13 Sights in Aiken, United States (with Map and Images)

Explore interesting sights in Aiken, United States. Click on a marker on the map to view details about it. Underneath is an overview of the sights with images. A total of 13 sights are available in Aiken, United States.

List of cities in United States Sightseeing Tours in Aiken

1. Whitehall

Show sight on map

Whitehall is a historic home located at Aiken, South Carolina. It was constructed about 1928 for Robert R. McCormick, one of the owners of the Chicago Tribune. The house was designed by Willis Irvin of Augusta, who won a gold medal for Domestic Work at the 1929 Southern Architectural Exhibition with its design. The one-story, brick, U-shaped house was built on the foundation of an earlier, two-story house that had been destroyed by a fire. It is believed that some of the ornate interior woodwork came from the home of John C. Calhounā€™s daughter. Whitehall gets its name form the old Whitehall estate on the ruins of which this house was constructed. Whitehall is a Georgian Revival residence. Each of the three sections has a gabled roof. The two projecting wings are pedimented and have a boxed cornice with block modillions, round vents and Doric pilasters at the corners. The central section features a pedimented Doric portico sheltering a central entrance with a semicircular fanlight and sidelights. A Doric entablature extends across the central section. Fenestration is regular six over six with dentiled architraves. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on November 27, 1984.

Wikipedia: Whitehall (Aiken County, South Carolina) (EN), Heritage Website

2. Phelps House

Show sight on map

The Phelps House, is located in Aiken, South Carolina. The house was built in the early 1900s on the foundations of an antebellum house that had been destroyed during the Civil War. It is historically significant for several reasons, one of which is its very distinctive Shingle Style. This style, used often in the late 1800s and early 1900s in the resort homes of the rich, was rarely used in South Carolina. The large house has over 20 rooms, and the grounds include the stables, garage, greenhouses and kennels. As of 2012, the home is available for commercial purposes and due to this use, can be readily viewed and enjoyed. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on June 10, 1974.

Wikipedia: Phelps House (Aiken, South Carolina) (EN), Heritage Website

3. Pickens House

Show sight on map

The Pickens House, located in Aiken, South Carolina. It is reputed to have been built around 1829 by Governor Andrew Pickens for his son. In addition, the home is also noted for its early 19th century backcountry plantation architecture. Eventually the house was abandoned, and in 1929 it was moved from its original address near Edgefield to Aiken by a leading Aiken businesswoman and strong proponent of women's rights, Eulalie Chafee Salley. Around 1990 the home was again moved, this time to the campus of the University of South Carolina at Aiken. Much renovation work was taking place in the summer of 2012. The Pickens House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on May 19, 1983.

Wikipedia: Pickens House (EN), Heritage Website

4. The Willcox

Show sight on map

Willcox's, located in Aiken, South Carolina, US, was an internationally known inn during the Aiken Winter Colony heyday. Operated from 1898 to 1957 by members of the Willcox family, the still-magnificent building reflects the influence of both Second Empire and Colonial Revival styles of architecture. The plan of the building is irregular in shape, consisting of a central block with asymmetrical wings. Of Aiken's once famous resort hostelries, only Willcox's is still standing. The landmark property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places March 19, 1982.

Wikipedia: Willcox's (EN), Website, Heritage Website

5. Charles E. Simons Jr. Federal Court House

Show sight on map

The Charles E. Simons Jr. Federal Court House is located in Aiken, South Carolina. It is significant for its association with the many federal construction programs of the Great Depression era. The building, designed by Columbia, South Carolina architects Lafaye and Lafaye, is an excellent example of a Georgian Revival building, a style often used during the 1920s and 1930s for government buildings in smaller towns. The Court House was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on December 10, 2003.

Wikipedia: Charles E. Simons Jr. Federal Court House (EN), Heritage Website

6. Aiken Training Track

Show sight on map

The Aiken Training Track, with its banked turns and soft straightaways, was considered one of the best tracks in the country upon its completion in 1941. Notable surrounding buildings include a stable, shed and grandstand. The track and supporting structures, as well as other structures may be enjoyed and viewed from the quiet roads that border the large district. The Aiken County Training Track, located in Aiken, South Carolina, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on May 9, 1985.

Wikipedia: Aiken Training Track (EN), Heritage Website

7. Old Saint Mary's Church

Show sight on map

St. Mary Help of Christians Church is a Catholic parish of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston. The main parish church is at 138 Fairfield St. SE in Aiken, South Carolina. The campus also includes the historic 1905 church at the corner of Park Avenue and York Street, and Ste. Claire Chapel (1880), which sits to the left of the historic church. These two church buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Wikipedia: St. Mary Help of Christians Church (Aiken, South Carolina) (EN), Website, Heritage Website

8. Joye Cottage

Show sight on map

Joye Cottage is one of the oldest, and largest winter retreats in Aiken, South Carolina. Most of the sprawling property dates to 1897, when William Collins Whitney purchased the property and remodeled it extensively. It now includes a main house, a stable, a greenhouse, a laundry house, a couple of one-story cottages, and a squash court. The property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

Wikipedia: Joye Cottage (EN), Heritage Website

9. Court Tennis Building

Show sight on map

The Aiken Tennis Club is a private court tennis club located at 146 Newberry Street, SW in Aiken, South Carolina. It includes the Court Tennis Building. The club was incorporated in 1898 with the sponsorship of financier and founder of the prominent Whitney family, William C. Whitney. The building was constructed around 1902 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places on November 27, 1984.

Wikipedia: Aiken Tennis Club (EN), Heritage Website

10. Legare-Morgan House

Show sight on map

The Legare-Morgan House is a one-story clapboard structure built in Aiken, South Carolina around 1835. From 1850 to 1859 it was the home of the artist, poet and inventor, James Mathews Legare. In 1870 the property was sold to Thomas C. Morgan. The home, located in proximity to Aiken's downtown area, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places September 22, 1977.

Wikipedia: Legare-Morgan House (EN), Heritage Website

11. Coker Springs

Show sight on map

Coker Spring is a fresh water spring located on Coker Spring Road in Aiken, South Carolina. This spring is formed by a "junction" where the water table intersects the ground surface and according to archaeological remains, has been used since prehistoric times. Coker Springs was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on January 18, 1978.

Wikipedia: Coker Spring (EN), Heritage Website

12. Pine Lawn Memorial Gardens

Show sight on map

Aiken Colored Cemetery, a historic cemetery in Aiken, South Carolina, USA, covers nearly 10 acres and is located several miles from the downtown area. It was the only burial grounds for Aiken's African-American community through the mid 20th century.

Wikipedia: Aiken Colored Cemetery (EN), Heritage Website

13. Immanuel Institute

Show sight on map

Immanuel School is significant for its association with the area's parochial education of African-American children in the Aiken, South Carolina, (USA), area from 1890 to 1932. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

Wikipedia: Immanuel School (EN), Heritage Website

Share

Spread the word! Share this page with your friends and family.

Disclaimer Please be aware of your surroundings and do not enter private property. We are not liable for any damages that occur during the tours.