wikipedia: Fort Trumbull (EN)

16. Whale Oil Row

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Whale Oil Row is a collection of four similar, high-quality Greek Revival houses standing side by side at 105–119 Huntington Street in New London, Connecticut. All were built for developer Ezra Chappel between 1835 and 1845 by Charles Henry Boebe, and exemplify the wealth and taste of New London's whaling-funded upper class. They were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

Wikipedia: Whale Oil Row (EN)

17. Downtown New London Historic District

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The Downtown New London Historic District, also known as the Waterfront Historic District, refers to 78 acres (32 ha) with 223 contributing buildings along the waterfront of New London, Connecticut. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in 1979, with 190 buildings and 60 acres (24 ha). The district was expanded in 1988, adding 18 acres (7.3 ha) and 33 buildings.

Wikipedia: Downtown New London Historic District (EN)

18. Public Library of New London

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The Public Library of New London is a historic library located at 63 Huntington Street at the corner of State Street, New London, Connecticut. The library was given to the city by Henry Philomen Haven. It was constructed in 1889-92 and was designed by Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge in the Richardsonian Romanesque style; George Warren Cole was the project supervisor.

Wikipedia: New London Public Library (EN)

19. Emma C. Berry

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Emma C. Berry is a fishing sloop located at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, Connecticut, United States, and one of the oldest surviving commercial vessels in America. She is the last known surviving American well smack. This type of boat is also termed a sloop smack or Noank smack. The Noank design was imitated in other regions of the United States.

Wikipedia: Emma C. Berry (sloop) (EN)

20. Saint James Episcopal Church

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St. James Episcopal Church at 76 Federal Street at the corner of Huntington Street in New London, Connecticut is a historic church in the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut. The congregation was founded in 1725, and the current church – the congregation's third – was built from 1847 to 1850 to designs in the Gothic Revival style by Richard Upjohn.

Wikipedia: St. James Episcopal Church (New London, Connecticut) (EN)

21. New London Post Office

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The U. S. Post Office-New London Main is located at 27 Masonic Street in New London, Connecticut. Completed in 1934 as part of a Depression-era jobs program, it is one of the small number of such post offices designed by a private architectural firm, Payne & Keefe. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

Wikipedia: United States Post Office–New London Main (EN)

22. Williams Memorial Institute Building

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The Williams School is a private co-educational secondary school in New London, Connecticut, that offers classes from 6th grade to 12th grade. It was founded as the Williams Memorial Institute (WMI) by Harriet Peck Williams in 1891, following the death of her son Thomas W. Williams II, a well-known whaling merchant.

Wikipedia: The Williams School (EN)

23. Groton Bank Historic District

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The Groton Bank Historic District, commonly known as Groton Heights, is a primarily residential 50-acre (20 ha) historic district in the City of Groton in Connecticut. The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 24, 1983.

Wikipedia: Groton Bank Historic District (EN)

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.

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